The Science of Ice Cream / Edition 1

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Overview

Ice cream as we recognize it today has been in existence for at least 300 years, though its origins probably go much further back in time. Though no one knows who invented ice cream. The first ice cream making machine was invented by Nancy Johnson, of Philadelphia, in the 1840s. The Science of Ice Cream begins with an introductory chapter on the history of ice cream. Subsequent chapters outline the physical chemistry underlying its manufacture, describe the ingredients and industrial production of ice cream and ice cream products respectively, detail the wide range of different physical and sensory techniques used to measure and assess ice cream, describe its microstructure (i.e. ice crystals, air bubbles, fat droplets and sugar solution), and how this relates to the physical properties and ultimately the texture that you experience when you eat it. Finally, some suggestions are provided for experiments relating to ice cream and ways to make ice cream at home or in a school laboratory. The Science of Ice Cream is ideal for undergraduate food science students as well as for people working in the ice cream industry. It is also accessible to the general reader who has studied science to A level and provides teachers with ideas for using ice cream to illustrate scientific principles.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The book is well written and presented with information logically laid out making it easy to find that information....a good mix of technical information and more general access science aimed towards the lay reader or those in the middle stages of secondary school. The experiments at the end of the book provide a good way of bringing the text of life, re-enforcing the ideas covered. Many of the experiments are at a level which could be adapted for homework (as well as an excuse to eat ice cream).
"Chemistry World
The book is not just a textbook for those in the ice cream industry (although I'm sure it will become the standard text for ice cream technologists for the foreseeable future); it is also a great book for showing that science is both fun and relevant to our everyday lives.
"Physical Sciences Educational Reviews
"The book is well written and presented with information logically laid out making it easy to find that information....a good mix of technical information and more general access science aimed towards the lay reader or those in the middle stages of secondary school.The experiments at the end of the book provide a good way of bringing the text of life, re-enforcing the ideas covered. Many of the experiments are at a level which could be adapted for homework (as well as an excuse to eat ice cream)."
"Chemistry & Industry
"A very well written, interesting and readable book."
"Food Australia
"As well as being useful for ice cream science practitioners, food technology students and university lecturers, this book is also relevant to those interested in food texture, extrusions and emulsions."
September 2005 Issue" "Education in Chemistry
It is a pleasure to read this book.This book is undoubtedly suitable for A-level science students or undergraduates on food science/technology courses. I would also recommend this as a readable and highly accessible background resource for science teachers and lecturers.
"The Indian Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics
"Written by an experienced scientist, the book provides ample evidence from physical sciences on the art and science of ice cream."
March 2006 issue (Professor H Douglas Goff)" "Food Science and Technology
"The book is very well written and illustrated and accomplishes the objectives it states, namely to show the many and varied scientific principles in ice cream."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780854046294
  • Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry, The
  • Publication date: 10/28/2004
  • Series: RSC Paperbacks Series , #36
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 204
  • Sales rank: 1,297,636
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

The Story of Ice Cream; Colloidal Dispersions, Freezing and Rheology; Ice Cream Ingredients; Making Ice Cream in the Factory; Product Assembly; Measuring Ice Cream; Ice Cream: A Complex Composite Material; Experiments with Ice Cream and Ice Cream Products

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