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The Science of Staying Young: 10 Simple Steps to Slowing the Aging Process
     

The Science of Staying Young: 10 Simple Steps to Slowing the Aging Process

5.0 1
by John Morley, Sheri Colberg
 

Can exercise prevent gray hair?

Is wine consumption better than drinking beer or hard liquor?

Is testosterone important only for men?

How much fish should you eat each week?

Just because your chronological age is going up, it doesn’t mean aches and pains, weight gain, and lack of energy have to get you down. You can prevent and reverse the

Overview

Can exercise prevent gray hair?

Is wine consumption better than drinking beer or hard liquor?

Is testosterone important only for men?

How much fish should you eat each week?

Just because your chronological age is going up, it doesn’t mean aches and pains, weight gain, and lack of energy have to get you down. You can prevent and reverse the symptoms of aging! Combining Dr. John Morley’s research on aging, hormones, and disease management with Dr. Sheri Colberg’s expertise in exercise science and sports nutrition, this comprehensive guide breaks everything down into ten simple steps for maintaining an optimal quality of life. Follow the suggestions in this book, and in a matter of weeks you’ll begin to experience:

  • An upsurge in your energy levels
  • An enhanced enjoyment of your life

    and daily activities

  • A noticeable increase in the sharpness

    of your mind

  • A stronger sex drive

You can pick and choose among hundreds of antiaging tips to find what’s right for you. You’ll discover the best foods to eat, why alcohol can be beneficial (and how much to drink), what types of exercise are important, which hormones are a waste of your money and which really work, how to keep your mind sharp, and why weight loss may not be advisable at certain ages. In addition, you’ll find all the latest information you need to keep your heart healthy, prevent cancer, strengthen your bones, keep your joints limber, and stay on your feet.

The Science of Staying Young is not just about aging gracefully—it’s about living and feeling your best for the rest of your life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071492836
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Publication date:
11/11/2007
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

John E. Morley, M.D., is the founder and

director of Saint Louis University’s Division of Geriatric

Medicine, which is consistently ranked as one of the top ten

geriatric programs in the country.

Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D., is an exercise

physiologist and professor of exercise science at Old

Dominion University in Norfolk,Virginia.

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The Science of Staying Young: 10 Simple Steps to Slowing the Aging Process 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read a lot of other books on aging, but this is the first one that offers really credible advise instead of fountain of youth elixirs and snake oil! I particularly liked the easy-to-implement 'Action Steps for Better Health Tips' found throughout the book, 63 of them in all. 'I've already started doing many of them!' About the layout: The book has an introduction, 10 steps 'chapters', and some conclusions about the future of aging. Each chapter addresses an important point 'like exercise or cancer prevention' about successful aging. What I like most is that you really find out what you can do to prevent premature aging and a lot of the illnesses that are either life-shortening or reduce how good you feel. All of the advice is also backed by the latest research 'much of which Dr. Morley himself has been involved in', and an extensive reference list is included in the back of the book, which makes me feel better about following his advice. The first chapter is all about nutrition and how important it is in preventing illnesses that people mistakenly attribute to aging instead of a poor diet. It also gives great information about what types of fish are best to eat why teas, curries, dark chocolate, and alcohol are beneficial 'in moderation, of course!' which herbal supplements have been scientifically proven to have an effect and why fiber, adequate protein intake, and yogurt can help you live longer and better. Some of this stuff I knew already, but there were a few, helpful surprises. The second chapter is all about exercise and outlines a plan for what you should be doing to prevent physical problems associated with aging. It includes advice about five types of activities: aerobic, resistance, flexibility, posture, and balance. It also contains great illustrations of resistance, flexibility, and balance exercises you can do at home. It has a section on master athletes and the problems they encounter 'and how to prevent them.' In the third chapter, the authors cover all the latest research about hormone therapies. It gives a great explanation about the debate over estrogen use in women, testosterone supplements for men 'and women', and vitamin D--why it's really the most critical hormone to supplement and why most older individuals don't have enough of it. 'Did you even know it acts like a hormone, not just a vitamin?' It also talks about how to rev up your sex drive. I loved the section in Chapter 4 that talks about all of the creative things that older individuals have done. I've always wondered if my occasional forgetfulness is normal, and now I know that it is! It also gives some doable mental exercises to keep your mind strong. The explanations about the causes of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, depression, and other mental issues were helpful, as well as tips on how to prevent all of them from happening to you. In Chapter 5, you learn all about cytokines and why they're bad if you have too many. Really, though, the most surprising recommendation is that you shouldn't lose significant amounts of weight after you reach the age of 60, for a variety of reasons that Dr. Morley outlines. It also explains why your appetite decreases when you get older and what you can do about it. Chapter 6 covers cardiovascular problems and how to prevent them, while Chapter 7 is all about how to prevent and treat cancer. Since I've known a lot of people that have died from both of these types of problems, it's good to know how to reduce my chances of getting either. Chapter 8 is all about thickening up your bones and managing arthritis. In Chapter 9, which is about preventing falls, I also really got a lot out of the section on SPA, or Spontaneous Physical Activity, and why it's so important to aging well. Finally, Chapter 10 included a really informative discussion of why taking too many meds can be worse for you than not taking enough, and Dr. Morley also pointed out which prescriptions are not good for you