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The Science Times Book of Insects
     

The Science Times Book of Insects

by Nicholas Wade (Editor), Nicholas Wade
 
Insects have inhabited the earth for three hundred million years. Over the course of evolution, they have radiated into tens of millions of species and adapted to every extremity of the planet, from the sands of the Sahara to the frozen wasteland of Antarctica.The Science Times Book of Insects gathers forty-eight articles, by award-winning New York Times journalists,

Overview

Insects have inhabited the earth for three hundred million years. Over the course of evolution, they have radiated into tens of millions of species and adapted to every extremity of the planet, from the sands of the Sahara to the frozen wasteland of Antarctica.The Science Times Book of Insects gathers forty-eight articles, by award-winning New York Times journalists, about the most tenacious of all living things - insects and their cousins, arachnids: Witness the 2,500-mile migration of the monarch butterfly, which somehow transfers the map of home to offspring, who complete the journey homeward that their ancestors began. And the sex lives of insects are an unending source of mystery. Courtship among these creatures can be a violent affair, especially for the male redback spider: He slowly somersaults while mating into a position that makes it easier for the female to consume him.Although pesky mosquitoes and cockroaches have given invertebrates a bad name, the world would be an inhospitable place without them. Industrious manure-craving dung beetles recycle waste; mites help decompose the soil, enabling plants to grow; and searcher beetles prey on harmful crop-destroying caterpillars.For more than twenty years, the Science Times section of The Times has brought readers fascinating stories from the natural world, making the latest scientific discoveries accessible to the layperson. The Science Times Book of Insects will enthrall naturalists, amateur entomologists, and nature lovers everywhere. (71/4 X 91/2, 260 pages, illustrations)

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
...[R]ecent developments about the pyramid of creepy crawlies underlying the bees and butterflies everybody loves, and the microscopic arrangements of chemicals that make bugs and humans at least superficially different.
Booknews
In articles collected from the acclaimed weekly section of The New York Times, writers explore such wonders as the deadly love affairs of an Australian spider; the aerodynamic secrets of insect flight as demonstrated by a giant smoke-spewing moth; the industrious fungus- farming, leaf-cutting ants of the Amazon; and the culinary possibilities of the 17-year cicada. No index. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
NY Times Book Review
...[R]ecent developments about the pyramid of creepy crawlies underlying the bees and butterflies everybody loves, and the microscopic arrangements of chemicals that make bugs and humans at least superficially different.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558217027
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/1998
Series:
Science Times Series
Pages:
260
Product dimensions:
7.32(w) x 9.48(h) x 0.86(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author


Nicholas Wade is a longtime reporter for The New York Times's Science section, which studies by the Times have shown is the most popular section of the paper around the country. Before writing for the Times, Wade was the deputy editor of Nature magazine in London, one of the world's most prestigious science publications, and a reporter for Science magazine, the world's premier science journal. He is the author or coauthor of six books, including A Natural History of Vision.

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