The Scientific American Book of Astronomy

The Scientific American Book of Astronomy

by Timothy Ferris
     
 

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The Scientific American Book of Astronomy presents an astonishing array of knowledge that has shaped our understanding of space thus far, and which continues to stimulate and drive our collective imagination. As Timothy Ferris so eloquently writes in his introduction, "Consider some of the cosmic wonders explored in the book, and ask yourself what poet or artist ever

Overview

The Scientific American Book of Astronomy presents an astonishing array of knowledge that has shaped our understanding of space thus far, and which continues to stimulate and drive our collective imagination. As Timothy Ferris so eloquently writes in his introduction, "Consider some of the cosmic wonders explored in the book, and ask yourself what poet or artist ever imagined anything so strange."

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Anthologies like these are reliable money-makers for publishers, but they are often regarded with ambivalence by librarians because their contents are reprints of articles usually available elsewhere. In these books, the editors of the venerable Scientific American have selected what they declare to be the "best" articles from recent issues and arranged them in topical sections--"Astronomy" has chapters on stars, galaxies, and the universe, for example. But this kind of organization lends only a superficial cohesiveness, because each of these articles was written to stand alone, and although each one covers its specific topic admirably, the sampling barely represents current knowledge in the broader field; most science reference librarians would be able to recommend any number of recent monographs that cover these subjects more comprehensively. Among these, ironically, would be two books by the scholars who wrote introductions to these volumes: Timothy Ferris's The Whole Shebang and Antonio Damasio's Descartes' Error. Make no mistake, however: because of the books' high quality, they'd surely circulate in public libraries. Some of the articles (like Guth's piece on the inflationary universe, Rubin's on dark matter, Crick's on consciousness, and Nemeroff's on depression) might even be considered classics of popular science. Still, library budgets are lean; unless your library does not subscribe to Scientific American, this is an optional purchase.--Gregg Sapp, Univ. of Miami Lib., Coral Gables, FL Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
YA-A collection of 32 essays culled from the magazine that looks at the cutting-edge topics of space exploration by some of the biggest names in the field. One article describes the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter, and another speculates on what Earth would be like with the inhospitable environment of Venus. Bruce M. Jakosky, an investigator on the Mars Global Surveyor mission, addresses the question of where we might look for life in our solar system. Andrei Linde begins his article by saying, "If my colleagues and I are right, we may soon be saying good-bye to the idea that our universe was a single fireball created in the big bang. We are exploring a new theory-which basically says the universe consists of many inflating balls that produce new balls, which in turn produce more balls, ad infinitum." The collection concludes with Shannon Lucid's description of her preparation for and experiences on the Russian space station Mir. All of the articles are well written and accessible to students with a background in the physical sciences.-Cynthia J. Rieben, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Booknews
In 32 articles culled from magazine, some of the biggest names in astronomy describe recent observations and discoveries. Among the contributions are David H. Levy and Eugene and Carolyn Shoemakers' eyewitness account of the 1994 collision between Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and Jupiter; Alan H. Guth and Paul J. Steinhardts' discussion of their inflationary universe model; and an essay on dark matter and predicting the destiny of the universe by Vera Rubin. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585742844
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
06/01/2001
Series:
Scientific American Series
Pages:
392
Product dimensions:
6.94(w) x 9.32(h) x 0.73(d)

Meet the Author

Brief Biography

Hometown:
San Francisco, California
Date of Birth:
August 29, 1944
Place of Birth:
Miami, Florida
Education:
B.S., Northwestern University, 1966
Website:
http://www.timothyferris.com

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