The Scriptural idea of man; six lectures given before the theological students at Princeton on the L. P. Stone Foundation

The Scriptural idea of man; six lectures given before the theological students at Princeton on the L. P. Stone Foundation

by Mark Hopkins
     
 

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III. KNOWLEDGE CONTINUED. FEELING. — FREE CAUSATION. Man was made to know the truth. It is the Scriptural idea of man that he is not only to know necessary truth, as in…  See more details below

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
III. KNOWLEDGE CONTINUED. FEELING. — FREE CAUSATION. Man was made to know the truth. It is the Scriptural idea of man that he is not only to know necessary truth, as in the image of God, but that he is also to seek for truth that it costs him labor to obtain. He is to " buy the truth and sell it not." It may be well, therefore, before we pass from the consideration of man as endowed with intellect, and in the image of God through that, to look at some considerations that may guide us in adopting those beliefs that are based on a balance of probabilities, but carry with them a conviction short of certainty. This is the more desirable because it is upon such beliefs that the conduct of life mainly depends. What are the grounds on which we may not, or may, in any case whatever, found a rational belief of this kind ? And first, we may not and cannot believe a contradiction or an absurdity. A contradiction may be made by two propositions mutually opposed, and then we cannot believe both ; or by a single proposition that asserts a union of qualities that we know to be incompatible. We cannot believe that it both rains and does not rain at the sametime and place, or that the same figure can be both round and square. From the imperfection of Ian- guage, it is not always easy to distinguish between a contradiction and a paradox. When the Apostle Paul says of himself that he had nothing and yet possessed all things, it seems to be a contradiction, and yet there is a sense in which it is true. Weneed, therefore, before pronouncing a proposition to be a contradiction, to be sure that we fully understand the subject, and also that the words, in the connection in which they are used, are susceptible of but a single meaning. An absurdity is any proposition that is opposed either ...

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ISBN-13:
2940020782785
Publisher:
New York, C. Scribner''s Sons
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
229 KB

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