The Seagull (Annotated) [NOOK Book]

Overview

This edition is annotated, and has been formatted for your NOOK.

The Seagull (Russian: Чайка, Chayka) is a play by Russian dramatist Anton Chekhov, written in 1895 and first produced in 1896. The Seagull is generally considered to be the first of his four major plays. It dramatises the romantic and artistic conflicts between four characters: the famous middlebrow story ...
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The Seagull (Annotated)

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Overview

This edition is annotated, and has been formatted for your NOOK.

The Seagull (Russian: Чайка, Chayka) is a play by Russian dramatist Anton Chekhov, written in 1895 and first produced in 1896. The Seagull is generally considered to be the first of his four major plays. It dramatises the romantic and artistic conflicts between four characters: the famous middlebrow story writer Boris Trigorin, the ingenue Nina, the fading actress Irina Arkadina, and her son the symbolist playwright Konstantin Tréplev.

The character of Trigorin is considered Chekhov's greatest male role, though, like Chekhov's other full-length plays, The Seagull relies upon an ensemble cast of diverse, fully developed characters. In contrast to the melodrama of mainstream 19th-century theatre, lurid actions (such as Konstantin's suicide attempts) are not shown onstage. Characters tend to speak in ways that skirt around issues rather than addressing them directly; in other words, their lines are full of what is known in dramatic practice as subtext, or text that is not spoken aloud.

The opening night of the first production was a famous failure. Vera Komissarzhevskaya, playing Nina, was so intimidated by the hostility of the audience that she lost her voice. Chekhov left the audience and spent the last two acts behind the scenes. When supporters wrote to him that the production later became a success, he assumed that they were merely trying to be kind. When Constantin Stanislavski, the seminal Russian theatre practitioner of the time, directed it in 1898 for his Moscow Art Theatre, the play was a triumph. Stanislavski's production of The Seagull became "one of the greatest events in the history of Russian theatre and one of the greatest new developments in the history of world drama."
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940148922445
  • Publisher: Bronson Tweed Publishing
  • Publication date: 11/28/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 336 KB

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    Moonheart

    Sorry il never post again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2001

    A Powerful Work

    I had to read this for a theater program camp, but I must get across that you mustn't judge this play by the title. I was immediately grabbed by the opening scene, and I was drawn into the psychological states of the major characters. It is classified as a comedy, although I heartily disagree - I thought it was more of a melodrama. Overall, I loved Chekhov's use of the the seagull as a symbol for the overall message of the story, which is somewhat dark and sad. I hate sad stories, but this one is definetely an exception! Reccomended for any actor-to-be, or just for fun!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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