The Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart: The Early Years (1899-1931) [NOOK Book]

Overview

This biography shatters myths with a controversial closeup of Bogart at the debut of his career, pre-Casablanca, pre-Bacall, and pre-African Queen, revealing for the first time what was under the trench coat of history's most famous male movie star. Focusing on those mysterious early years when Bogart, like dozens of other American actors, was making the transition from Broadway to the early Talkies in Hollywood, it's loaded with anecdotes and insights about those wild, Pre-Code days in anything goes Hollywood ...
See more details below
The Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart: The Early Years (1899-1931)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 31%)$15.99 List Price

Overview

This biography shatters myths with a controversial closeup of Bogart at the debut of his career, pre-Casablanca, pre-Bacall, and pre-African Queen, revealing for the first time what was under the trench coat of history's most famous male movie star. Focusing on those mysterious early years when Bogart, like dozens of other American actors, was making the transition from Broadway to the early Talkies in Hollywood, it's loaded with anecdotes and insights about those wild, Pre-Code days in anything goes Hollywood that required years of research to uncover. Darwin Porter uncovers scandals within the entertainment industry of the 1920s and 1930s, when publicists from the movie studios deliberately twisted and suppressed inconvenient details about the lives of their emerging stars.--Turner Classic Movie News. Exceptionally well-written.--Hollywood Inside. London's Mail On Sunday published extensive excerpts of this title, referring to it as one of the best insights into the entertainment industry of the Jazz Age ever written.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Claiming to explore the "young, hot and horny Bogart," former Miami Herald bureau chief Porter has penned a salacious account of the actor's salad days. The book drips with gossipy tidbits from Bogart's years on Broadway and in early Hollywood. For example, Porter (Hollywood's Silent Closet; Midnight in Savannah; etc.) says Bogart worked undercover for Howard Hughes, procuring male escorts for the business tycoon. He also charges that Bogart brought Jean Harlow to Mexico for a secret abortion (it was supposedly Hughes's baby); and gives lots of steamy details about Bogart's own sex life, including trysts with Tallulah Bankhead, Marlene Dietrich, Barbara Stanwyck and Bette Davis. Heavy on obscenity-ridden dialogue and light on official sourcing (Porter bases much of the book on the papers of Bogart's friend Kenneth MacKenna), this book might appeal to Bogart junkies, but readers seeking an extensive, credible biography should look elsewhere. 64 photos. (June) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780978646592
  • Publisher: Blood Moon Productions
  • Publication date: 3/1/2003
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 528
  • Sales rank: 698,095
  • File size: 8 MB

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2003

    Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart: The Early Years (1899-1931)

    Regardless of its sometimes salacious content, this is an excellent ¿back stage history¿ about the show-business community of Hollywood and New York during the 1920s and early 1930s. Overall, it is an absolutely fascinating story. Very little is known to the general public about Humphrey Bogart¿s early years, because none of it ever appeared in the ¿official¿ studio biographies issued by Warner Brothers about one of its biggest and brightest stars. But the new biography The Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart¿The Early Years (1899-1931), which I read about a month ago, has many journalists pondering about how to handle its review in a town (Hollywood) that¿s fiercely protective of its own. But during June and July of 2003, the Florida tabloids, as well as some of the biggest newspapers in Britain (including the ¿Mail on Sunday¿) got their teeth into it, and ever since, this startling title has got virtually everybody either commenting favorably on it, or rather viciously picking it apart. Overall, this biography of Bogart¿s early years is exceptionally well written as well as being extraordinarily well--shall we say--detailed. I will be as objective as possible while reviewing this 600-page trade paperback by Darwin Porter. He devotes a great deal of space to the young Bogart¿s association with Howard Hughes. Bogart was so afraid that Hughes would tell his then wife, Mary Phillips, about his philandering that he agreed to do all sorts of jobs for the reclusive industrialist-cum-film-producer Knowing Hughes¿ penchant for young ladies, etc., I don¿t need to go into detail here. However, Bogart did escort Jean Harlow to Tijuana for a clandestine termination said to have originated with Hughes. One cannot read a book such as this without a sense of irony about how American myths are created and sustained, and a sense of admiration for the biographers who unblock the doors and the windows. Illusions about the chain-smoking anti-hero with the trench coat might suffer in the process, but readers emerge with an understanding of who Bogart, the man, really was. It also reveals the daunting odds and the exotic temptations he faced during his struggle for his early survival in Hollywood. While the book also details Bogart¿s own healthy sex life, including affairs with Barbara Stanwyck and Bette Davis, Tallulah Bankhead, whom he ¿shared¿ in a three-way tryst with Bankhead¿s lady friend, and a one-night stand with Hearst movie columnist and Hollywood¿s resident ogre, Louella Parsons. This was in exchange for good press which he received, abundantly, from ¿Lolly¿ throughout most of his career. Facts also revealed in this book, among others, include 1) How Bogart¿s famed artist mother, Maud, enticed her teenage son to pose in the nude for her art class; 2) How the Bogart family helped rescue a philandering young FDR from drowning near their summer home; 3) How Bogart really got that scar on his lip, a disfigurement that marked him for life; and 4) Details about the secret life of Bogart¿s best friend, Spencer Tracy, revealed for the first time. Porter based his book on a ¿dishy¿ manuscript written by Bogey¿s ¿friend,¿ actor Kenneth MacKenna, who died in 1962. The author fleshed out the stories through his own acquaintance with actresses who included Joan Crawford and Bette Davis. Porter admits that the material might still be sensitive for Bogart¿s surviving family, but he promised MacKenna that he would, one day, fulfill the dream of two men, MacKenna and his close friend, Stanley Mills Haggart, about having the Bogart story published. It is based on material that¿s available to no other author. I repeat that overall, it is an absolutely fascinating story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2003

    Bogie bio: Tells tales, anmes names

    Call if juicy, but if you¿re interested in a see-all, tell-all book that divulges secrets of Hollywood¿s most famous movie queens from the Golden Age, pick up a copy of The Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart, to be released this month. This biography uncovers ¿the good stuff¿ you want to know about the show biz biggies and wannabes from Bogie¿s early years, including those trumpeted as queens and queens who could blow a trumpet themselves. In this new and untold-until-now biography, author Darwin Porter (Hollywood¿s Silent Closet, Rhinestone Country and others) delves deep into Bogart¿s salacious, formative years on Broadway and in early Hollywood when ¿talkies¿ were the rage. Compiled after extensive eyewitness interviews, some conducted by friends and companions as early as the 1930s, Porter reveals what movie studio publicists deliberately and studiously suppresses: the intimate details that fans really want to know about. Secret Life exposes the true and tantalizing details of Bogie¿s big game seductions, including the likes of Joan Crawford, Tallulah Bankhead, Barbara Stanwyck and Bette Davis. Not sparing any of the steamy and sometimes seamy details of Bogart¿s well-noted life, this book shatters the myth of the strong and silent trench coat and sheds light on the exotic temptations Bogart faced during his struggle for survival in early Hollywood. Porter exposes Bogart¿s thankless role as errand boy, courier and procurer of male escorts for millionaire Howard Hughes. What you read about Spencer Tracy will startle you. And Cary Grant. And Randolph Scott. And¿a long, long list of others. For those of us who want the dirt and want it quick, the book features a wonderful and handy index.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2003

    All the Things the Fan Magazines Withheld!

    No doubt about it. Darwin Porter¿s THE SECRET LIFE OF HUMPHREY BOGART is the celebrity book of the year, and should fly off the shelves. Forget THE SEWING CIRCLE, BEHIND THE SCREEN, SCREENED OUT, and HOLLYWOOD BABYLON, and any other ¿Sex in Hollywood: tome. This is the one that gets right on down. The title says it all. Most biographies of Bogart give short shrift to his Broadway years, and his early three-year Hollywood career (1929-1931). Most movie fans fancy that Bogart didn¿t truly make a name for himself until he starred on Broadway in THE PETRIFIED FOREST and was signed by Hollywood to recreate his role of Duke Mantee in the 1936 film, from whence he worked his way through the studio mill and into an icon status. But¿I¿ll bet you didn¿t know¿well, all set? Let¿s go! Born in New York City in 1899, the product of indifferent parents (he a doctor, and she an artist, and both on morphine). Hump, as he was called in those days, fended pretty much for himself. After a teenage shenanigan, his father struck him in the mouth. The blow split his lip, and his father, in a frantic moment of desperation, tried to rectify the damage on the spot, but botched it, leaving Hump¿s lip partially paralyzed, which resulted in a lisp which was to become a trademark. Kicked out of Phillips Academy at Andover, Hump met the William Brady family of theatrical fame, and became a very close friend of son Bill. Soon Hump was involved in theatre, first stage-managing, and then acting. He appeared in several plays in supporting roles, often as the vapid ¿tennis, anyone?¿ male ingénue in the then-popular drawing room comedies. In the process, he married two Broadway actresses of note. To further his career? Both marriages were open ones, and Hump discovered the world of bi-sexuality. He also discovered the life of a Broadway bon vivant, and the world of Texas Guinan (¿Hello, sucker!¿), Mae West, Gentleman Jim Corbett, Tallulah, not to mention George Raft and Rudolph Valentino, both of whom started out as taxi dancers/gigolos. O.K. Now, lets do SINGING IN THE RAIN. The movies became talkies, and many of the silent screen stars had difficulty with spoken dialogue. Many New York theatre people headed westward, not only to speak on the screen, but also to coach those silent film actors in the art of delivering dialogue. Fox Studios signed Bogart both as an actor and as a voice coach. His firs pupil was Charles Farrell, screen heartthrob. An early screen appearance with Spencer Tracy formed a life-long friendship between the two hard drinkers. Tracy disliked the name ¿Hump,¿ and changed it the ¿Bogie.¿ Fox touted Bogart as ¿the new Clark Gable,¿ but he didn¿t have the build, or the looks¿and there was that lisp. He appeared in several forgettable films, but they became incidental to his new life in Hollywood. Though still married to his second wife, and actress who chose to remain in New York, Bogie became exposed to a whole new sexual underground in the film colony. He became involved with many famous actors of the period. Many of the names have faded with time, bit then they were in top form: think Sally Eilers, Hoot Gibson, Lilyan Tashman, Lupe Velez, George ¿The Chest¿ O¿Brien (not there¿s a story!), Elissa Landi, Kay Francis. Adding to the mix with the big time switch hitters¿Garbo, Dietrich, Colbert, Loy, Bankhead, Jean Arthur. Changing partners was the norm. Gary Cooper, Randolph Scott, Cary Grant, and Joel McCrea surface as swinging both ways in this Mélange. Perhaps the biggest surprise is the Spencer Tracy confirmation. And, yes, Bogie was not immune to the male casting couch if he thought it necessary. This Bogart book makes for dizzying reading. We are enmeshed in all of the couplings from the twosomes to the foursomes. You will get a bang for your buck, along with much eyebrow raising while reading who did what to whom. C¿mon, be honest. Don¿t you want to know why Gable decked Bogie at a men¿s

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2003

    Rubbish

    This is a highly fictionalized and profane telling of Bogart's early life. It's very poor indeed and, undoubtedly, not even remotely accurate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2003

    Bogart's slacious, formative years

    The early life of Hollywood's most famous movie star has been taken off the dusty shelf of 'dark and unknown' and brought to the forefront. In a new and untold till now biography, The Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart (published by The Georgia Literary Association) Darwin Porter delves deep into Bogart's salacious, formative years on Broadway and in early Hollywood when 'Talkies' were the rage. Compiled after extensive interviews with eyewitnesses, some conducted as early as the 1930s, Porter's latest book uncovers scandals within the entertainment industry in the 1920s and 1930s, when publicists from the movie studios deliberately and studiously twisted and suppressed inconvenient details about the lives of emerging stars. Porter's book exposes the true and tantalizing details of 'Bogie's' big game seductions, including the likes of Joan Crawford, Tallulah Bankhead, Barbara Stanwyck and Bette Davis. Not sparing any of the steamy and sometimes seamy details of Bogart's well noted life, this book shatters the myth of the strong and silent trenchcoat and sheds light on the daunting odds and exotic temptations Bogart faced during his struggle for survival in early Hollywood. Porter's research examines the price paid for compulsive brushes with gangsters, prostitutes and blackmailers, details of which were aggressively suppressed as the leading man's career blossomed, then collapsed, then blossomed again during the 1920s and 30s. Also exposed is Bogart's thankless role as errand boy and courier for Howard Hughes, soon after Bogart's botched seduction of Hughes' mistress, Billie Dove. In addition to 'locating' male escorts for Howard Hughes, one of Bogart's tasks involved escorting Jean Harlow from Los Angeles to a clinic in Tijuana for an abortion of a child believed to have been fathered by Hughes himself. Bogart became deeply involved in these and in other indiscretions which, if they'd been publicized by Louella Parsons (whom Bogart is said to have cajoled and coerced with a one-night sexual affair) would have destroyed his Hollywood career. The Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart divulges a number of unknown and ignominious facts about the life of early Hollywood's leading man. Readers will discover the true behind the scenes saga of Broadway during the Jazz age and in Hollywood of the early Talkies, being drawn in to the discussion of what is 'too much news' or 'not enough news' and insights into the people who got to decide.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2003

    GREAT BOOK!

    This is a great book! It's very interesting to read about a person with so many charecters and about their life. Darwin Porter has a bold and unique way of writing and trully captivated Humphrey Bogart life. I'm really enjoying reading this book and deffinetly recommend to others.!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2003

    Secret Life of Humphrey Bogart: The Early Years (1899-1931)

    Like Bogart himself, Porter's biography is canny and relentlessly hip. It analyzes, better than any other book in print, the byways whereby Bogart (repeatedly voted as the most famous film star in the history of the world) scratched, clawed, manipulated, and seduced his way to stardom. It's fascinating, a wee bit disturbing, and endlessly entertaining in the way it describes the underbelly of Hollywood's Golden Age. It gives a lot and tells a lot--not only about Bogie before Bacall, but about many of his cohorts as well. I loved it. When I gave a copy of this book to my parents, they at first objected, and then couldn't put it down. I thought it was fabulous, but the fact that THEY (die-hard illusionists about Hollywood and its lore) think so too has made me an especially ardent fan. Bravo, and sincere congratulations, to the author. A final note: We've looked hard for other biographies of Bogart: Except for THE SECRET LIFE OF HUMPHREY BOGART, none of them offers ANY details about Bogart's rise to fame. Except for a sentence or two, the competitors tend to focus on stuff we tended to already know about an already-established, already famous, movie star who was hopelessly in love with (yawn) Lauren Bacall. There actually was a Bogart long, long before Bacall, and Porter's biography describes his personality and his path better than anything we've ever seen. Expect high entertainment, and some very hip insights into an age that was raunchier, more devious, and more permeated with pain and betrayals than press agents at the time would have wanted the public to believe. We applaud SECRET LIFE OF HUMPHREY BOGART as the best biography of Bogie ever written. We fully expect this biography to become part of the general canon of required reading about Hollywood's Golden Age.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2003

    this is the real bogart

    i've loved Bogart since i was 13, read all the stories i could find, and now this book reveals the real man behind the trench coat. i cannot put this book down it is so interesting abut what really went on back then. all the other movie stars he knew back then and really intimately, it blows my mind. a good choice if you liked any of the other stars back then too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)