The Seeing Stone (Spiderwick Chronicles Series #2)

( 35 )

Overview

we said no
still you looked
now instead
someone gets cooked

When Mallory and Jared attempt to rescue Simon from goblins, they use a magical stone which enables them to see things that are normally invisible.

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Overview

we said no
still you looked
now instead
someone gets cooked

When Mallory and Jared attempt to rescue Simon from goblins, they use a magical stone which enables them to see things that are normally invisible.

Read More Show Less
  • Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi
    Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
A thrilling follow-up to DiTerlizzi and Black's first Spiderwick Chronicles book, The Seeing Stone has Jared and Mallory rescuing Simon from a band of goblins. When the young boy is kidnapped, Thimbletack leads Jared to a stone that allows him to have "the sight," or the ability to see magical creatures. Soon, the brother and sister are outfoxing a hungry troll, working with a helpful goblin named Hogsqueal to thwart the other goblins, and taking care of a wounded griffin. With more enchanted action than the first book and a suspenseful ending, this second installment will have kids chomping at the bit for more.
From the Publisher
"With their evocative gothic-style pencil drawings and color illustrations, rhyming riddles, supernatural lore, and well-drawn characters, these books read like old-fashioned ripping yarns."

New York Times Book Review

"The books wallow in their dusty Olde Worlde charm: Faeries! Dumbwaiters! Attics! But then, reading has an old-fashioned charm too."

Time magazine

"Appealing characters, well-measured suspense and an inviting package will lure readers...Youngsters may well find themselves glancing over their shoulders."

Publishers Weekly, starred review

Publishers Weekly
Favorite chapter book tales continue this fall-some come to their riveting conclusions. The adventures of the Grace children, The Spiderwick Chronicles #5: The Wrath of Mulgarath by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black, concludes as Jared, Mallory and Simon square off against an evil ogre who has kidnapped their mother. They enlist help of a brownie, hobgoblin and more in their quest to reunite their family. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This fifth volume of "The Spiderwick Chronicles" abruptly plunges a reader new to the series into a world inhabited by a menagerie of magical creatures—brownies, hobgoblins, elves, griffins, shape-shifting ogres, dragons—in which the three Grace children, Jared, Simon, and Mallory, must try to rescue their captured mother. While the series is handsomely produced, with abundant pen-and-ink drawings on almost every ragged-edged page, it feels like one book divided into five for marketing and sales purposes. The action here, though violent enough to suit most TV-watchers and video-game-players, is rushed: one monster is savagely and briskly defeated, then another. Characterization is similarly expedited: one magical character speaks only in rhyme, another speaks in meant-to-be-funny insults, while all three children speak in a colloquial style deliberately at odds with the elegant and old-fashioned presentation of the story ("Oh, crap, don't do that!"). It is hard to be drawn into the tangle of events or to care about any of the shallowly-drawn characters. Once the elaborate and attractive packaging of the book is unwrapped, there is disappointingly little substance to this gift. 2004, Simon & Schuster, Ages 8 to 12.
—Claudia Mills
VOYA
Nine-year-old Jared Grace would have been kicked out of school for breaking that kid's nose, but his family was already moving away. Since their father left them, Jared, his twin brother, Simon, and their thirteen-year-old sister, Mallory, have no choice but to move with their mother to Spiderwick Estate, her elderly Aunt Lucinda's wretchedly decayed mansion. Jared is the one who first discovers the supernatural elements lingering in the old place, but who will believe him after all the trouble he has been causing? Gradually, all three children are pulled into the adventures, which involve boggarts, goblins, griffins, and other assorted mystical beings. Field Guide is the first volume of "The Spiderwick Chronicles". It establishes the family dynamics and introduces the reader to the possibilities of otherworldly beings. It is not necessary to read the first volume before the second, because everything is quickly recapped at the start of the second book. Seeing Stone is less subtle in tone, as the children begin an active battle against goblins, develop an affiliation with a griffin, and outwit a troll. The real magic of this series, however, is in the illustrations. Nearly every second page is embellished with the ink drawings of DiTerlizzi, evoking a delicious classical sense in this modern fantasy. Black, author of Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale (Simon & Schuster, 2002/VOYA October 2002), keeps the dialogue snappy and the children's personalities distinct. The series' intended audience seems to be the Lemony Snicket crowd, a little younger than the general young adult market. Nevertheless, the series will surely develop a devoted following, particularly with avid fantasy readers. Illus.VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P M (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8). 2003, Simon & Schuster, 108p. PLB
— Diane Emge
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-As this new series begins, Jared, Simon, and Mallory Grace move with their mother into their Great-Aunt Lucinda's old, decaying house, where they discover a secret room. A poetic clue leads Jared to a book that offers detailed information about the different types of magical creatures that live in our world. After the inadvertent destruction of the home and treasures of the boggart who inhabits the room leads to increasingly more malicious tricks, Jared is blamed. With the help of the Field Guide, the boy realizes that the small creature is at fault and is able to pacify him. Thimbletack warns Jared and his siblings that reading the book will only lead to trouble, which is what comes to pass in the second volume, when Simon is kidnapped by goblins, leaving Jared and Mallory to come to his rescue. Details like Thimbletack's tiny house, Jared's use of a dumbwaiter to discover the hidden room, and the fights against the goblins will catch readers' attention. However, the Grace children stand out only for surface characteristics like Simon's many pets and Mallory's passion for fencing. Adult characters remain offstage or exist only to discipline and disbelieve the children. The many text-enhancing black-and-white drawings give the "Spiderwick Chronicles" a look that resembles Lemony Snicket's "A Series of Unfortunate Events" (HarperCollins), and the presentation as based on the Grace children's factual story as told to the authors gives it a similar tone, which should add to the books' appeal. While the characters' lack of depth detracts from the quality of these titles, the fast, movielike pace will grab young readers.-Beth L. Meister, Yeshiva of Central Queens, Flushing, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689859373
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 5/1/2003
  • Series: Spiderwick Chronicles Series , #2
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 57,652
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Lexile: 560L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 4.50 (w) x 0.60 (h) x 7.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Tony DiTerlizzi

Holly Black is the author of bestselling contemporary fantasy books for kids and teens. Some of her titles include The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Tony DiTerlizzi), The Modern Faerie Tale series, the Curse Workers series, Doll Bones, and The Coldest Girl in Coldtown. She has been a finalist for the Mythopoeic Award, a finalist for an Eisner Award, and the recipient of both an Andre Norton Award and a Newbery Honor. She lives in New England with her husband and son in a house with a secret door. Visit her at BlackHolly.com.

Tony DiTerlizzi is a New York Times bestselling author and illustrator who has been creating books with Simon & Schuster for more than a decade. From his fanciful picture books like Jimmy Zangwow’s Out-of-this-World Moon Pie Adventure, Adventure of Meno (with his wife, Angela), and The Spider & The Fly (a Caldecott Honor book), to chapter books like Kenny and The Dragon and The Search for WondLa, Tony always imbues his stories with a rich imagination. His middle grade series, The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Holly Black), has sold millions of copies, been adapted into a feature film, and has been translated in more than thirty countries. You can visit him at DiTerlizzi.com.

Tony DiTerlizzi is a New York Times bestselling author and illustrator who has been creating books with Simon & Schuster for more than a decade. From his fanciful picture books like Jimmy Zangwow’s Out-of-this-World Moon Pie Adventure, Adventure of Meno (with his wife, Angela), and The Spider & The Fly (a Caldecott Honor book), to chapter books like Kenny and The Dragon and The Search for WondLa, Tony always imbues his stories with a rich imagination. His middle grade series, The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Holly Black), has sold millions of copies, been adapted into a feature film, and has been translated in more than thirty countries. You can visit him at DiTerlizzi.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One: IN WHICH

More Than a Cat Goes Missing

The late bus dropped Jared Grace at the bottom of his street. From there it was an uphill climb to the dilapidated old house where his family was staying until his mother found something better or his crazy old aunt wanted it back. The red and gold leaves of the low-hanging trees around the gate made the gray shingles look forlorn. The place looked as bad as Jared felt.

He couldn't believe he'd had to stay after school already.

It wasn't like he didn't try to get along with the other kids. He just wasn't good at it. Take today, for example. Sure, he'd been drawing a brownie while the teacher was talking, but he was still paying attention. More or less. And she didn't have to hold up his drawing in front of the whole class. After that, the kids wouldn't stop bothering him. Before he knew it, he was ripping some boy's notebook in half.

He'd hoped things would be better at this school. But since his parents' divorce, things had gone from bad to worse.

Jared walked into the kitchen. His twin, Simon, sat at the old farmhouse table with an untouched saucer of milk in front of him.

Simon looked up. "Have you seen Tibbs?"

"I just got home." Jared went to the fridge and took a swig of apple juice. It was so cold that it made his head hurt.

"Well, did you see him outside?" Simon asked. "I've looked everywhere."

Jared shook his head. He didn't care about the stupid cat. She was just the newest member of Simon's menagerie. One more animal wanting to be petted or fed, or jumping on his lap when he was busy.

Jared didn't know why he and Simon were so different. In movies, identical twins got cool powers like reading each other's minds with a look. It figured that the most real-life twins could do was wear the same-size pants.

Their sister, Mallory, thundered down the stairs, lugging a large bag. The hilts of fencing swords stuck out from one end.

"Hey, good job getting detention, nutcase." Mallory slung the bag over her shoulder and walked toward the back door. "At least this time, no one's nose got broken."

"Don't tell Mom, okay, Mal?" Jared pleaded.

"Whatever. She's going to find out sooner or later." Mallory shrugged and headed out onto the lawn. Clearly this new fencing team was even more competitive than the last. Mallory had taken to practicing at every spare moment. It bordered on obsessive.

"I'm going to Arthur's library," Jared said, and started up the stairs.

"But you have to help me find Tibbs. I waited for you to get home so you could help."

"I don't have to do anything." Jared took the stairs two at a time.

In the upstairs hall he opened the linen closet and went inside. Behind the stacks of mothball-packed, yellowed sheets was the door to the house's secret room.

It was dim, lit faintly by a single window, and had the musty smell of old dust. The walls were lined with crumbling books. A massive desk covered in old papers and glass jars dominated one side of the room. Great-Great-Uncle Arthur's secret library. Jared's favorite place.

He glanced back at the painting that hung next to the entrance. A portrait of Arthur Spiderwick peered down at him with small eyes half hidden behind tiny, round glasses. Arthur didn't look that old, but he had a pinched mouth and he seemed stuffy. He certainly didn't seem like someone who would believe in faeries.

Opening the first drawer on the left-hand side of the desk, Jared tugged free a cloth-wrapped book: Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around Us. He'd only found it a few weeks before, but already Jared had come to think of it as his. He kept it with him most of the time, sometimes even sleeping with it under his pillow. He would have even brought it to school, but he was afraid someone would take it from him.

There was a faint sound inside the wall.

"Thimbletack?" Jared called softly.

He could never be sure when the house brownie was around.

Jared put the book down next to his latest project — a portrait of his dad. No one, not even Simon, knew that Jared had been practicing drawing. He wasn't very good — in fact, he was awful. But the Guide was for recording stuff, and to record well, he was going to have to learn to draw. Still, after today's humiliation, he didn't feel much like bothering. To be honest, he felt like tearing the picture of his father to pieces.

"There is a fell smell in the air," said a voice close to Jared's ear. "Best take care."

He whirled around to see a small nut-brown man dressed in a doll-size shirt and pants made from a dress sock. He was standing on one of the bookshelves at Jared's eye level, holding on to a piece of thread. At the top of the shelf, Jared could see the glint of a silver needle that the brownie had used to rappel down with.

"Thimbletack," Jared said, "what's wrong?"

"Could be trouble, could be nought. Whatever it is, it's what you wrought."

"What?"

"You kept the book despite my advice. Sooner or later there'll be a price."

"You always say that," said Jared. "What about the price for the sock you cut up to make your outfit? Don't tell me that was Aunt Lucinda's."

Thimbletack's eyes flashed. "Do not laugh, not today. You will learn to fear the fey."

Jared sighed and walked to the window. The last thing he needed was more trouble. Below, he could see the whole backyard. Mallory was close to the carriage house, stabbing at the air with her foil. Further out, near the broken-down plank fence that separated the yard from the nearby forest, Simon stood, hands cupped, probably calling for that stupid cat. Beyond that, thick trees obscured Jared's view. Downhill, in the distance, a highway cut through the woods, looking like a black snake in tall grass.

Thimbletack grabbed hold of the thread and swung over to the window ledge. He started to speak, then just stared outside. Finally he seemed to get his voice back. "Goblins in the wood. Doesn't look good. My warning comes too late. There's no help for your fate."

"Where?"

"By the fence. Have you no sense?"

Jared squinted and looked in the direction the brownie indicated. There was Simon, standing very still and staring at the grass in an odd way. Jared watched in horror as his brother started to struggle. Simon twisted and struck out, but there was nothing there.

"Simon!" Jared tried to force the window open, but it was nailed shut. He pounded on the glass.

Then Simon fell to the ground, still fighting some invisible foe. A moment later, he disappeared.

"I don't see anything!" he shouted at Thimbletack. "What is going on?"

Thimbletack's black eyes gleamed. "I had forgotten, your eyes are rotten. But there is a way, if you do what I say."

"You're talking about the Sight, aren't you?"

The brownie nodded.

"But how come I can see you and not the goblins?"

"We can choose to show what we want you to know."

Jared grabbed the Guide and ruffled through pages he knew nearly by heart: sketches, watercolor illustrations, and notes in his uncle's scratchy handwriting.

"Here," Jared said.

The little brownie leapt from the ledge to the desk.

The page beneath Jared's fingers showed different ways to get the Sight. He scanned quickly. "'Red hair. Being the seventh son of a seventh son. Faerie bathwater'?" He stopped at the last and looked up at Thimbletack, but the little brownie was pointing excitedly down the page. The illustration showed it clearly, a stone with a hole through the middle, like a ring.

"With the lens of stone, you can see what's not shown." With that, Thimbletack jumped from the desk. He skittered across the floor toward the door to the linen closet.

"We don't have time to look for rocks," Jared yelled, but what could he do except follow?

Copyright © 2003 by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black

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Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Chapter One: IN WHICH
More Than a Cat Goes Missing

The late bus dropped Jared Grace at the bottom of his street. From there it was an uphill climb to the dilapidated old house where his family was staying until his mother found something better or his crazy old aunt wanted it back. The red and gold leaves of the low-hanging trees around the gate made the gray shingles look forlorn. The place looked as bad as Jared felt.

He couldn't believe he'd had to stay after school already.

It wasn't like he didn't try to get along with the other kids. He just wasn't good at it. Take today, for example. Sure, he'd been drawing a brownie while the teacher was talking, but he was still paying attention. More or less. And she didn't have to hold up his drawing in front of the whole class. After that, the kids wouldn't stop bothering him. Before he knew it, he was ripping some boy's notebook in half.

He'd hoped things would be better at this school. But since his parents' divorce, things had gone from bad to worse.

Jared walked into the kitchen. His twin, Simon, sat at the old farmhouse table with an untouched saucer of milk in front of him.

Simon looked up. "Have you seen Tibbs?"

"I just got home." Jared went to the fridge and took a swig of apple juice. It was so cold that it made his head hurt.

"Well, did you see him outside?" Simon asked. "I've looked everywhere."

Jared shook his head. He didn't care about the stupid cat. She was just the newest member of Simon's menagerie. One more animal wanting to be petted or fed, or jumping on his lap when he was busy.

Jared didn't know why he and Simon were so different. In movies, identical twins got cool powers like reading each other's minds with a look. It figured that the most real-life twins could do was wear the same-size pants.

Their sister, Mallory, thundered down the stairs, lugging a large bag. The hilts of fencing swords stuck out from one end.

"Hey, good job getting detention, nutcase." Mallory slung the bag over her shoulder and walked toward the back door. "At least this time, no one's nose got broken."

"Don't tell Mom, okay, Mal?" Jared pleaded.

"Whatever. She's going to find out sooner or later." Mallory shrugged and headed out onto the lawn. Clearly this new fencing team was even more competitive than the last. Mallory had taken to practicing at every spare moment. It bordered on obsessive.

"I'm going to Arthur's library," Jared said, and started up the stairs.

"But you have to help me find Tibbs. I waited for you to get home so you could help."

"I don't have to do anything." Jared took the stairs two at a time.

In the upstairs hall he opened the linen closet and went inside. Behind the stacks of mothball-packed, yellowed sheets was the door to the house's secret room.

It was dim, lit faintly by a single window, and had the musty smell of old dust. The walls were lined with crumbling books. A massive desk covered in old papers and glass jars dominated one side of the room. Great-Great-Uncle Arthur's secret library. Jared's favorite place.

He glanced back at the painting that hung next to the entrance. A portrait of Arthur Spiderwick peered down at him with small eyes half hidden behind tiny, round glasses. Arthur didn't look that old, but he had a pinched mouth and he seemed stuffy. He certainly didn't seem like someone who would believe in faeries.

Opening the first drawer on the left-hand side of the desk, Jared tugged free a cloth-wrapped book: Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around Us. He'd only found it a few weeks before, but already Jared had come to think of it as his. He kept it with him most of the time, sometimes even sleeping with it under his pillow. He would have even brought it to school, but he was afraid someone would take it from him.

There was a faint sound inside the wall.

"Thimbletack?" Jared called softly.

He could never be sure when the house brownie was around.

Jared put the book down next to his latest project -- a portrait of his dad. No one, not even Simon, knew that Jared had been practicing drawing. He wasn't very good -- in fact, he was awful. But the Guide was for recording stuff, and to record well, he was going to have to learn to draw. Still, after today's humiliation, he didn't feel much like bothering. To be honest, he felt like tearing the picture of his father to pieces.

"There is a fell smell in the air," said a voice close to Jared's ear. "Best take care."

He whirled around to see a small nut-brown man dressed in a doll-size shirt and pants made from a dress sock. He was standing on one of the bookshelves at Jared's eye level, holding on to a piece of thread. At the top of the shelf, Jared could see the glint of a silver needle that the brownie had used to rappel down with.

"Thimbletack," Jared said, "what's wrong?"

"Could be trouble, could be nought. Whatever it is, it's what you wrought."

"What?"

"You kept the book despite my advice. Sooner or later there'll be a price."

"You always say that," said Jared. "What about the price for the sock you cut up to make your outfit? Don't tell me that was Aunt Lucinda's."

Thimbletack's eyes flashed. "Do not laugh, not today. You will learn to fear the fey."

Jared sighed and walked to the window. The last thing he needed was more trouble. Below, he could see the whole backyard. Mallory was close to the carriage house, stabbing at the air with her foil. Further out, near the broken-down plank fence that separated the yard from the nearby forest, Simon stood, hands cupped, probably calling for that stupid cat. Beyond that, thick trees obscured Jared's view. Downhill, in the distance, a highway cut through the woods, looking like a black snake in tall grass.

Thimbletack grabbed hold of the thread and swung over to the window ledge. He started to speak, then just stared outside. Finally he seemed to get his voice back. "Goblins in the wood. Doesn't look good. My warning comes too late. There's no help for your fate."

"Where?"

"By the fence. Have you no sense?"

Jared squinted and looked in the direction the brownie indicated. There was Simon, standing very still and staring at the grass in an odd way. Jared watched in horror as his brother started to struggle. Simon twisted and struck out, but there was nothing there.

"Simon!" Jared tried to force the window open, but it was nailed shut. He pounded on the glass.

Then Simon fell to the ground, still fighting some invisible foe. A moment later, he disappeared.

"I don't see anything!" he shouted at Thimbletack. "What is going on?"

Thimbletack's black eyes gleamed. "I had forgotten, your eyes are rotten. But there is a way, if you do what I say."

"You're talking about the Sight, aren't you?"

The brownie nodded.

"But how come I can see you and not the goblins?"

"We can choose to show what we want you to know."

Jared grabbed the Guide and ruffled through pages he knew nearly by heart: sketches, watercolor illustrations, and notes in his uncle's scratchy handwriting.

"Here," Jared said.

The little brownie leapt from the ledge to the desk.

The page beneath Jared's fingers showed different ways to get the Sight. He scanned quickly. "'Red hair. Being the seventh son of a seventh son. Faerie bathwater'?" He stopped at the last and looked up at Thimbletack, but the little brownie was pointing excitedly down the page. The illustration showed it clearly, a stone with a hole through the middle, like a ring.

"With the lens of stone, you can see what's not shown." With that, Thimbletack jumped from the desk. He skittered across the floor toward the door to the linen closet.

"We don't have time to look for rocks," Jared yelled, but what could he do except follow?

Copyright © 2003 by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 35 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2007

    A reviewer

    1. The authors names are Tony Dierlizzi and Holly Black. The Book is called Spiderwick chronicles of the seeing stone. 2. There are 3 main charactors in the story Jared, Simon, and Mallory. Simon and Jared are identicl brothers. Mallory is the oldest out of three siblings 3. The plot of the story is Simon gets cought by goblins. Jared and Mallory had to go find him. The only way to se the goblins is with a eyepiece. Jared finds the eye piece in his house up in the library. 4. The story takes place at Jared, Simon, and Mallory's House,which is the Spiderwick Estate. The story happend in the past,during the school year. 5. The theme is about tring to save Simon and not allowing the goblins to get to a mysterious book that the children have and the goblins want. 6.yes, I liked the story, beacuse i liked how you have to use a eyepiece to see the goblins. 7. I can connect to the story by having a brother. One time i got lost in the mall and my brother had to find me like Jared and Mallory had to find Simon.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2003

    Di Tertilizzi and Black Strike Again!!

    The 'Seeing Stone' introduces the Grace children to terrific adventure in this suspenseful story of creatures unknown.'Look through the lens of the seeing stone and you will see what is not shown.' We look forward to more excitement when we read the recently published Spiderwick Book 3 'Lucinda's Secret'.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2014

    Anyine nook sex

    Reply to jace

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2014

    Plese touch very important

    You are in the right track but you have to read book number one of the firat seris to really understand it the best you can if you need help or have any questions label your title HELP and I will get back to you as soon as possible thank you oh and by the way greatest book seris I have ever read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2014

    Yeah....awsome

    AWSOME!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2013

    Nope


    Weird much!? :/



    PS: the series and movie.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2013

    Best book ever!!!!!!!!

    Really good book sieres. But you should probley read the 1st book before this. HAPPY READING!!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2013

    Great

    One of the greatest books ever

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 4, 2010

    Read This Book

    I LOVE THIS BOOK & THIS SERIES ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2008

    awsome

    best book i have ever read in my life

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2008

    Fantastical!!!

    The characters were wonderful and so exciting with every chapter!!!I couldn't put the book down..So excited to open #3..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Loved it!

    Best book ever!!KEWL book!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2005

    Fantasy vs. Reality

    Book 2 is a little more adventurous than the first book. However, everything heppened being all in one day, made it a little different from the first. There are a lot more that you will find out, and hoping to find out more in book 3. If you started or if you haven't started reading SPIDERWICK, you should read and do not stop until you finish, like I'am!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2005

    Extraordinary

    This book made me not want to put the book down.Also I like how the author uses great thinking and very good words. I like how the author explains what is happening. And also how he made the book end. Like I said it was Extraordinary!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2005

    Get your emergent reader into reading

    This set of books is easy and captivating for readers that are past the picture books and not quite ready for the bigger chapter books. This offers small easy to get through chapters as well as intrigue in a language that all kids of any age can identify with. A fantastic tale for elementary kids and grown ups alike! These books saved my son from giving up on reading.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2004

    Totally The Best Book Ever!

    This is a very good book.It took me into a world that no matter what nobody could ever disturb me.So i preatended that i was in the story.I only have one thing to say.IT WAS THE BEST BOOK EVER!IT TOTALLY ROCKS!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2004

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Graet Book!!!!!!!!!!!!

    this book is a great book.i read it in one night.it is a great book for people ages 7-12 if you like books like Harry Potter or A Series of Unfortunate Events you will love this.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2004

    Liked it a lot!!!

    I am a 8 year old boy who loves too read.I was at barnes and noble with 10 dollars and picked up the seeing stone.I started reading and I was amased how action packed it was!I can't wait too read 'Lucinda's secret'!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2003

    This book rocks!

    This is a really good book and one I enjoyed even though it was so small. I am eagerly awaiting the 3rd and see many great things ahead for the two vivacious writers!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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