The Sense of Beauty: Being the Outlines of Aesthetic Theory [NOOK Book]

Overview

The author of the introduction to this new edition, John McCormick, reminds us that The Sense of Beauty is the first work in aesthetics written in the United States. Santayana was versed in the history of his subject, from Plato and Aristotle to Schopenhauer and Taine in the nineteenth century. Santayana took as his task a complete rethinking of the idea that beauty is embedded in objects. Rather, beauty is an emotion, a value, and a sense of the good. In this aesthetics was unlike ethics: not a correction of ...
See more details below
The Sense of Beauty: Being the Outlines of Aesthetic Theory

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1896 volume)
FREE

Overview

The author of the introduction to this new edition, John McCormick, reminds us that The Sense of Beauty is the first work in aesthetics written in the United States. Santayana was versed in the history of his subject, from Plato and Aristotle to Schopenhauer and Taine in the nineteenth century. Santayana took as his task a complete rethinking of the idea that beauty is embedded in objects. Rather, beauty is an emotion, a value, and a sense of the good. In this aesthetics was unlike ethics: not a correction of evil or pursuit of the virtuous. Rather it is a pleasure that residues in the sense of self. The work is divided into chapters on the materials of beauty, form, and expression. A good many of Santayana's later works are presaged by this early effort. And this volume also anticipates the development of art as a movement as well as a value apart from other aspects of life.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940025766001
  • Publisher: C. Scribner's sons
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1896 volume
  • File size: 422 KB

Table of Contents

Introduction to the Transaction Edition
Preface
Pt. I The Nature of Beauty
1 The philosophy of beauty is a theory of values 14
2 Preference is ultimately irrational 18
3 Contrast between moral and aesthetic values 23
4 Work and play 25
5 All values are in one sense aesthetic 28
6 Aesthetic consecration of general principles 31
7 Contrast of aesthetic and physical pleasures 35
8 The differentia of aesthetic pleasure not its disinterestedness 37
9 The differentia of aesthetic pleasure not its universality 40
10 The differentia of aesthetic pleasure: its objectification 44
11 The definition of beauty 49
Pt. II The Materials of Beauty
12 All human functions may contribute to the sense of beauty 53
13 The influence of the passion of love 56
14 Social instincts and their aesthetic influence 62
15 The lower senses 65
16 Sound 68
17 Colour 72
18 Materials surveyed 76
Pt. III Form
19 There is a beauty of form 82
20 Physiology of the perception of form 85
21 Values of geometrical figures 88
22 Symmetry 91
23 Form the unity of a manifold 95
24 Multiplicity in uniformity 97
25 Example of the stars 100
26 Defects of pure multiplicity 106
27 Aesthetics of democracy 110
28 Values of types and values of examples 112
29 Origin of types 116
30 The average modified in the direction of pleasure 121
31 Are all things beautiful? 126
32 Effects of indeterminate form 131
33 Example of landscape 133
34 Extensions to objects usually not regarded aesthetically 138
35 Further dangers of indeterminateness 142
36 The illusion of infinite perfection 146
37 Organized nature the source of apperceptive forms 152
38 Utility the principle of organization in nature 155
39 The relation of utility to beauty 157
40 Utility the principle of organization in the arts 160
41 Form and adventitious ornament 163
42 Form in words 167
43 Syntactical form 171
44 Literary form. The plot 174
45 Character as an aesthetic form 176
46 Ideal characters 180
47 The religious imagination 185
Pt. IV Expression
48 Expression defined 192
49 The associative process 198
50 Kinds of value in the second term 201
51 Aesthetic value in the second term 205
52 Practical value in the same 208
53 Cost as an element of effect 211
54 The expression of economy and fitness 214
55 The authority of morals over aesthetics 218
56 Negative values in the second term 221
57 Influence of the first term in the pleasing expression of evil 226
58 Mixture of other expressions, including that of truth 228
59 The liberation of self 233
60 The sublime independent of the expression of evil 239
61 The comic 245
62 Wit 250
63 Humour 253
64 The grotesque 256
65 The possibility of finite perfection 258
66 The stability of the ideal 263
Conclusion 266
Index 271
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)