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The Septuagint with Apocrypha: Greek and English
     

The Septuagint with Apocrypha: Greek and English

4.5 4
by Lancelot C. Brenton
 

ISBN-10: 0913573442

ISBN-13: 9780913573440

Pub. Date: 05/28/1990

Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers, Incorporated

This edition of The Septuagint with Apocrypha (the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament and the apocryphal books of the same linguistic origin) gives the complete Greek text along with a parallel English translation by Brenton.

From the Preface
This edition of the Septuagint, including Apocrypha, giving the complete Greek text

Overview

This edition of The Septuagint with Apocrypha (the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament and the apocryphal books of the same linguistic origin) gives the complete Greek text along with a parallel English translation by Brenton.

From the Preface
This edition of the Septuagint, including Apocrypha, giving the complete Greek text along with a parallel English translation by Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton (1807-1862), was first published in London in 1851.

The Septuagint (from the Latin septuaginta, meaning "seventy", and frequently referred to by the roman numerals LXX) is the Greek translation of the Old Testament. The name derives from the tradition that it was made by seventy (or seventy-two) Jewish scholars at Alexandria, Egypt during the reign of Ptolemy Philadelphus (285-247 B.C.). It has been preserved in a large number of manuscript copies of the original, and the Greek text in Brenton's edition is based on Vaticanus, an early fourth-century manuscript, with some reliance on other texts, particularly Alexandrinus, a fifth-century manuscript.

Although it is not completely understood either when or why the translation was originally done, it is clear that it in large measure reflects the common language of the period and became the "Bible" of Greek-speaking Jews and then later of the Christians. It is worth noting that the Septuagint differs from the Hebrew Old Testament in certain ways: 1) the Greek text varies at many points from the corresponding Hebrew text; 2) the order of the Biblical Books is not the same—the threefold division of the Hebrew canon into the Law, Prophets, and Writings is not followed in the LXX; and 3) several books not found in the Hebrew are included in the LXX— these books are known as the Apocrypha in the English Bible.

While the majority of the Old Testament quotations rendered by the New Testament authors are borrowed directly from the Septuagint, a number of times they provide their own translation which follows the Hebrew text against the Septuagint. In general, the vocabulary and style of the Septuagint is reflected in the theological terms and phraseology chosen by the New Testament writers, and therefore, takes on particular significance for a better overall understanding of the Scriptures. It is not surprising—due to its early widespread use and enduring influence in the Church—that the order of the Biblical Books in the Septuagint, rather than that of the Hebrew O.T., became the accepted order.

Although rejected by Protestants as non-canonical, the Apocryphal writings have enduring value as a literary and historical record of the intertestamental period. They often provide important background and illustrative material for a better understanding of the New Testament "world" and thus the New Testament itself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780913573440
Publisher:
Hendrickson Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/28/1990
Pages:
1408
Sales rank:
51,673
Product dimensions:
6.55(w) x 9.45(h) x 1.87(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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The Septuagint with Apocrypha: Greek and English 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Reading Brenton's Introduction you get some feel to how he personally feels towards the Septuagint a more unauthorative impression I got from reading it. Although it does give you the general history and theories about the Septuagint in light of the Dead Sea Scrolls Brenton's introduction is a little dated. His translation is written a lot like the King James Bible and the Greek and English are side by side for easy comparision. Brenton used the Vaticanus for his Septuagint version referring to the Alexandrinus to replace verses missing in the Vaticanus but this is done in the Appendix. Brenton's very lightly mentions alternative readings and his comments for certain verses are non-existent apart from a few compare this to that in the Appendix. His English is very hard to read for one he doesn't separate the chapters you often have to use the verse numbers to decide where one chapter starts and another ends. He does mention the book and chapter at the top of the page but the chapter numbers are in Roman Numerals and the books are in their Greek Names where his Contents page lists them in their English equivilents. As for the Apocrypha it's not in the text apart from Psalm 155 he makes no mention of it hiding them in a separate section at the end of the translation. The English translation would be good since the Greek is there to back it up yet the whole presentation of this work is disappointing and could've been much better than it is.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EugeneTX More than 1 year ago
Personally, I love this book even with all its difficulties. I would have recommended that the author translator had broken the translation down along the Book and Chapter versions of the more modern text but that would perhaps have taken away from the originality of the translation itself and, feeling what they were feeling at the time of the original translation is the very point I was trying to get to. If you know the work, following in parallel versions of more modern text is no real problem and does allow for great comparison. I do certainly wish that the English print had been much larger. Age and failing eyesight would have been aided tremendously just by increasing the size of the print for the English portion. Negative points aside, this is still a marvelous work which is very informative and useful I would strongly recommend it to anyone wishing to know what was said at the earliest possible stages and compare it with the changes made within more modern text as they developed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago