The Seven Chairs

Overview

In his lifetime he made seven chairs. The first chair, made when he was a boy, was a small three-legged stool. It wobbled.

The Seven Chairs introduces us to the chairs one man makes in the course of his life: a simple three-legged stool, a chair with a heart carved in the back, a chair for his child's doll.... Although each chair starts in the same place, each has a different destiny and an ever more colorful story to tell. From Europe to America, from Cezanne's studio to Notre ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $4.99   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(199)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1998-09 Hardcover New SHIPS FAST FROM NEW YORK.

Ships from: Niagara Falls, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

In his lifetime he made seven chairs. The first chair, made when he was a boy, was a small three-legged stool. It wobbled.

The Seven Chairs introduces us to the chairs one man makes in the course of his life: a simple three-legged stool, a chair with a heart carved in the back, a chair for his child's doll.... Although each chair starts in the same place, each has a different destiny and an ever more colorful story to tell. From Europe to America, from Cezanne's studio to Notre Dame to Maybelie Jenkins's Beauty and Tea Parlor, this is rollicking good fun. Who would have imagined the adventures a chair can have? Inspired by Chris Van Allsburg's The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, Helen Lanteigne and Maryann Kovalski have created a warm and colorful book that will be treasured for many lifetimes. Just like chairs.

Recounts the fate of seven very different chairs made by one man over the course of his life.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
First-time author Lanteigne and Kovalski (Brenda and Edward) piece together the circuitous destinations of one craftsman's handiwork, and subsequently reveal glimmers of the carpenter's own background. Mirroring the stages of the craftsman's life, the first chair, for example, was actually a stool that wobbled, made when he was a boy; the second chair, created when he was a young man in love, has a heart carved into the back; and, bringing the cycle full circle, the last chair, carved when he was an old man, was also an unsturdy three-legged stool. The irony of the artist's loss of control once his creation leaves his hands is best exemplified by the sixth chair: "his masterpiece"--made for a wealthy patron who intends to give it to a rajah--winds up in America, a few rungs down the social ladder, as a doorstop at Miss Maybelle Jenkins's Beauty and Tea Parlor. The warm tones of Kovalski's gouache illustrations are humorous and inviting, and the characters' faces are full of emotion and drama. Although Lanteigne's focus on a familiar object may lead children to a reverence for the things they use every day, the author never addresses the most interesting implications of her premise, such as who this craftsman was and how his creations, like those of other artists, took on lives of their own. Ages 4-7. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-One of The Mysteries of Harris Burdick (Houghton, 1984) revolves around seven chairs, one of which ends up in Notre Dame Cathedral as the magical vehicle for a flying (or at least floating) nun. Lanteigne does a creditable job of extrapolating from Chris Van Allsburg's surrealistic excerpt by emulating his spare prose and creating her own tongue-in-cheek tangents. With only a few sentences each, she describes the seven seats made by a poor craftsman during his lifetime and the fate of each piece of furniture. Some chairs are eventually broken, lost, or auctioned while others take on mystical properties (one helps save the lives of 15 sailors who are swept overboard) or descend to duty as a door prop. Lanteigne's oddly wistful tale would be a challenging proposition for any artist. Unfortunately, Kovalski seems a little at sea here. While her gouache paintings have their own charm and playfulness, they seem at odds with the text. One scene, a two-page spread of the carpenter's daughter tumbling down a hillside, miniature chair abandoned Hitty-like to the field, conveys just the right amount of blithe indifference ("Softly and slowly, it became part of the world around it"). But overall, her style is too cartoonish to do justice to Lanteigne's inscrutable allegory.-John Sigwald, Unger Memorial Library, Plainview, TX
Kirkus Reviews
Ostensibly paying homage to the illustration "The Seven Chairs" from Chris Van Allsburg's The Mysteries of Harris Burdick (1984), Lanteigne explores the destiny of the seven chairs a man created during his life. Lanteigne's chairs act as an analogy for the man's growth and development. Cyclical in nature, the book begins and ends with two crooked three-legged stools: one made in the early years of the man's life and one created in old age, both becoming the property of a calico cat. In the ensuing years the man produces a chair with a heart carved into it to express his love, as well as a child-sized one for his daughter. The destination of his fifth chair is Paris, though Van Allsburg wasn't so specific ("The fifth one ended up in France"). There is humor to be found in the destinies of the various chairs, e.g., his masterpiece ends up as "the prop that held open the screen door of Miss Maybelle Jenkins's Beauty and Tea Parlor." Kovalski creates heavily pigmented pictures with lush images that lend an appropriate other-era, other-worldly feeling to the journeys of the chairs. A great book to inspire children to ponder the "lives" of the objects around them. (Picture book. 4-7)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780531301104
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/1/1998
  • Edition description: 1 AMER ED
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.32 (w) x 10.34 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)