The Sewing Machine Attachment Handbook

The Sewing Machine Attachment Handbook

4.7 4
by Charlene Phillips
     
 

It's time to sew with your feet!

Sewing machine attachments don't have to be scary. With The Sewing Machine Attachment Handbook, you'll gain the knowledge you need to conquer that box of metal and plastic.

This indispensable guide will:

  • Help you identify 25+ of the most common attachment feet and accessories with detailed

…  See more details below

Overview

It's time to sew with your feet!

Sewing machine attachments don't have to be scary. With The Sewing Machine Attachment Handbook, you'll gain the knowledge you need to conquer that box of metal and plastic.

This indispensable guide will:

  • Help you identify 25+ of the most common attachment feet and accessories with detailed illustrations and pictures, including rufflers, binders, hemmers and more
  • Give you clear step-by-step instructions for using each foot to yield the best results
  • Guide you in choosing a sewing machine, including information on what to look for in a new or used sewing machine

Whether you've just begun or are an experienced sewer, The Sewing Machine Attachment Handbook will walk you through the ins and outs of what your machine can do. So grab those feet, and start sewing!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780896899230
Publisher:
Krause Publications
Publication date:
05/22/2009
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.50(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author


Charlene Phillips owns and operates The Sew Box where she collects and sells used machines and attachments, as well as provides history on various vintage machines. She has written books for Singer on the Singer Featherweight and on Singer attachments (available only through Singer). She has run a successful seamstress business for over 10 years in addition to being an educator, teaching sewing and quilting.

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The Sewing Machine Attachment Handbook 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
LINDAVIRGINIA More than 1 year ago
If you own or are contemplating owning a vintage sewing machine or are just interested in "neat stuff." you can't go wrong with this lively and lovely book. The author is very well prepared for her subject and it shows. She has been a source for manyt interest groups. What a delight to have this.!!I bought multiple copies, to give with older machines I sell or get for friends. I learned about her on e-Bay at The Sew Box site, and she is not only intelligent in how the material is put forth, she makes you feel like you can do anything she does. (And with practice and this book, you can!) She can sometimes sell you a part you need or point you in the right direction. I think anyone selling on e-bay or related sites should offer this in their package with vintage machines. Original manuals are great, but nothing like wonderful color pictures. It is lovely to look at, and a really great value for the money. The book designers did an excellent job as well
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is well-written, straightforward and nicely illustrated. I've never owned a sewing machine that wasn't (a) mechanical or (b) vintage so I don't know how useful it would be for those who have newer electronic or computerized models but it suits my needs. By referring to Ms. Phillips book, I was able to identify the attachments that came with my main sewing machine (an all-metal model circa 1952) and look forward to exploring the box of attachments that came with my grandmother's Singer treadle. I think attachments are attachments no matter how simple or complex your machine is, but if you have a newer model you might want to check out a copy from the library first before purchasing.
Booboocitos More than 1 year ago
I adored this book. It is very thorough, clear, well-illustrated, and well-written. It seems that some reviewers have taken off stars because the book is more geared towards vintage machines. However, it's information actually does apply to new machines, also. 1) Many of the vintage attachments described in this book DO have corresponding modern attachments that are easily available through a good sewing machine servicer or dealer (not Sears [unless of course you have a Kenmore-but even so, the reps usually-not always-know very little about additional attachments for their machines & don't stock them anyway, so one must know about the attachment before you walk in to order it], but a place that specializes in sewing machines and vacuums, for example); 2) It gives you an understanding of the mechanical foundation upon which your computer/electrical modern machine operates (i.e. pressure regulation, tension, needle choice and fabric choice as it relates to these respectively)-thereby allowing you to make custom adjustments as needed to improve your sewing and finished product (even on new machines). Ms. P provides a concise, but still informative and interesting history of sewing machines, and also explains things that all sewers or potential sewers need to know about purchasing a machine-any machine. I have had several hand-me-down or garage sale machines, and this list would have been very helpful to me to methodically test out the machine (and make sure that I didn't miss any expensive thing that was possibly wrong) before taking it on, whether I bought it or it was gifted to me. I have a 1935 Singer portable and a new Brother Embroidery/Sewing Combo machine, and the information presented here is invaluable to me, not just because even though I still have the Singer's manual that explains the old attachments, this does such a better job and shows it in action, so I didn't have to rely on the written explanation alone (which can be pretty awful and make absolutely no sense to visual learners). The reason I say in the title of this review that this book can save you money is this: With the detailed explanations of tension, pressure and how these affect different fabrics, you may not have to bring your machine in to a specialist. Ms. P not only describes and illustrates the problem (by how the thread looks on the fabric), but also provides troubleshooting to resolve the issue and/or tips to avoid it in the future. Tension in particular is a killer to master, especially on any machine-even a new one that maybe doesn't have all the bells and whistles-knowing how to handle these adjustments on your own can mean the difference between you fixing it for free or paying someone a small fortune to fix it for you (these fixes can run you $100-200!). Ruining your expensive fabric, breaking a needle into the machine where it can't be reached or does damage to the machine in some way, sloppy stitch appearance, and hours of fighting with your machine (even a brand new, expensive one) w/ problems like these can be reduced or eliminated by knowing what Ms. P has provided here. I certainly wish I had known these key machine fundamentals when I started sewing, but am so happy that I have this reference now. And at 14 dollars and some change, this is the best sewing machine deal going, hands-down. Thank you to Ms. P for a job well done!
Ttp More than 1 year ago
Covers a host of machine attachments and gives detailed instructions on how to use. Lot of photos to illustrate.