The Shade Tree Choir

( 5 )

Overview

Eight year old Krame is known as the "thinker" to his gang because he's always the ones to plot their pranks so they don't get caught. At home there's no getting away with anything. Krame's father is an alcoholic who beats him mercilessly, locks him away, forces him to stand at attention for hours and is deprived of food and water. His mentally ill mother is also an alcoholic and fails to give her son any scrap of emotional support. Things go on like this until tragedy strikes. ...
See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

Eight year old Krame is known as the "thinker" to his gang because he's always the ones to plot their pranks so they don't get caught. At home there's no getting away with anything. Krame's father is an alcoholic who beats him mercilessly, locks him away, forces him to stand at attention for hours and is deprived of food and water. His mentally ill mother is also an alcoholic and fails to give her son any scrap of emotional support. Things go on like this until tragedy strikes.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781495276088
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 2/2/2014
  • Pages: 146
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Meet the Author

David Nelson's parents were alcoholics and his mother was mentally ill. He managed to survive the emotional and physical abuses and went on to become a physical therapist. He is retired and now is a writer. His memoir "PALS: Parts One and Two" share with the reader his reactions to abuse and success despite his tragic upbringing. He is a performer and the Cowboy Poet Laureate of Tennessee. David entertains crowds across America with his show "Cowboy Comedy Show."
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Gayani Hathurusingha for Readers Favorite "You

    Reviewed by Gayani Hathurusingha for Readers Favorite

    "You're not mine." That had been Bushy's excuse to inflict torture on his son, Kramer, the adult narrator recollecting his past in David Nelson's remarkable novel "The Shade Tree Choir." Returning to his childhood hometown on the event of his father's funeral, Kramer finds that he returns to a changed world. Going for a walk in the neighborhood, he feels the pain of the old scars etched within him. The novel focuses on the childhood innocence that he once experienced as a teenager growing up in a very unpleasant household with both parents addicted to alcohol. The plot gives way to the narrator's attempt to reconcile his past.

    The flashback of the protagonist, on which the plot is constructed, is saturated with details of childhood escapades. The story runs on the dual layers of the psychological aspects of a failing parent-child relationship and the childhood adventures woven around the image of a magnificent Elm tree, which functions as a meeting point for the children of the neighborhood. The diversity of the plot contributes much to make the reading a pleasure. The novel contains a combination of tragic elements and subtle comedy. Thus, "The shade tree choir" becomes a deep analysis of human relationships both positive and negative. Moreover, David Nelson makes the reader realize the change, especially the change of attitudes which comes hand in hand with the passage of time. David Nelson persuades his reader to sympathize with a once-brutal man, and with his sentimental narrative style and the unique way of characterization, he creates a compelling novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 8, 2012

    For most children, when they feel endangered, the source of safe

    For most children, when they feel endangered, the source of safety is to go home. For a child who grows up with an alcoholic, it’s the opposite – home is dangerous, and safety lies in being anywhere else. The safe haven of home is essential for a child, and the loss of that sanctuary is a devastating experience. The Shade Tree Choir captures that essence in a raw and powerful telling of the story of a child who grew up with a violent and abusive alcoholic. “Don’t cry, or I’ll give you something to cry about” is a phrase well understood by those who grew up under similar conditions – and David Nelson tells that story with a rawness that rekindles the emotions of that turbulent and totally unpredictable way of life. It is a powerful story, well told.

    Though there may be greater understanding of that life looking back as an adult, the emotional scars always remain. “I will never forget and never understand why he did all that stuff to me.” There is no rational explanation for the abuse the child suffered in that house Though there can be incredible healing, physical and emotional abuse is a legacy that only those who went through similar can fully appreciate, and which resonates deeply through this gut wrenching telling of the tale. Anyone who wants to understand a child who grew up with an alcoholic will gain incredible depth perception by reading The Shade Tree Choir.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 21, 2012

    David Nelson's book is an "easy read", but this story

    David Nelson's book is an "easy read", but this story is not easy to read. Alcoholism, child abuse, poverty, neglect - all described from a child's perspective in a matter-of-fact narrative that keeps the reader engrossed from beginning to end. For the reader and, I suspect, the book's protagonist, the mystery that propels us to the final page is the answer to the simple question, "Why?"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 21, 2012

    The Shade Tree Choir is a 'can't put it down' read. Through the

    The Shade Tree Choir is a 'can't put it down' read. Through the eyes, thoughts, and raw feelings of eight-year-old Krame, you'll get an inside look at what many kids have and continue to struggle with in the real world and, perhaps, in your own backyard. Just as important, you'll experience the triumph in overcoming incredible odds.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2012

    The Shade Tree Choir is for the realist. It is a most definite

    The Shade Tree Choir is for the realist. It is a most definite read for all who love stories of those emulating the phoenix and rising from the ashes. David Nelson takes you into the heart of the young man Krame and keeps you there, and into the hearts of his cohorts as well. A most enjoyable read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)