The Shawl

( 2 )

Overview

A devastating vision of the Holocaust and the unfillable emptiness it left in the lives of those who passed through it.

A devastating vision of the Holocaust and the unfillable emptiness it left in the lives of those who passed through it.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (First Vintage International Edition)
$10.71
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$12.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (44) from $3.70   
  • New (8) from $6.81   
  • Used (36) from $3.70   
Sending request ...

Overview

A devastating vision of the Holocaust and the unfillable emptiness it left in the lives of those who passed through it.

A devastating vision of the Holocaust and the unfillable emptiness it left in the lives of those who passed through it.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
``The Shawl'' is a brief story first published in The New Yorker in 1981; ``Rosa,'' its longer companion piece, appeared in that magazine three years later. They tell a story of a woman who survived the Holocaust but who has no life in the present because her existence was stolen away from her in a past that does not end. ``A book that etches itself indelibly in the reader's mind,'' concluded PW .
Library Journal
This is actually a five-page prologue and an extended short story. Aside from that, Ozick gives us exactly what we expect: a meditation, in figurative language at times dense and shimmering, at times richly colloquial, of the consequences of the Holocaust. Accompanied by her niece and hiding her tiny daughter, Magda, Rosa stumbles toward a concentration camp, where Magda is to die, flung against an electrified fence. Years later, in America, we meet ``Rosa Lublin, a madwoman and a scavenger, who gave up her store--smashed it up herself--and moved to Miami.'' She still writes to her dead daughter, whose shawl she covets. When Rosa meets brash, voluble Simon Persky at the laundromat, she resists his arguments that ``you can't live in the past'' with some persuasive arguments of her own. Indeed, the reader is uncertain to the end whether Rosa will bend--and whether she ought to. A subtle yet morally uncompromising tale that many will regard as a small gem.-- Barbara Hoffert
Library Journal
This is actually a five-page prologue and an extended short story. Aside from that, Ozick gives us exactly what we expect: a meditation, in figurative language at times dense and shimmering, at times richly colloquial, of the consequences of the Holocaust. Accompanied by her niece and hiding her tiny daughter, Magda, Rosa stumbles toward a concentration camp, where Magda is to die, flung against an electrified fence. Years later, in America, we meet ``Rosa Lublin, a madwoman and a scavenger, who gave up her store--smashed it up herself--and moved to Miami.'' She still writes to her dead daughter, whose shawl she covets. When Rosa meets brash, voluble Simon Persky at the laundromat, she resists his arguments that ``you can't live in the past'' with some persuasive arguments of her own. Indeed, the reader is uncertain to the end whether Rosa will bend--and whether she ought to. A subtle yet morally uncompromising tale that many will regard as a small gem.-- Barbara Hoffert
Philadelphia Inquirer
Brilliant miniatures, rich with passion and compassion.
Philadelphia Inquirer
The New York Times
Brilliant miniatures, rich with passion and compassion.
Philadelphia Inquirer
BookPage
Cynthia Ozick is the most accomplished and graceful literary stylist of our time.
The New York Times
From the Publisher
“Performed by Yelena Schmulenson, whose emotional accuracy eats into your heart.”
BookPage
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679729266
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/28/1990
  • Series: Vintage International Series
  • Edition description: First Vintage International Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 107,036
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Cynthia Ozick

Long regarded as one of the country’s foremost literary luminaries, CYNTHIA OZICK attracts as much praise for her morally rigorous essays as for her satirically witty fiction. Counted among her impressive works of fiction are The Shawl (1989), which won an O. Henry Prize for both short stories that comprise it. She is a Man Booker International Prize nominee as well as a National Book Critics Circle Award winner.

Ozick was born and raised in Brooklyn, graduated from New York University, and regularly writes for the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and the New York Times Book Review.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 15, 2009

    Stunning and heartbreaking stories of the holocaust!

    There are two short stories in this edition, The Shawl and Rosa. Both are stunning and heartbreaking stories of the holocaust. In the first a woman watches, helpless, as a concentration camp guard murders her infant daughter. In the second that same woman is in America living with her memories. <BR/><BR/>I have read many stories of the victims of the holocaust about the terror and bravery, but I don't think I've ever come across one addressing how some dealt with the horror through insanity. Here, Rosa fixates on a shawl that becomes almost magical in its abilities. In a unique way the shawl allows Rosa to keep living even in the face of the unimaginable. <BR/><BR/>I listened to this book on audio and was immediately immersed, transported into the bleak, empty, fierce world of a holocaust survivor. These are short stories at their best, thick and concentrated, demanding your full attention, and leaving you breathless and gasping at the end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2004

    Moving

    I had to read this book for my History class in which we are doing an in- depth study of the Holocaust. In my life I have always been interested by books about survivors of concentration camps, but when I read ' The Shawl' it really opened my eyes. It wasn't the slightly sterotyped account that we sometimes tend to see but a moving depiction of how survivors' experiences affect them and their families for many years to come. I thought that this book was excellent. It told the story of Rosa, Magda, and Stella with such grace it is hard to believe that it is about the Holocaust. The writing lends more depth to the story. In the end, I would recommend this book to anyone. It may be hard to read because of its moral implications, but it is well worth it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)