The shell book; a popular guide to a knowledge of the families of living mollusks, and an aid to the identification of shells native and foreign

The shell book; a popular guide to a knowledge of the families of living mollusks, and an aid to the identification of shells native and foreign

by Julia Ellen Rogers
     
 

This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishing's Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature.…  See more details below

Overview

This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishing's Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940017283271
Publisher:
New York, Doubleday, Page & company
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
939 KB

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Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II: THE BALANCED AQUARIUM AND THE SNAILERY A PRACTICABLE WAY TO STUDY MOLLUSKS ALIVE IN YOUR OWN HOME About fifty years ago a young lady up in Vermont took home from a pond a two-quart glass jar of water in which she had collected a few tadpoles, minnows and snails, and some of the growing pond-weed among whose leafy stems she found them. In her home she kept this happy family; the water did not stale and grow turbid; the animals and plants throve as if they were still in their native pond. The secret of her success was this. The leaves of submerged plants give out oxygen which gill-breathing animals obtain from the water. They take up the carbonic acid gas given off into the water by the animals. Each kind of living thing needs the very element that the other discards. Plants and animals "purify the water" for each other. This balance of Nature is a nice one. Too many animals or too many plants upset it. Fresh water aquaria are miniature ponds, tanks or jars stocked with animal and plant life brought in from ponds or streams. If properly "balanced," the water needs no changing but remains pure and sparkling as long as the equilibrium is maintained. This is the practicable aquarium for all who live inland. Marine, or salt water aquaria are feasible for all who live near the seashore. The law of balance holds here, too. The difference is that sea water is used, and seaweeds and the animal life of the ocean furnish the proper materials for stocking it. Inland, there have been some successful marine aquaria. But it is expensive to ship sea water by rail, and making artificial sea water presents many difficulties. The stocking of these aquaria is precarious business.Successful marine aquaria inland are rare. Public aquaria, like the great institution in Batt...

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