The Sicilian's Stolen Son

The Sicilian's Stolen Son

2.7 3
by Lynne Graham
     
 

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At the Sicilian's bidding…and bedding! 

The only link Jemima Barber has to her troubled late twin sister is her nephew. So when the boy's father storms into their lives to reclaim the child that was stolen from him, Jemima lets the forbidding Sicilian believe she is her smooth seductress of a sister. 

Though his son's mother

Overview

At the Sicilian's bidding…and bedding! 

The only link Jemima Barber has to her troubled late twin sister is her nephew. So when the boy's father storms into their lives to reclaim the child that was stolen from him, Jemima lets the forbidding Sicilian believe she is her smooth seductress of a sister. 

Though his son's mother might be gentler than Luciano Vitale remembers, he's resolved to make her pay in the most pleasurable way imaginable. But when he discovers she's a virgin, her secret is out! Now Luciano has a new proposal: Jemima can atone for her sister's sins—by becoming his wife!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781488000720
Publisher:
Harlequin
Publication date:
04/01/2016
Sold by:
HARLEQUIN
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
12,989
File size:
2 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Lynne Graham lives in Northern Ireland and has been a keen romance reader since her teens. Happily married, Lynne has five children. Her eldest is her only natural child. Her other children, who are every bit as dear to her heart, are adopted. The family has a variety of pets, and Lynne loves gardening, cooking, collecting allsorts and is crazy about every aspect of Christmas.

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The Sicilian's Stolen Son 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really enjoyed
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book, good story , well written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The repeated use of "piccolo mia" is so jarring I can't enjoy this book. In the Latin languages the gender of a noun and its modifier must agree. The hero is calling the heroine a little boy. Not the first time I've seen this kind of squirm-inducing mistake with Harlequin. This publisher needs to have foreign language references checked by an editor who is clued in.