The Signifying Eye: Seeing Faulkner's Art

Overview


A bold book, built of close readings, striking in its range and depth, The Signifying Eye shows Faulkner's art take shape in sweeping arcs of social, labor, and aesthetic history. Beginning with long-unpublished works (his childhood sketches and his hand-drawn and handillustrated play The Marionettes) and early novels (Mosquitoes and Sartoris), working through many major works (The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Sanctuary, Light in August, and Absalom, Absalom!), and including more popular fictions (The ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$36.87
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$44.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $40.25   
  • New (3) from $40.25   
  • Used (2) from $57.29   
Sending request ...

Overview


A bold book, built of close readings, striking in its range and depth, The Signifying Eye shows Faulkner's art take shape in sweeping arcs of social, labor, and aesthetic history. Beginning with long-unpublished works (his childhood sketches and his hand-drawn and handillustrated play The Marionettes) and early novels (Mosquitoes and Sartoris), working through many major works (The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Sanctuary, Light in August, and Absalom, Absalom!), and including more popular fictions (The Wild Palms and The Unvanquished) and late novels (notably Intruder in the Dust and The Town), The Signifying Eye reveals Faulkner's visual obsessions with artistic creation as his work is read next to Wharton, Cather, Toomer, and—in a tour de force intervention—Willem de Kooning.

After coloring in southern literature as a "reverse slave narrative," Waid's Eye locates Faulkner's fiction as the "feminist hinge" in a crucial parable of art that seeks abstraction through the burial of the race-defined mother. Race is seen through gender and sexuality while social fall is exposed (in Waid's phrase) as a "coloring of class." Locating "visual language" that constitutes a "pictorial vocabulary," The Signifying Eye delights in literacy as the oral meets the written and the abstract opens as a site to see narrative. Steeped in history, this book locates a heightened reality that goes beyond representation to bring Faulkner's novels, stories, and drawings into visible form through Whistler, Beardsley, Gorky, and de Kooning. Visionary and revisionist, Waid has painted the proverbial big picture, changing the fundamental way that both the making of modernism and the avant-garde will be seen.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The Signifying Eye will teach even experienced Faulknerians something new on just about every page, while those early in their encounter with Faulkner's novels will be offered a series of brilliant perspectives on the author's astounding creativity and the superabundant richness and complexity of his body of work. With The Signifying Eye Waid will take her place among the most important of all Faulkner critics, and all of us will have to engage and reckon with her book."—Michael Zeitlin, University of British Columbia and past editor of The Faulkner Journal

"In this innovative and arresting work Waid persuades us of the value, ultimately the necessity, of understanding Faulkner as a southern modernist working within two seemingly incompatible traditions: the oral traditions of southern, regionalist literature and the self-conscious, print-based textuality of the modernist avantgarde. Yet The Signifying Eye offers us still more. It develops into a meditation on the unique visions of experience that give modern American writing and painting their distinctive character and appeal."—Maria DiBattista, Princeton University

"A brilliant and important book. This rich collation brings together Faulkner's words and pictures with an impressive array of other artists' pictures—de Kooning, Beardsley, Whistler—and the prose of Wharton, Cather, and Waid herself. Waid's inquisitive eye not only sees but touches all that it lights on. To see what's there and make it visible to everyone who has the courage to look: that's Waid's mark."—Alan Trachtenberg, Yale University

“The strength of this book is that it is a synthesis of thinking about how William Faulkner engaged with visual culture. That said, this book is hard to summarize, as it is not an exposition of a single argument. It is, rather, an exploration of the significance of Faulkner’s writing by an established scholar, Candace Waid, whose ideas are many, acumen is great, and breadth of knowledge is undisputed. What she has presented to us is a conceptually rich, but difficult, book.” —Travis Nygard, Ripon College

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780820343167
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/2013
  • Series: New Southern Studies Series
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 1,462,698
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author


Candace Waid is a professor of English and comparative literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of Edith Wharton's Letters from the Underworld: Fictions of Women and Writing and editor of the Norton Critical Edition of The Age of Innocence.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


List of Illustrations xi

Acknowledgments xiii

Introduction
The Marionettes: Prefacing The Signifying Eye 1

Chapter One
Envisioning Faulkner and Southern Literature: The Reverse Slave Narrative 23

Chapter Two
Burying the Regional Mother: Faulkner on the Road to Race through the Visual Arts 46

Chapter Three
Dewey Dell, Dead Center 85

Chapter Four
The Signifying Eye: Faulkner’s Artists and the Engendering of Art 113

Chapter Five
Echoing Back to Absalom: Quentin’s Reverie in The Sound and the Fury 163

Chapter Six
Bonfi res of the Masculinities: Wharton and Faulkner in the Glare of Whistler’s Falling Rocket 196

Chapter Seven
De Kooning’s Faulkner Trilogy: Light in August, Black Friday, and Black Untitled 219

Epilogue
Collateral Damage, Collating Strange: Canned Death, Collage Portraits, and Uncanny and Uncannable Beauty in Intruder in the Dust and The Town 261

Appendix 1
Willem de Kooning’s Parables of Art: Untitled (“Still Life with Matches”), Weil Plaza, and Woman, Sag Harbor 289

Appendix 2
Willem de Kooning, Light in August, 1946 293

Appendix 3
Willem de Kooning, Black Untitled, 1948 294

Notes 297
Index 369

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)