The Silver Dream: An InterWorld Novel

( 7 )

Overview

Joey Harker is a hero.

After mastering the ability to walk between dimensions, Joey helped save the Altiverse from destruction. But the rival powers—one of magic, one of science—who seek to control all worlds are still out there, and InterWorld's peacekeeping mission is far from finished.

When a stranger named Acacia does the impossible and follows Joey back to BaseTown, things get complicated. No one knows ...

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The Silver Dream: An InterWorld Novel

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Overview

Joey Harker is a hero.

After mastering the ability to walk between dimensions, Joey helped save the Altiverse from destruction. But the rival powers—one of magic, one of science—who seek to control all worlds are still out there, and InterWorld's peacekeeping mission is far from finished.

When a stranger named Acacia does the impossible and follows Joey back to BaseTown, things get complicated. No one knows who she is or where she's from—or how she knows so much about InterWorld.

Dangerous times lie ahead for Joey and the mission. There's a traitor in the group of Freedom Fighters, and if Joey has any hope of saving InterWorld, the Altiverse, and the mission, he's going to have to rely on his wits—and, just possibly, on the mysterious Acacia Jones.

The Silver Dream is a riveting sequel to InterWorld, full of bravery, loyalty, time and space travel, and the future of a young man who is more powerful than he realizes.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 7–10—Sixteen-year-old Joey Harker and his band of freedom fighters attempt to save the Altiverse from those who fight to control its science-magic balance. But things get complicated when Acacia, a mysterious and beautiful stranger, follows Joey back into the InterWorld Base. Joey is surprised to learn that she knows a lot-maybe too much-about InterWorld. With war looming, Joey is not sure whether he and his team should trust her. The Silver Dream will be challenging for teens who have not read InterWorld (HarperCollins, 2007). It includes many technological terms, places, and equipment without offering much explanation as to what they are. A slew of characters whose names begin with the letter J is thrown at readers all at once, making it difficult to remember who's who. While The Silver Dream will not appeal to a huge audience, it will find a following among readers who enjoyed the first book, Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Harmony, 1980), and Star Trek.—Leigh Collazo, Ed Willkie Middle School, Fort Worth, TX
Kirkus Reviews
Don't be fooled by Gaiman's name on the cover: This is a slightly pedestrian if not unsatisfying bit of science-fictional fluff. InterWorld started as a television concept by Gaiman and Reaves, and the first volume (InterWorld, 2007) harked back to the golden age of science fiction, when the science was mostly made-up jargon (and not entirely logical), and the characters showed a tendency toward tropes. This second volume continues where the first left off, compounding the liabilities of the first by mixing a middle-grade tone uneasily with some older content: The teens who make up most of the InterWorld organization are, in the end, child soldiers, and they are woefully underprepared for death, which comes calling. Joey Harker (he'd rather be called Joe now that he's 16) finds himself once again at the center of things when the mysterious Acacia Jones shows up during a mission gone wrong. She's not an alternative version of Joey (of which there are many), and she knows an awful lot. Meanwhile, the newest Walker (navigator of the multiverse) is everyone's darling, and Joey must grapple with jealousy and the first stirrings of romantic interest, even as everything, literally, falls apart. High-concept science, rapid-fire but sometimes sloppy writing, stiff dialogue, shallow characters, and plenty of action: old-fashioned science fiction indeed, dressed up to appeal to a modern audience. (Science fiction. 10-15)
ALA Booklist
Praise for INTERWORLD: “Vivid, well-imagined settings and characters.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062067968
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/23/2013
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 321,216
  • Age range: 13 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Neil Gaiman is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty books for readers of all ages, and the recipient of numerous literary awards, including the Shirley Jackson Award and the Locus Award for Best Novelette for his story "The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains." Originally from England, he now lives in America.

Michael Reaves is an Emmy Award-winning television writer, screen-writer, and novelist who has published many books, including the New York Times bestseller Star Wars: Darth Maul—Shadow Hunter. He's won a Howie Award and been nominated for both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. He lives in California.

Mallory Reaves is best known for her adaptations of the popular manga series After School Nightmare, which was nominated for a 2007 Will Eisner Award. She lives in Riverside, California, with six cats, several friends, a dog, a snake, and a fish.

Biography

Neil Gaiman thought he wrote comic books. But a newspaper editor, of course, set him straight.

Back when he was riding the diabolical headwinds of his popular series of graphic novels, The Sandman, the author attended a party where he introduced himself as a comic-book writer to a newspaper's literary editor. But when the editor quickly realized who this actually was -- and the glaze melted from his eyes -- he offered Gaiman a correction tinged with astonishment: "My God, man, you don't write comics, you write graphic novels." Relating the story to theLos Angeles Times in 1995, Gaiman said, "I suddenly felt like someone who had been informed that she wasn't a hooker, that in fact she was a lady of the evening."

Gaiman's done much more, of course, than simply write graphic novels, having coauthored, with Terry Pratchett, Good Omens, a comic novel about the Apocalypse; adapted into hardcover the BBC miniseries Neverwhere about the dark underworld beneath the streets of London; and, inspired by his young daughter, put a horrifying spin on C.S. Lewis' wardrobe doors for Coraline, a children's book about a passageway into a magical, yet malevolent, land.

But it is The Sandman that is Gaiman's magnum opus.

Though he had told a career counselor in high school that he wanted to pen comic books, he had a career as a freelance journalist before his first graphic novel, Violent Cases, was published in England in 1987. DC Comics discovered him and The Sandman was born. Or reborn, actually. The comic debuted back in 1939 with a regular-Joe crime fighter in the lead. But in Gaiman's hands the tale had a more otherworldly spin, slowing introducing readers to the seven siblings Endless: Dream, Death, Desire, Destiny, Destruction, Despair and Delirium (once Delight). They all have their roles in shaping the fates of man. In fact, when Death was imprisoned for decades, the results were devastating. Richard Nixon reached The White House and Michael Jackson the Billboard charts.

Direction from newspaper editors notwithstanding, to Gaiman, these stories are still comic books. The man who shuttled back and forth between comics and classics in his formative years and can pepper his writing with references to Norse mythology as well as the vaudevillian rock group Queen, never cottoned to such highbrow/lowbrow distinctions. Comparing notes on a yachting excursion with members of the Irish rock band U2, the writer who looks like a rock star and Delirium and the rock stars who gave themselves comic-worthy names such as Bono and The Edge came to a realization: Whether the medium is pop music or comic books, not being taken seriously can be a plus. "It's safer to be in the gutter," he told The Washington Post in 1995.

In 1995, Gaiman brought The Sandman to a close and began spending more time on his nongraphic fiction, including a couple of short-story collections. A few years later he released Stardust, an adult fairy tale that has young Tristan Thorn searching for a fallen star to woo the lovely but cold Victoria Forester. In 2001, he placed an ex-con named Shadow in the middle of a war between the ancient and modern dieties in American Gods. Coming in October 2002 is another departure: an audio recording of Two Plays for Voices, which stars Bebe Neuwirth as a wise queen doing battle with a bloodthirsty child and Brian Dennehy as the Angel of Vengeance investigating the first crime in history in heaven's City of Angels.

Gaiman need not worry about defining his artistic relevance, since so many other seem to do it for him. Stephen King, Roger Zelazny and Harlan Ellison are among those who have contributed introductions to his works. William Gibson, the man who coined the term "cyberspace," called him a "a writer of rare perception and endless imagination" as well as "an American treasure." (Even though he's, technically, a British treasure transplanted to the American Midwest.) Even Norman Mailer has weighed in: "Along with all else, Sandman is a comic strip for intellectuals, and I say it's about time."

The gushiest praise, however, may come from Frank McConnell, who barely contained himself in the pages of the political and artistic journal Commonweal. Saying Gaiman "may just be the most gifted and important storyteller in English," McConnell crowned Sandman as the most important act of fiction of the day. "And that, not just because of the brilliance and intricacy of its storytelling -- and I know few stories, outside the best of Joyce, Faulkner, and Pynchon, that are more intricate," he wrote in October 1995, " but also because it tells its wonderful and humanizing tale in a medium, comic books, still largely considered demimonde by the tenured zombies of the academic establishment."

"If Sandman is a 'comic,'" he concluded, "then The Magic Flute is a 'musical' and A Midsummer Night's Dream is a skit. Read the damn thing: it's important."

Good To Know

Some fascinating factoids from our interview with Gaiman:

"One of the most enjoyable bits of writing Sandman was getting authors whose work I love to write the introductions for the collected graphic novels -- people like Steve Erickson, Gene Wolfe, Harlan Ellison, Clive Barker, Peter Straub, Mikal Gilmore, and Samuel R. Delany."

"I have a big old Addams Family house, with -- in the summertime -- a vegetable garden, and I love growing exotic pumpkins. As a boy in England I used to dream about Ray Bradbury Hallowe'ens, and am thrilled that I get them these days. Unless I'm on the road signing people's books, of course."

"According to my daughters, my most irritating habit is asking for cups of tea."

"I love radio -- and love the availability of things like the Jack Benny radio shows in MP3 format. I'm addicted to BBC radio 7, and keep buying boxed CD sets of old UK radio programs, things like Round the Horne and Hancock's Half Hour. Every now and again I'll write a radio play."

"I love thunderstorms, old houses, and dreams."

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    1. Hometown:
      Minneapolis, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 10, 1960
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portchester, England
    1. Education:
      Attended Ardingly College Junior School, 1970-74, and Whitgift School, 1974-77
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
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(6)

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 9, 2014

    I appreciate the writing style in this novel.  It is accessible

    I appreciate the writing style in this novel.  It is accessible to all ages, without reaching.  At the same time, it’s not dumbed down.  It’s written as if the main character were writing it:  well put together for a teenager, but still a teenager.  The storyline itself was also quite unique.  There is, however, an innate assumption on the part of the author that you’ve read the first novel in the series.  Not that the story is inaccessible without it, but it is written assuming that you have the background information already.

    Although quite well developed, I did find the cast of characters to be somewhat unapproachable and difficult to relate to.  It made it hard to fully immerse myself in the novel at hand.

    As a whole this was a rather enjoyable read.  The premise was very intriguing and kept me entertained.    

    Please note that I received a complimentary copy of this work in exchange for an honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2014

    NURSERY

    SilverClan

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2013

    Yin

    ((So slightly longer than an hour.... sorry))

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2013

    Genesis

    She laid in the grass on her staomach. Head rested on her arms

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    SandStorm

    He nodded. He grew up as a rouge in the forest and knew how to swim. He dived in and quickly paddled, just barely keeping his head up in the rouch water

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    Leafdapple

    Sandstorm? U there)) she paddled toward a whirlpool.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Ariana

    Im locked out of res one oh fuq it

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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