The Silver Flame

The Silver Flame

3.8 7
by James Carter
     
 
The Silver Flame shimmers like the fires of hell, and it attracts people who are unafraid to kill: an American samurai on a quest to uncover a secret; a treacherous geisha on a hunt for perfection; and an illustrious thief who craves beauty. But if you live by the sword, you die by the sword, and in the Land of the Rising Sun even a phoenix can feel the touch of

Overview

The Silver Flame shimmers like the fires of hell, and it attracts people who are unafraid to kill: an American samurai on a quest to uncover a secret; a treacherous geisha on a hunt for perfection; and an illustrious thief who craves beauty. But if you live by the sword, you die by the sword, and in the Land of the Rising Sun even a phoenix can feel the touch of death.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940033283156
Publisher:
James Carter
Publication date:
06/10/2012
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
430 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Born in London and educated at Oxford, James Carter spends his life pursuing challenges. By the age of 25 he had driven from Cape Town to Cairo in a dune buggy, and sailed across the Pacific in a yacht crewed by himself and his best friend.James currently lives in India where he teaches English and courts controversy by staging school plays that call for the empowerment of women and children. He is an active critic of India’s caste system and works with numerous shelters in Delhi that support victims of domestic violence.He can be contacted at olympusworld@gmail.com

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The Silver Flame 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting and witty. Its a very cultural book , so keep an open mind when you read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good story. It's kind of a shame to go through so much trouble for something to then throw it away
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think I would have liked it more if I knew more about the Japanese & the samuari
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BOOKREVIEW.COM review "The Silver Flame" by James Carter is a story of thievery and murder and vengeance. It opens with this sentence: "The Silver Flame sliced through the droplet of emerald green water, splitting it in two." One could say of Carter that he writes with an elegant precision equal to that of the great sword, but the world he gives us -- in which pure beauty and squalid evil reside side by side -- is not so easily divided. Carter is not given to exposition. He supplies the year (1871) and the place (Japan) and just enough of a hint about the characters' backgrounds to intrigue the reader and provide plausibility to the plot. Our hero is an American who is trying to escape his horrifying memories of the Civil War by embracing the all-encompassing code of the samurai and its engagement with death. When we first meet him he is running across algae coated planking on a lake, trying to escape the flashing sword held by his mentor: "Gravity grabbed Phoenix and threw him into a world of sparkling green water. A shocking cold pressed against the warrior's body and stole the heat from his imagined wound. There! He saw it in the corner of his right eye...his sword had been sliced in half. The lake surface slowly fell down and parted around (his) lips. Instinctively he took in a gulp of pure air and savored its remarkable taste...He was back from the dead." Our heroine, too, is trying to escape. In her case it is from the life of bonded apprenticeship as a geisha that has kept her in thrall to a vile old woman who bought her as a child. Carter writes: "Those who were plain and ordinary called her Mai, and they saw in her a beauty tinged with rage." But for those with an eye to rarity, she was an exotic red flower who "danced on water, this marvel of the geisha universe, and she moved in time with the shamisen breeze, suspended in flight and completely intimate with the air around her -- one moment a butterfly, the next a bird." There is nothing plain and ordinary about this novel," but "beauty tinged with rage" might be a fitting description for "The Silver Flame." Bookreview.com recommends it as excellent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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