The Silver Path

The Silver Path

by Christine Harris
     
 
Niko and Penny are pen pals on opposite sides of the world, but their lives are separated by more than distance. Penny lives in a peaceful world. Niko lives in a world racked by war. This moving and thought-provoking story conveys Niko's unwavering hope for a better life and is told in simple words and pictures. Full color.

Overview

Niko and Penny are pen pals on opposite sides of the world, but their lives are separated by more than distance. Penny lives in a peaceful world. Niko lives in a world racked by war. This moving and thought-provoking story conveys Niko's unwavering hope for a better life and is told in simple words and pictures. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Debut author Harris's cryptic story is presented as a letter written by Niko to Penny, his faraway pen pal, who lives in a ``lovely house'' with a big garden and a dog named Scruff. Niko describes the hotel by the sea where he is staying with his mother, who sits indoors and knits each day and cries out in her sleep at night. The boy's imagination helps him to escape these surroundings: ``When night comes, the moon builds a silver path over the sea, going all the way from where I am to where you are, Penny. I close my eyes and imagine I am running along the silver path to meet you.'' On the final pages, readers at last learn that Niko and his mother have escaped to a hotel for refugees after soldiers raided their village, stealing food and removing his father to a prison camp. Ending on a hopeful note (``Mama says that one day, Papa will be free again. She says we shall all return to the village together''), Harris's story is undeniably haunting, yet too ambiguous to catch the attention of the target audience. Ong's impressionistic art, though slightly stilted, contains a number of affecting images. Ages 7-10. (May)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-A poignant story that takes the form of a letter written to a far-away pen pal. Niko begins by thanking Penny for her letter and pictures of her lovely house and garden. He then proceeds to describe his living situation. He is a refugee from an unidentified military regime, living in exile with his mother; his father has been sent to prison for speaking out against the soldiers. He has enough to eat and a room looking out over the ocean, but he misses his father and yearns for the day when his family will be reunited and can return to their home. A full-page impressionist oil painting faces each page of text. The boy's unwavering optimism and spirit contrast sharply with his circumstances and sadly remind readers that children are often the innocent victims of political upheaval and injustice. Beautifully written, this understated but powerful narrative will generate thought and discussion among youngsters everywhere.-Cyrisse Jaffee, formerly at Newton Public Schools, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781854303233
Publisher:
Magi Publications
Publication date:
08/25/1995
Pages:
32

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Christine Harris lives in a small English village with her husband, Peter, who also is a writer. This is her first picture book.

Helen Ong is the illustrator of Rabindranath Tagore's Amal and the Letter from the King, retold by Chitra Gajadin. She lives in the Netherlands.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >