The Sixteenth Minute

The Sixteenth Minute

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by Jeff Guinn, Douglas Perry
     
 

This fascinating examination of American celebrity asks, "What happens when your fifteen minutes are over?"

In the decades since Andy Warhol made his infamous prognosis that, in the future, everyone would be famous for fifteen minutes, celebrity has indeed become one of America's greatest growth industries. In The Sixteenth Minute, Jeff Guinn and Douglas Perry

Overview

This fascinating examination of American celebrity asks, "What happens when your fifteen minutes are over?"

In the decades since Andy Warhol made his infamous prognosis that, in the future, everyone would be famous for fifteen minutes, celebrity has indeed become one of America's greatest growth industries. In The Sixteenth Minute, Jeff Guinn and Douglas Perry explore the treacherous aftermath of fame, bringing depth and insight to a subject that is often treated as superficially as the people who temporarily achieve it.

In a world where, as social historian Leo Braudy put it, "The world of images is so much better than real life," what happens when the spotlight clicks off? For their book, Guinn and Perry interviewed an array of individuals who experienced Warhol's "fifteen minutes" and survived, some more happily (and successfully) than others. The book's subjects span the celebrity spectrum from politics (former Speaker of the House Jim Wright) to professional sports (onetime Great White Hope Gerry Cooney) to entertainment (Fame diva Irene Cara), and, of course, reality TV (a rare glimpse of American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson as she frets about how to remain in the spotlight she craved from childhood).

No one who experiences fame walks away the same. All the men and women profiled in The Sixteenth Minute have had to move on with their lives. Often, they found ways to reclaim their self-respect, if not always their reputations. In a few in-stances, the desire to recapture former glory eclipsed common sense with predictably painful results. In every case, their experiences reflect our culture, where fame is often considered the ultimate life achievement.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585423897
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/17/2005
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
6.75(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.13(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author

Jeff Guinn is books editor at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. He is the author of eight books, including The Sixteenth Minute: Life in the Aftermath of Fame and Our Land Before We Die: The Proud Story of the Seminole Negro, which received the Texas Book Award.

Jeff Guinn is also the author of the bestselling Christmas Chronicles series, which includes The Autobiography of Santa Claus, How Mrs. Claus Saved Christmas, and The Great Santa Search. He lives in Fort Worth, Texas.

DOUGLAS PERRY is an award-winning writer and editor whose work has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, The San Jose Mercury News, Details, and The Oregonian. He is the online features editor at The Oregonian and the co-author of The Sixteenth Minute: Life in the Aftermath of Fame. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

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The Sixteenth Minute 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this book expecting social criticism along the lines of Neil Postman. Instead the book is virtually absent of any kind of real depth. There are a few comments about the speed with which people fall in and out of fame, but they don't follow through with any thorough and meaningful explanation or why our culture developed this way or it's consequences on popular thought. Most of the book is spent describing how the people profiled became famous interspersed with what they are doing now. I was expecting some kind of consistency or common principle about what happens when people fall out of fame. The 'treacherous aftermath' described in the blurb is nearly absent in the book, much more detail is given to actions like playing golf, working on an album or giving pep talks in jails. The blurb could have easily read: 'A book about the boring lives of people who happened to be famous at one time or another.' To answer the question posed on the cover, 'What happens when your fifteen minutes are over?': nothing worth writing about.