The Skeleton: Biochemical, Genetic, and Molecular Interactions in Development and Homeostasis

Overview

A cutting-edge review of the biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, genetic, and molecular interactions involved in the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Topics range from chondrogenesis, chondrocytes, and cartilage to skeletal dysmorphology, and include the control of skeletal development, osteoblastic cell differentiation, and bone induction, growth, remodeling, and mineralization. The authors' understanding of bone physiology-and how it is modified throughout all the stages of life-offers ...
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Overview

A cutting-edge review of the biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, genetic, and molecular interactions involved in the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Topics range from chondrogenesis, chondrocytes, and cartilage to skeletal dysmorphology, and include the control of skeletal development, osteoblastic cell differentiation, and bone induction, growth, remodeling, and mineralization. The authors' understanding of bone physiology-and how it is modified throughout all the stages of life-offers novel approaches for improving the endurance of load-bearing implants, achieving life-long optimal bone strength, overcoming microgravity situations (space flight), and hastening the healing of fractures, osteotomies, and antrodeses.
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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Edgar F. Allin, MD (Midwestern University)
Description: This is a compilation of 26 invited chapters by 73 authors from 11 countries, synopsizing many aspects of the normal and pathological genetics and epigenetics of bone and cartilage.
Purpose: The goal is "to provide researchers and students with an overview of selected topics of current interest in bone biology and to stimulate their interest in this fascinating and diverse field." In view of the ongoing exponential increase in information on the molecular and developmental biology of skeletal tissues, this is a very worthy aim, and is quite successfully met.
Audience: Most undergraduates, medical students, and clinicians will find this book too advanced or research-oriented for their liking. However, more sophisticated students and inquisitive clinicians should find much of interest and relevance to fields as varied as environmental toxicology, dysmorphogenesis, biomedical engineering, obstetrics, geriatrics, and oncology.
Features: Much attention is given to the agents controlling chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, from intercellular signaling molecules to the regulation of gene expression by transcription factors and post-transcriptional modification of gene products. Bone deposition, resorption, remodeling, and mineralization are all addressed. A very extensive tabulation is presented of human genetic disorders affecting the skeleton and, where known, their probable mechanisms. Several major disorders are considered in some detail. One chapter focuses on effects of disuse, in particular "microgravity" (weightlessness would be a preferable term, given that objects in near-earth orbit are acted on by virtually undiminished gravitational forces but are in continuous free fall). Another chapter extensively surveys prenatal mineral metabolism. There is no glossary but technical terms and acronyms are reintroduced in each chapter, and each chapter has its own bibliography. This makes for considerable repetition but allows chapters to stand alone and still be understood. A single index covers all chapters. Numerous references are cited but the most recent are 2002. Illustrations are not numerous, but most are clear and informative. Few color figures are used. The font size is small and margins narrow, so there is little wasted space. Most chapters are lucidly written. Almost all of the numerous authors are established investigators.
Assessment: This is a valuable book. As is true for any rapidly moving field of science, it was inevitably out of date before even rolling off the press. However, it provides a secure foundation for rapidly updating (by PubMed searches of bibliographic citations, and so forth). Every substantial biomedical library should have this book.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Edgar F. Allin, MD (Midwestern University)
Description: "This is a compilation of 26 invited chapters by 73 authors from 11 countries, synopsizing many aspects of the normal and pathological genetics and epigenetics of bone and cartilage. "
Purpose: The goal is "to provide researchers and students with an overview of selected topics of current interest in bone biology and to stimulate their interest in this fascinating and diverse field." In view of the ongoing exponential increase in information on the molecular and developmental biology of skeletal tissues, this is a very worthy aim, and is quite successfully met.
Audience: Most undergraduates, medical students, and clinicians will find this book too advanced or research-oriented for their liking. However, more sophisticated students and inquisitive clinicians should find much of interest and relevance to fields as varied as environmental toxicology, dysmorphogenesis, biomedical engineering, obstetrics, geriatrics, and oncology.
Features: Much attention is given to the agents controlling chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, from intercellular signaling molecules to the regulation of gene expression by transcription factors and post-transcriptional modification of gene products. Bone deposition, resorption, remodeling, and mineralization are all addressed. A very extensive tabulation is presented of human genetic disorders affecting the skeleton and, where known, their probable mechanisms. Several major disorders are considered in some detail. One chapter focuses on effects of disuse, in particular "microgravity" (weightlessness would be a preferable term, given that objects in near-earth orbit are acted on by virtually undiminished gravitational forces but are in continuous free fall). Another chapter extensively surveys prenatal mineral metabolism. There is no glossary but technical terms and acronyms are reintroduced in each chapter, and each chapter has its own bibliography. This makes for considerable repetition but allows chapters to stand alone and still be understood. A single index covers all chapters. Numerous references are cited but the most recent are 2002. Illustrations are not numerous, but most are clear and informative. Few color figures are used. The font size is small and margins narrow, so there is little wasted space. Most chapters are lucidly written. Almost all of the numerous authors are established investigators.
Assessment: This is a valuable book. As is true for any rapidly moving field of science, it was inevitably out of date before even rolling off the press. However, it provides a secure foundation for rapidly updating (by PubMed searches of bibliographic citations, and so forth). Every substantial biomedical library should have this book.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781617374272
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
  • Publication date: 11/5/2010
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 428
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.91 (d)

Table of Contents

I. Chondrogenesis, Chondrocytes, and Cartilage

Molecular Basis of Cell-Cell Interaction and Signaling in Mesenchymal Chondrogenesis
Rocky S. Tuan

Chondrocyte Cell Fate Determination in Response to Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling
Lillian Shum, Yuji Hatakeyama, Julius Leyton, and Kazuaki Nonaka

Regulation of Chondrocyte Differentiation
Andreia M. Ionescu, M. Hicham Drissi, and Regis J. O'Keefe

Continuous Expression of Cbfa1 in Nonhypertrophic Chondrocytes Uncovers Its Ability to Induce Hypertrophic Chondrocyte Differentiation and Partially Rescues Cbfa1-Deficient Mice
Shu Takeda, Jean-Pierre Bonnamy, Michael J. Owen, Patricia Ducy, and Gerard Karsenty

Molecular Biology and Biosynthesis of Collagens
Johanna Myllyharju

Mechanotransduction Pathways in Cartilage
Qian Chen

II. Control of Skeletal Development

Molecular Genetic Analysis of the Role of the HoxD Complex in Skeletal Development: Impact of the loxP/Cre System in Targeted Mutagenesis of the Mouse HoxD Complex
Marie Kmita, Denis Duboule, and József Zákány

Control of Development and Homeostasis Via Regulation of BMP, Wnt, and Hedgehog Signaling
Renee Hackenmiller, Catherine Degnin, and Jan Christian

FGF4 and Skeletal Morphogenesis
Valerie Ngo-Muller, Shaoguang Li, Scott A. Schaller, Manjong Han, Jennifer Farrington, Minoru Omi, Rosalie Anderson, and Ken Muneoka

Retinoid Signaling and Skeletal Development
Andrea D. Weston and T. Michael Underhill

Retinoids and Indian Hedgehog Orchestrate Long Bone Development
Maurizio Pacifici, Chiara Gentili, Eleanor Golden, and Eiki Koyama

III. Osteoblastic Cell Differentiation

Synergy Between Osteogenic Protein-1 and Osteotropic Factors in the Stimulation of Rat Osteoblastic Cell Differentiation
John C. Lee and Lee-Chuan C. Yeh

Bone MorphogenicProteins, Osteoblast Differentiation, and Cell Survival During Osteogenesis
Cun-Yu Wang

Osteoclast Differentiation
Sakamuri V. Reddy and G. David Roodman

IV. Bone Induction, Growth, and Remodeling

Soluble Signals and Insoluble Substrata: Novel Molecular Cues Instructing the Induction of Bone
Ugo Ripamonti, Nathaniel L. Ramoshebi, Janet Patton, Thato Matsaba, June Teare, and Louise Renton

Perichondrial and Periosteal Regulation of Endochondral Growth
Dana L. Di Nino and Thomas F. Linsenmayer

Computer Simulations of Cancellous Bone Remodeling
Jacqueline C. van der Linden, Harrie Weinans, and Jan A. N. Verhaar

Effects of Microgravity on Skeletal Remodeling and Bone Cells
Pierre J. Marie

V. Bone Mineralization

Quantitative Analyses of the Development of Different Hard Tissues
Siegfried Arnold, Hans J. Höhling, and Ulrich Plate

Fetal Mineral Homeostasis and Skeletal Mineralization
Christopher S. Kovacs

Control of Osteoblast Function and Bone Extracellular Matrix Mineralization by Vitamin D
Johannes P. T. M. van Leeuwen, Marjolein van Driel, and Hulbert A. P. Pols

VI. Skeletal Dysmorphology

Role of Pax3 and PDGF-a Receptor in Skeletal Morphogenesis and Facial Clefting
Simon J. Conway

Genetics of Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia
Giedre Grigelioniene

Effects of Boric Acid on Hox Gene Expression and the Axial Skeleton in the Developing Rat
Michael G. Narotsky, Nathalie Wéry, Bonnie T. Hamby, Deborah S. Best, Nathalie Pacico, Jacques J. Picard, Françoise Gofflot, and Robert J. Kavlock

Toxicant-Induced Lumbar and Cervical Ribs in Rodents
John M. Rogers, R. Woodrow Setzer, and Neil Chernoff

Experimental Skeletal Dysmorphology: Risk Assessment Issues
Rochelle W. Tyl, Melissa C. Marr, and Christina B. Myers

Index

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