The Sloppy Copy Slipup

The Sloppy Copy Slipup

4.0 3
by DyAnne DiSalvo
     
 

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Brian Higman, also known as Big Hig, has a problem. He does not have his sloppy copy writing assignment ready to turn in, and his teacher, Miss Fromme, is not one to listen to excuses. But Brian has really good reasons this time. Between the antics of his impossible five-year-old brother and his teenage brother's rock-and-roll band rehearsing at his house, not to

Overview

Brian Higman, also known as Big Hig, has a problem. He does not have his sloppy copy writing assignment ready to turn in, and his teacher, Miss Fromme, is not one to listen to excuses. But Brian has really good reasons this time. Between the antics of his impossible five-year-old brother and his teenage brother's rock-and-roll band rehearsing at his house, not to mention the fact that his life savings have gone missing, it was impossible to get any homework done over the weekend. It takes all of Brian's imaginative powers and storytelling techniques to prevent him from getting a zero. And it takes some inspiration on Miss Fromme's part to coax Brian into turning his excuses into an actual sloppy copy.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Patrice Russo Belotte
Brian "Big Hig" Higman has failed to complete another writing assignment for class. His teacher, Miss Fromme, who is better known as the "The General," is not a teacher Brian wants to disappoint. Unable to start the assignment because he cannot find something to write about, Brian is suddenly able to find a well-developed story to deliver as his excuse. Along the way, Brian is sure to include all the careful details that "The General" requires for good writing. Exciting details and creative, figurative language highlight Brian's story from beginning to end. Between new puppies, a younger brother wearing clothespins, a lost sock, and a devotion to starting his own band, Brian takes up most of the school day telling his tale. His storytelling ability captivates not just "The General," but his entire class, as well. Reviewer: Patrice Russo Belotte
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Brian Higman, aka Big Hig, has a big problem. He doesn't have the rough draft (sloppy copy) of his writing assignment ready to turn in. He has a reason, but his teacher brooks no excuses. What's he going to do? In a straightforward narrative, Brian tells Miss Fromme and his classmates the story of his frenetic weekend, which involved one emergency after another, essentially creating a "verbal sloppy copy." Sprinkled throughout the text are headlines and articles that Brian imagines he would use if he were writing for a newspaper. The tale is peppered with the funny antics of Brian's pesky little brother and his dog, Patches. The plot is clever and original, though the narrator's storytelling skills seem well above elementary level. The last chapter presents "Big Hig's `Facts' for Writing," tips that could help any student with an assignment. Humorous black-and-white drawings appear throughout. The book's storytelling aspects are reminiscent of those in Lois Lowry's Gooney Bird Green (Houghton, 2002).-Elaine Lesh Morgan, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
As Brian Higman, alias the Big Hig, tells it, he's due a detention, because he can't turn in his English homework to "The General," his fourth-grade teacher Miss Fromme. He tries to outmaneuver her using all legitimate ploys to sidetrack her, but in the effort of explaining why his homework isn't done, he discovers his stories have riveted friends, school staff and the principal; even Miss Fromme is begging to hear more. Full of nuclear family hijinks, this first-person narrative multitasks as a great slice of life from a funny nine-year-old boy, encouragement for reluctant writers and instruction on how to write an interesting and satisfying story. Supporting an atmosphere for creative writing, DiSalvo developed fun-loving characters and a well-paced plot with her usual aplomb. (Fiction. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823421893
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
07/28/2008
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
103
Sales rank:
417,337
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
590L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

DyAnne DiSalvo was inspired to create this story by her experiences teaching writing workshops in schools. Her collection of well-received picture books includes "A Dog Like Jack", winner of the Irma S. and James H. Black Award for Excellence in Children's Literature, and "Spaghetti Park". She lives in the Philadephia metropolitan area. Her website is www.dyannedisalvo.com.

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The Sloppy Copy Slipup 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like this book because it is really funny like how the boy trys to right his paper but first off he dont even know what a essay is and second of he has horrible hand writting. when he asks his friends what to do they say just right how your summer vaction was he goes well it was good. Well right it down then. How? Wow just ask your teacher. He just gets in so much trouble its a histerical book you got to read it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
all i can say about this book is,IN A GOOD WAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! genious i tell you genious
Guest More than 1 year ago
I¿ve never got a zero on a school paper but reading ¿Sloppy Copy Slip-Up¿ made me feel as if I did. Dyanne Disalvo used descriptive writing in this book. This book was fictional and is probably good for ages 8-11. I think that this book¿s theme deals with schoolwork and telling the truth. The problem this book addresses is getting a zero on a paper. The main character, Brian Higman, got a zero on a homework assignment and he is telling Mrs. Fromme, his teacher, why he couldn¿t do the assignment. I would say this book is entertaining because you don¿t know if Brian will get a second chance. I agree with all of the author¿s messages. One of which is that the author lets Brian¿s problems work out. I think this sends out a good message. That message is that you should always tell the truth and sometimes everything will work out. One possibility the book suggests is to tell the truth and you might be rewarded. To support my agreement with the author I think of ¿The Boy Who Cried Wolf¿ story. In that story, the boy doesn¿t tell the truth and then when he is telling the truth no one believes him. The book affected me by seeing what Brian went through just by not doing his homework and it made me feel like I wouldn¿t want a zero even more. I thought this was a good book and very believable. If you want to see what happens in ¿Sloppy Copy Slip-Up¿, you¿ll have to get a copy of ¿Sloppy Copy Slip-Up¿.