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The Soggy Town of Hilltop

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Overview

"You want us to do what?!" This fun, rhyming picture book teaches more than just a new way to drink water. The High Council of Hilltop wants the people to learn a new way to drink. But when the people find out why, everyone has something new to learn.
Suggested age range for readers Ages 4-10
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More About This Book

Overview

"You want us to do what?!" This fun, rhyming picture book teaches more than just a new way to drink water. The High Council of Hilltop wants the people to learn a new way to drink. But when the people find out why, everyone has something new to learn.
Suggested age range for readers Ages 4-10
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616330415
  • Publisher: Guardian Angel Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/13/2010
  • Pages: 20
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.05 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 9, 2010

    illustrates the dangers of peer pressure

    Can you imagine a town full of people who try to drink by pouring water on the top of their heads? In the hamlet of Hilltop, the High Council rules the people and passes rules on what to wear, what to eat, and where to live. But after a while, they have nothing to do, so the Head of the Council suggests making a new rule that all people must drink from the top of their heads, so he pours water on his head and sticks out his tongue to demonstrate. As a result of the new rule, the people are always soggy but also very thirsty. They squish when they walk, grow mushrooms in their shoes during summer, and have huge icicles hanging from their noses in winter. Then one day, a young boy from the south asks "Why?" What will the people do now?
    The rhyming text by Kevin McNamee, who also wrote If I Could Be Anything and The Sister Exchange among others, along with the distinctive pictures by Eugene Noble, who has illustrated several other books including Carol J. Douglas's Cats of Many Colors, present a rollicking tale that is very reminiscent of Hans Christian Anderson's "The Emperor's New Clothes." Yes, children must learn to obey their parents (Ephesians 6:1). And we all need to obey the laws of the land (Romans 13:1). But as young people grow there comes a time when they must understand that "we ought to obey God rather than men" (Acts 5:28). Rather than teaching us a new way to drink, The Soggy Town of Hilltop illustrates the danger, and sometimes even the stupidity, of bowing to peer pressure, something that both youngsters and adults should remember.

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  • Posted June 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Reclaim your life and independence

    The Soggy Town of Hilltop brings to life the hysterical world of the town councilors and townsfolk. Bored with no further rules to instill, the High Council creates an absurd rule for their own amusement to see if the residents will continue to obey. Obey they do and chaos ensues, until the day one young boy from the South comes to visit.

    Wise beyond his years this youngster guides the townsfolk towards reclaiming their lives and independence. What becomes of the High Council and do the townsfolk prevail? Find out while you venture through The Soggy Town of Hilltop and be sure to wear your boots so you don't get wet too.

    Told in amusing rhyme, children's author Kevin McNamee will have the reader laughing out loud and wondering how people would follow ridiculous rules so blindly. Coupled with the unique illustrations by Eugene Ruble, The Soggy Town of Hilltop will soon be a must have for our young muses.

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