The Song of Achilles
  • The Song of Achilles
  • The Song of Achilles

The Song of Achilles

4.1 121
by Madeline Miller
     
 

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Achilles, "the best of all the Greeks," son of the cruel sea goddess Thetis and the legendary king Peleus, is strong, swift, and beautiful— irresistible to all who meet him. Patroclus is an awkward young prince, exiled from his homeland after an act of shocking violence. Brought together by chance, they forge an inseparable bond, despite risking the gods'

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Overview

Achilles, "the best of all the Greeks," son of the cruel sea goddess Thetis and the legendary king Peleus, is strong, swift, and beautiful— irresistible to all who meet him. Patroclus is an awkward young prince, exiled from his homeland after an act of shocking violence. Brought together by chance, they forge an inseparable bond, despite risking the gods' wrath.

They are trained by the centaur Chiron in the arts of war and medicine, but when word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped, all the heroes of Greece are called upon to lay siege to Troy in her name. Seduced by the promise of a glorious destiny, Achilles joins their cause, and torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus follows. Little do they know that the cruel Fates will test them both as never before and demand a terrible sacrifice.

Editorial Reviews

O Magazine
"You don’t need to be familiar with Homer’s The Iliad (or Brad Pitt’s Troy, for that matter) to find Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles spellbinding....her explorations of ego, grief, and love’s many permutations are both familiar and new....[A] timeless love story."
J. K. Rowling
“I loved it.”
J.K. Rowling
“I loved it.”
Time Magazine
"Wildly romantic [and] surprisingly suspenseful....[B]ringing those dark figures back to life, making them men again, and while she’s at it, us[ing] her passionate companion piece to The Iliad as a subtle swipe at today’s ongoing debate over gay marriage. Talk about updating the classics."
Donna Tartt
“A captivating retelling of THE ILIAD and events leading up to it through the point of view of Patroclus: it’s a hard book to put down, and any classicist will be enthralled by her characterisation of the goddess Thetis, which carries the true savagery and chill of antiquity.”
Helen Simonson
“I loved this book. The language was timeless, the historical details were slipped in perfectly. I hope SONG OF ACHILLES becomes part of the high school summer reading lists alongside PENELOPIAD.”
Emma Donoghue
“Mary Renault lives again! A ravishingly vivid and convincing version of one of the most legendary of love stories.”
Ann Patchett
“At once a scholar’s homage to THE ILIAD and a startlingly original work of art by an incredibly talented new novelist. Madeline Miller has given us her own fresh take on the Trojan war and its heroes. The result is a book I could not put down.”
Catherine Conybeare
“Although the details of the story are Miller’s own, the world is one that all who love the Iliad and its epigones will recognize. Reading this book recalled me to the breathless sense of the ancient-yet-present that I felt when I first fell in love with the classics.”
Zachary Mason
“THE ILIAD turns on Achilles’ pride and his relationship with Patroclus, but Homer is sparing with the personal—so much so that, though we believe in their friendship, we do not understand it. THE SONG OF ACHILLES brings light to their love. This is a beautiful book.”
USA Today
“Fast, true and incredibly rewarding…A remarkable achievement.”
Time magazine
“Wildly romantic [and] surprisingly suspenseful....[B]ringing those dark figures back to life, making them men again, and while she’s at it, us[ing] her passionate companion piece to The Iliad as a subtle swipe at today’s ongoing debate over gay marriage. Talk about updating the classics.”
Wall Street Journal
“One of the best novelistic adaptations of Homer in recent memory, and it offers strikingly well-rounded and compassionate portrait of Achilles....[Miller] injects a newfound sense of suspense into a story with an ending that has already been determined.”
Boston Globe
“Powerful, inventive, passionate, and beautifully written. ”
Washington Post
“Beautifully done. . ..In prose as clean and spare as the driving poetry of Homer, Miller captures the intensity and devotion of adolescent friendship and lets us believe in these long-dead boys...deepening and enriching a tale that has been told for 3,000 years.”
Vogue
“A psychologically astute Iliad prelude featuring the heady, star-crossed adolescence of future heroes Patroclus and Achilles.”
O magazine
“You don’t need to be familiar with Homer’s The Iliad (or Brad Pitt’s Troy, for that matter) to find Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles spellbinding....her explorations of ego, grief, and love’s many permutations are both familiar and new....[A] timeless love story.”
Dallas Morning News
“Madeline Miller’s brilliant first novel...is a story of great, passionate love between Achilles and Patroclus....[R]ewriting the Western world’s first and greatest war novel is an awesome task to undertake. That she did it with such grace, style and suspense is astonishing.”
Washington Independent Review of Books
“The Song of Achilles...should be read and enjoyed for itself, but if Madeline Miller’s novel sends the reader back to Homer and his successors, she is to be thanked for that as well.”
The Independent
“Miller somehow (and breathtakingly so) mixes high-action commercial plotting with writing of such beautiful delicacy you sometimes have to stop and stare.”
The Guardian
“Miller’s prose is more poetic than almost any translation of Homer… This is a deeply affecting version of the Achilles story: a fully three-dimension man - a son, a father, husband and lover - now exists where a superhero previously stood and fought.”
London Times Literary Supplement
“In the tradition of Mary Renault... Miller draws on her knowledge of classical sources wisely… Well-paced, engaging and tasteful.”
Daily Mail
“Extraordinary… Beautifully descriptive and heartachingly lyrical, this is a love story as sensitive and intuitive as any you will find.”
Mary Doria Russell
In prose as clean and spare as the driving poetry of Homer, Miller captures the intensity and devotion of adolescent friendship and lets us believe in these long-dead boys for whom sea nymphs and centaurs are not legend but lived reality. In doing so, she will make their names known to yet another generation, deepening and enriching a tale that has been told for 3,000 years.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
Following in Mary Renault’s footsteps and adding some surefooted steps of her own, Miller debuts with a novel that combines the poetic drama of The Iliad with a 21st-century understanding of war, sex, sexual politics, and Trojan War heroism. Miller’s tale begins with Patroclus’ unhappy childhood as the disappointing son of an ambitious king. Exiled to Phthia, the 10-year-old is befriended by confident Prince Achilles. Over time their friendship blooms into love, while Achilles’ mother, the sea nymph Thetis, grows jealously resentful. Patroclus and Achilles follow Agamemnon to recapture Helen from Troy, but the siege wears heavily on Achilles, who awaits the destiny his mother has foretold and his mentor, the centaur Master Chiron, has forewarned: to become the greatest of Greek warriors. In addition to the central story of Achilles and Patroclus, Miller offers a complex study of Briseis, the trophy beauty who inspires a rift between Achilles and Agamemnon; evokes Iphigenia’s sacrifice at Aulis in one quick, brutal image; and probes relationships Homer only hinted at. With language both evocative of her predecessors and fresh, and through familiar scenes that explore new territory, this first-time novelist masterfully brings to life an imaginative yet informed vision of ancient Greece featuring divinely human gods and larger-than-life mortals. She breaks new ground retelling one of the world’s oldest stories about men in love and war, but it is the extraordinary women—Iphigenia, Briseis, and Thetis—who promise readers remarkable things to come as Miller carves out a custom-made niche in historical fiction. Agent: Barer Literary. (Mar.)
Library Journal
Patroclus is an awkward, exiled young prince; golden Achilles is the much-admired son of a sea goddess. In telling the story of their intense friendship and love, debut novelist Miller brings Homer’s ancient Greece to glorious life and offers a “masterly vision of the valor, drama, and tragedy of the Trojan War.” Her reinterpretation of The Iliad deservedly won the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction. (LJ 11/15/11)—Wilda Williams

(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062060624
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/28/2012
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
18,924
Product dimensions:
5.38(w) x 7.82(h) x 0.96(d)

What People are saying about this

Helen Simonson
“I loved this book. The language was timeless, the historical details were slipped in perfectly. I hope SONG OF ACHILLES becomes part of the high school summer reading lists alongside PENELOPIAD.”
Zachary Mason
“THE ILIAD turns on Achilles’ pride and his relationship with Patroclus, but Homer is sparing with the personal—so much so that, though we believe in their friendship, we do not understand it. THE SONG OF ACHILLES brings light to their love. This is a beautiful book.”
Emma Donoghue
“Mary Renault lives again! A ravishingly vivid and convincing version of one of the most legendary of love stories.”
J.K. Rowling
“I loved it.”
Catherine Conybeare
“Although the details of the story are Miller’s own, the world is one that all who love the Iliad and its epigones will recognize. Reading this book recalled me to the breathless sense of the ancient-yet-present that I felt when I first fell in love with the classics.”
Ann Patchett
“At once a scholar’s homage to THE ILIAD and a startlingly original work of art by an incredibly talented new novelist. Madeline Miller has given us her own fresh take on the Trojan war and its heroes. The result is a book I could not put down.”
Donna Tartt
“A captivating retelling of THE ILIAD and events leading up to it through the point of view of Patroclus: it’s a hard book to put down, and any classicist will be enthralled by her characterisation of the goddess Thetis, which carries the true savagery and chill of antiquity.”

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Meet the Author

Madeline Miller grew up in Philadelphia, has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Latin and Ancient Greek from Brown University, and has been teaching both languages for the past nine years. She has also studied at the Yale School of Drama, specializing in adapting classical tales for a modern audience. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Song of Achilles is her first novel.

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The Song of Achilles 4.1 out of 5 based on 3 ratings. 121 reviews.
dearreaderCT More than 1 year ago
This was a wonderful book.. It was impossible to put down. Homer's epic is vividly retold, full of drama, gods and men, triumph and in the end pity and tragedy. For anyone interested in the Classics this is essential reading. It is one of the finest novels I have ever read.
Sain More than 1 year ago
To simply put, it is a great book for a fan of Greek mythology. A nice retelling of the Iliad. Rarely do I re-read books or chapters within books, but this novel is an exception.
LeahPetersen More than 1 year ago
If I could give this an extra star past "I love it!" I would, because it accomplished something that I hardly ever find. It made me cry. Sobbed through the last five pages, could barely see to read the words. It's even more amazing to me that I cried at the ending of a story that I "knew" the ending of before I started it. But even if you know the Iliad, you don't really know this ending, because this book wasn't about the long war, or the heroes who fought in it, or the trials and adventures they faced. This book was about Achilles and Patroclus. Yes, all of the above served as the supporting cast and framework in which their story took place, but this is a love story. On top of that, it's told by the character we never really knew, Patroclus. His view of the war and how it plays out is nothing like those who fought in it for glory or honor or to serve the gods' ends. You get to see the human side of the story. And it's amazingly done. I've seen some say it's slow, and as an action-filled story of a great war and the acts of great heroes, sure, it would be. That's not the kind of book it is, though, and as a love story it is paced beautifully. The author's ability to evoke setting and atmosphere and pure, mercilessly intense emotion is the wonder of this book. I will admit, the seemingly random flipping back and forth from present tense to past tense for no reason I could ever figure out, was a distraction, but aside from making me pause and adjust from time to time, it was nothing compared to the power of the story. Yes, you know what's going to happen and how it's going to end. But you have no idea.
RBJ1 More than 1 year ago
Miller’s ‘The Song of Achilles’: A review Human Emotions ‘The song of Achilles’ is the story of the mythical Greek hero by Margaret Miller. Based on the ancient classic Iliad by Homer, the author has brought to life the myth of Achilles. It is written from the point of view of Patroclus , a minor figure in the epic, and has a very humanistic approach to the story. It explores the relationship between the two men with the background of popular myth. It tells a dramatic tale of emotions from love, sacrifice, jealousy, hatred and anger which are easy for anyone to identify with. The author depicts the two men as very different people who are drawn to each other. As the narrator, Patroclus describes himself as an awkward lonely young man who is not remarkable in any way. He is not loved by his parents. His father rejects him emotionally for his physical drawbacks and his mother is shown to be mentally unstable. Patroclus grows up unloved and unwanted. When he is nine he accidently kills another boy and is banished from his home to the court of Peleus, King of Phthia. Here he meets Achilles the golden boy. Achilles is everything Patroclus is not. Son of a human and a god he is perfect in every way. Called ‘The best of Greeks’ he is described as a perfect warrior and is destined to be a hero. Achilles singles out Patroclus and despite the differences they develop a strong friendship. Achilles is shown to be very protective of his friend who in turn worships him. As time goes on this friendship becomes stronger and they fall in love. Achilles mother, Thetis who is a goddess of the sea does not approve of this and tries to separate them. Against all odds the two remain committed to each other and overcome all the obstacles. Their love is strong, pure and withstands the tests of time. Meanwhile Helen the queen of Sparta is kidnapped by Trojan prince Paris setting into motion the famous Trojan war. This war is tied to Achilles’s destiny to become a hero. Reluctant at first he finally gives support to Menelus, Helen’s husband, and Agememnon . Patroclus follows him to the battlefield. Not having the disposition of a soldier he uses his knowledge of healing and medicine to tend to the wounded. As the war wears on Achilles becomes disillusioned and refuses to fight. Patroclus is worried as this may reflect badly on Achilles and might tarnish his legacy. Pretending to be Achilles he wears his armor he goes into the battlefield. He gives the ultimate sacrifice, his life, for his love. On hearing this news Achilles flies into a rage and kills Hector fulfilling his destiny. In the end the ashes of the two are intermingled giving them an eternity of togetherness. This story is ultimately of unconditional love and sacrifice. It is simply told but affects the reader in a very deep way. With its mythical background it shows that human emotions have not changed since time immemorial and that love is a very powerful force. It can change destinies.
CaryMorganFrates More than 1 year ago
5+Stars! This is a magnificent book! The Song of Achilles, at its very core, is a huge homage to the mastery and beauty that was, and is Homer’s work. Ms. Miller begins her novel on one basic premise – Homer wrote the truth, and life as he described it was real and without exaggeration, including each of the gods, demi-gods, heroes, villains and all those who fell somewhere in-between. As a writer, I’ve followed many a lead in order to trace a mystery upriver to its logical headwaters. And, as in this case, the conclusions at which I arrived, the answers that best fit all of the questions, may not please everyone, but they certainly hold their own in believability. Lyrically written, faithful in all its details, this book left me soaring, crying, understanding and accepting all at once. This is a book that shall remain on my shelves, to remind me forever what mastery is all about. Exceptionally well done. I purchased this book online and have given this review freely and without compensation of any kind.
The_hibernators More than 1 year ago
A touching love story with adventure On the outside, this book is a retelling of Achilles' actions in Troy; however, Miller has incorporated deeper elements to the well-known story. The Song of Achilles is a celebration of Achilles' humanity, rather than of his God-like martial skills. It is a touching love story between Achilles and his companion Patroclus. It is a story of forgiveness for human flaws. And it shows the reader that sometimes the best part of the story is forgotten in legends. Above all, it's one of those books that sucks you right in...and then leaves you breathless when it's over. Although Song of Achilles is technically fantasy, it is also a book that can be enjoyed by literary snobs and by people who don't know much about Greek mythology. I loved it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Song of Achilles is one of the most beautiful books that I have ever read. Narrated by Patroclus, a side character in the traditional Iliad, The Song of Achilles is the heart-wrenching story of two young men trying to live their lives as they want, despite the fact that both are destined to play a major role in the upcoming Trojan War. As their lives, and the story, evolves, Madeline Miller takes each moment and inortalizes it in words, perfectly capturing the feelings of that moment. The story starts when the boys are eleven, just approaching man-hood. Patroclus is a former prince, extiled to Pythia because he killed the eldest son of a noble family, never to see his home or father again. Achilles is the prince of Pythia, son of the sea goddess Thetis, and he is destined to be the greatest warrior of his age. Soon after they meet, Achilles chooses Patroclus as his companion, man at arms, and friend. The two forge an irevocable bond, becoming so close that only death can keep them apart. The Song of Achilles is the moving retelling of the life of one of the most famed heroes of all time. Unlike in the Iliad, Achilles and Patroclus take center stage, with the Trojan War as the background. Many of the characters are familiar, but the author portrays them with a sense of who they were, enhansing their personalitys, and balancing them against each other. The book is rich in emotion but tastfully done. Nothing is overdone, and the book has a sense of truth, it almost appears like the book is not a book at all, instead it is a window into the lives of two famous heroes for whom war, although it was their life, and the reason for their fame, was never something that they truly desired. Madeline Miller has truly created a masterpiece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great version of story from Patroclus' view.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read this straight through. It's a gripping spin on a classic tale.
emmi331 More than 1 year ago
It's said that Alexander the Great took the story of Achilles and Patroclus as the model for his lifelong love affair with Heraklion. Reading of the combination of intense friendship and erotic love as detailed in this book, it is easy to understand why. Ms. Miller's skill in introducing supernatural characters (a centaur, a sea goddess) and making them seem perfectly acceptable is testimony to her ability to recreate a world that easily accomodates both fantasy and reality. I absolutely could not put this book down, the story was so well told. Filled with action, suspense, and great tenderness, it draws the reader into an ancient world in which close friendship is a treasure not to be taken lightly. The fact that there is a sexual element only adds to the intimacy and loving sense of the relationship between the two young men. And as in so much of mythology, there is the lesson to be learned of the tragic consequences pride can bring, and the futility of human ambition. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is a different reading a book where you know all of the characters and their fates from the start. Every turn of the page just filled me with dread. But I kept on because it was also fascinating to see how hard they fought to get around their fates, and stretch their time together....but the harder they worked the more it sealed their fate. I think this is why I took a break in the middle of reading for a couple days...some days I want a happy ending and some snuggles and puppies, and I knew this book would not give it to me. It would break my heart. So I had to take a couple days to prepare. I am too soft-hearted for all this tragedy. It did break my heart, but I enjoyed every minute of it. It is undeniably Patroclus's story, a story about love and acceptance, and pride, and most of all never losing who you are despite the influences that conspired to change you. Achilles wanted to be someone else. He WAS someone else than who others wanted him to be. His mother wanted him to have glory and fame above all else. And not for him, but for her and her pride. The Kings of Greece wanted him as their hero and tool....but Achilles was underneath it all a gentle person, who loved music and loved to sing. That was his true self and that was who Patroclus always saw. There is a point in the book when Patroclus is asked what it is about him that Achilles loves. He was not handsome, or very smart, nor could he fight, or was of any consequence that anyone could see. What was it? He said he did not know. To me it was simple...Achilles loved him and treasured him because he was the only one that saw him for who he was, and was the one that reminded him of that daily. He did not demand that Achilles be someone he was not. He did not want anything from Achilles, but his love. But even in that, he made no demands. He allowed Achilles to maintain his sense of self even through all the outside influence. As long as Patroclus was there and saw him, understood him, and loved him....Achilles would always be the person he saw as his true self. Not the hero or killer...but that gentle boy that loved music. Yes, he lost contact with that boy near the end and failed to live up to all of Patroclus's expectations of him, he was selfish and jealous,and cruel and above all prideful....but again....due to the love he was able to share with Patroclus...he was able to find that boy he once was again. What a sad and tragic figure he was in this book. He tried so hard. I was rooting for him, even if I knew how it would end up. Achilles mother was wrong just as he said; it was not Patroclus that was the unworthy one. I liked that this was told in Patroclus's point of view...because without him...Achilles would only be seen through his legend...the cold killer....the warrior ...the hero....but like the relationship in the book....through Patroclus...we see him with kinder eyes and through love. That would make Patroclus happy, because it was all he ever wanted right up until the end. For Achilles to be seen as more than his legend, and more than his ability to kill. And isn't that what's love about? Seeing and bringing out the best of each other. Even if we fall short some times, we should never lose site of what it is made u love this person in the first place. Ah, getting sappy. But I loved this book, and I am happy that in the end they got some peace. Those last scenes almost made me cry. Together in life. Together in death finally, what more could anyone ask for
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the best love stories I've ever read. I finished the book then turned right around and started to re-read it. It's that good. The story is beautifully written and reminds us of just how powerful love is.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautiful story,beautifully written. Read this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The best book I have ever read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
By far my favorite.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting take on a classic tale. Vivid detail, character development, and realustic emotions make thids novel a must-read!
Anonymous 7 months ago
Beautifully written. Highly recommended for everyone. I cried at the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book took me so deep into the lives and emotions of its characters. All I can say is "wow"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastically researched, beautifully written, and hauntingly emotional.
ImaginaryReads More than 1 year ago
The first thing I noticed about this book is how rich in emotion it is. More than a story about two warriors who fall in the Trojan War, it is about two boys finding their identity in a time of conflict, heroes, and legends in the making. It is the story about the young man who understood and loved Achilles more than any other mortal of his time. His memories of his childhood days growing up with Achilles reminds us that there is more to the hero than the one who was the greatest warrior of his generation. Patroclus does not have a warrior's built, but he knows how to treasure life. Within lies a tender soul that yearns for recognition and love. Despite any qualms he may have, he follows Achilles unconditionally because Achilles is the first to truly acknowledge and accept him for who he is and without judgment. The two of them are soul mates. And each moment of happiness that they find together is all the more precious because we know from Greek mythology that there is going to be a tragedy at Troy, and Achilles and Patroclus's time on Earth is short-lived. Though narrated by Patroclus, The Song of Achilles is the poignant story of two Greek warriors, as narrated from their childhood days to their fall in the Trojan War. It is about how the events of their era shaped their lives and resulted in the legends that we remember today; it is about the people behind the legends. I recommend this story to those looking for a story with deep roots in Greek Mythology, emotion-rich books, and a tale of friendship and love. This book is going on my Keeper shelf.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite books. If you liked the character Patroclus or Achilles while reading the Iliad, this definitely a book for you. It's beautifully written. I usually take at least a week to finish any book, but this one took me three days- I just couldn't put it down for the life of me. I always say if a book doesn't make you cry, it isn't worth it. This one was definitely worth it. It's enjoyable, quick paced, and an interesting interpretations o the events of the Iliad
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Let's start off with the simple fact that I really enjoyed this book, and to be frank I'm not big on reading. Sure there are flaws, some have criticized that Patroclus narrates with the same language when hes 10 as he does when he's 28 (but seriously guys, what did you expect? For her to write half a dozen chapters the way a 10-12 year old really talks?). It's definitely an easy read (I read it in a day) but it has many different angles and events that keeps the reader on its toes and has great balance. Having Patroclus narrate their lives and relationship from childhood till their deaths definitely made me form an emotional attachment to this couple that I never thought I would for a story based on The Iliad. I found myself rooting for them, in vain of course, even though I knew how the story would end. Sad as the ending is, Miller completes the story leaving the reader somewhat happy, knowing the couple gets to spend eternity together. It has beautiful descriptions of their love, but don't worry, it's not overly sappy. In fact, I can only think of two parts of the book that are, uhhh, descriptive (but not graphic and it she keeps it rather short). Other than that, Miller leaves it to simple implications of them laying in bed together, touching each others faces, or just a kiss, etc. This book gives us a view of their physical/emotional love that is surprising and pleasing, without ever losing site of the setting and its violence and politics. I've already recommended this book to friends and feel that I definitely got my time and money's worth out of it!
FastDad More than 1 year ago
Millers vision of the Iliad through Partoclus eyes. A modern re-telling of an ancient and timeless tale. Miller has done her homework! She takes many 'B' characters from the original poem and weaves more mythology around them. Her choices of story arcs are very complimentary to the original poem. Her story has appeal to fans of classic and fantasy. Well written characters with complex emotions and very human faults. The heroes and villains all have strong well defined archetypes without going over the top. I had to re-read Homer after I finished Song Of Achilles. A fun read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story of Achilles from Patroclus's view is precious, heartwrenching, and beautiful. It is a return to the epic, The Iliad, but as Odysseus cleverly tells the great Achilles' son, that which we call heroic in one age may not be valued in another. Thus is Patroclus the real hero--for his devotion, his kindness, his sense of right. It was a fabulous read, and even at the very end where so many writers fall short, here it is complete and satisfies the reader's sense of story. Knowing the Iliad creates a nice foreshadowing effect, but it is not necessary. It is a love story in its purist form developed even amid the ravages of a ten-year war. This is the best read I've had this summer. (The enhanced version is worth it, having background on the characters, the gods, and interviews with the author. The audo clips did not add to the story, though, because they were excerpts from the coming chapter but placed at the very beginning. Don't bother with them.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Couldn't put this book down.