The Song of Roland

Overview

On 15 August 778, Charlemagne’s army was returning from a successful expedition against Saracen Spain when its rearguard was ambushed in a remote Pyrenean pass. Out of this skirmish arose a stirring tale of war, which was recorded in the oldest extant epic poem in French. The Song of Roland, written by an unknown poet, tells of Charlemagne’s warrior nephew, Lord of the Breton Marches, who valiantly leads his men into battle against the Saracens, but dies in the massacre, defiant to the end. In majestic verses, ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$12.91
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$14.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (117) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $4.90   
  • Used (104) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

On 15 August 778, Charlemagne’s army was returning from a successful expedition against Saracen Spain when its rearguard was ambushed in a remote Pyrenean pass. Out of this skirmish arose a stirring tale of war, which was recorded in the oldest extant epic poem in French. The Song of Roland, written by an unknown poet, tells of Charlemagne’s warrior nephew, Lord of the Breton Marches, who valiantly leads his men into battle against the Saracens, but dies in the massacre, defiant to the end. In majestic verses, the battle becomes a symbolic struggle between Christianity and paganism, while Roland’s last stand is the ultimate expression of honour and feudal values of twelfth-century France.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140440751
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/28/1957
  • Series: Classics Ser.
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 246,969
  • Product dimensions: 5.14 (w) x 7.78 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author

Glyn Burgess teaches at the University of Liverpool. He is an expert on early medieval French literature, and has translated and written widely on this area.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Lest we forget

    This is the story of a battle that became famous in the early middle ages. It is related in poetic form through a French Chanson de Geste or Songs of Deeds. It is a story that had its first telling across campfires by the surviving participants of the battle as it was remembered and discussed for the remainder of their lives and was eventually put in poetic form for later posterity. Every combat veteran should read this book. It still clearly shows that every combat unit has its heroes, sung and unsung. These men can be identified because, when the tough assignment comes, they are always first up for it. A leader even gets to the point where he knows a particular handful of people are grossly over-used, but they are so competent that their presence means less casualties and you have to choose them. The story clearly illustrates the bond between exceptional leaders and their men. It clearly illustrates how exceptionally talented leaders are always ready to step up and take the hard assignments as they come. The story points out the absolute need for a combat leader, in contact, to negotiate an outcome only from a position of strength. One should have the ability to influence the outcome if the opposing force does not keep their word. This story clearly shows the need for scouts on the vanguard, flank security to either side of the unit's movement, and a good rear guard as the unit withdraws Charlemagne lamented Roland's loss so deeply that one can see that Roland was his " go to" man for tough assignments. He was competent and fearless, and sometimes people just like him convince us they are also invulnerable. This is simply not the case and some of our very best men die young. There is no way to glorify war nor should there be. I assure you that this poem can lead to a better understanding of men at battle, their relationships and concerns, and how they act and react in their community of warriors.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)