×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Song Of The Lark
     

The Song Of The Lark

5.0 2
by Willa Cather, Melissa Homestead
 

See All Formats & Editions

Thea Kronberg and her singing voice are headed for great things. But her provincial Colorado town has practically stifled her. Her talent and pioneer's spirit takes Thea to New York, even Germany, but with loneliness as her only companion...

Overview

Thea Kronberg and her singing voice are headed for great things. But her provincial Colorado town has practically stifled her. Her talent and pioneer's spirit takes Thea to New York, even Germany, but with loneliness as her only companion...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101003817
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/06/2007
Series:
Signet Classics Series
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
480
Sales rank:
689,102
File size:
572 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

Vivian Gornick
Cather makes a great romance of the loneliness of the artist's vocation.
Leon Edel
The time will come when she will be ranked above Hemingway.

Meet the Author


Born in Virginia, Willa Cather (1873–1948) moved with her family to Nebraska before she was ten. She graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1895, then taught high school and worked for the Pittsburgh Leader before being appointed associate editor of McClure’s Magazine. Cather published her first novel, Alexander’s Bridge, in 1912. In O Pioneers! (1913), she turned to her greatest subject, immigrant life on the Nebraska prairies, and established herself as a major American novelist. O Pioneers! was followed by other novels, including My Ántonia (1918), The Professor’s House (1922), and Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927).



Melissa Homestead is the Susan J. Rosowski Professor of English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. She is the author of American Women Authors and Literary Property, 1822–1869, and with Guy Reynolds is coeditor of Willa Cather and Modern Cultures.


Born in Virginia, Willa Cather (1873–1948) moved with her family to Nebraska before she was ten. She graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1895, then taught high school and worked for the Pittsburgh Leader before being appointed associate editor of McClure’s Magazine. Cather published her first novel, Alexander’s Bridge, in 1912. In O Pioneers! (1913), she turned to her greatest subject, immigrant life on the Nebraska prairies, and established herself as a major American novelist. O Pioneers! was followed by other novels, including My Ántonia (1918), The Professor’s House (1922), and Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927).



Melissa Homestead is the Susan J. Rosowski Professor of English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. She is the author of American Women Authors and Literary Property, 1822–1869, and with Guy Reynolds is coeditor of Willa Cather and Modern Cultures.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 7, 1873
Date of Death:
April 27, 1947
Place of Birth:
Winchester, Virginia
Place of Death:
New York, New York
Education:
B.A., University of Nebraska, 1895

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Song Of The Lark: 100th Anniversary Edition 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Song of the Lark is a classic and although it is long and at times, difficult to read because of the descriptions of settings, it is a book that profoundly effected me. It is the story of an artist and who she is, what she has to do to become an artist, and what she draws on to create her art. It is insightful and intriguing. You are drawn into the novel and at times, you might want to leave it because it is demanding to read, but stay with it, the passages describing Thea's heart and mind are brilliant and thought provoking. In light of what we have read and learned about the writer, the book takes on an even deeper meaning. Well worth the visit to the past.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago