The Sons of Clovis: (Literary Hoaxes)

The Sons of Clovis: (Literary Hoaxes)

by David Brooks
     
 

A fascinating study of literary hoaxes as part of a wide-ranging journey through literature, culture, and poetics, this book offers a fresh look into Australia’s Ern Malley affair. In the mid 1940s, writers James McAuley and Harold Stewart submitted a series of poems to the modernist literary magazine Angry Penguins under the fictitious name Ern Malley

Overview

A fascinating study of literary hoaxes as part of a wide-ranging journey through literature, culture, and poetics, this book offers a fresh look into Australia’s Ern Malley affair. In the mid 1940s, writers James McAuley and Harold Stewart submitted a series of poems to the modernist literary magazine Angry Penguins under the fictitious name Ern Malley; “Ernest” because they weren't, and “mal” to play on the French word for “bad.” Their aim was to demonstrate their utter disdain for modern poetry by deliberately writing bad verse, hastily concocted by lifting lines from whatever came to hand—a dictionary, an academic paper on mosquito breeding grounds, Shakespeare—blended with self-conscious hints at meaning. In a flurry of excitement, the poems were published in a special edition proclaiming the discovery of an important new Australian voice. Uncovering some astounding evidence that challenges all accepted truths about the hoax and its origins and proves a link between Australian poetry and the French symbolist movement, this revelatory account combines the authority of an academic classic with the narrative tension of a thriller.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780702238840
Publisher:
University of Queensland Press
Publication date:
10/01/2011
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.40(d)

Meet the Author

David Brooks is a professor of Australian literature at the University of Sydney and the author of three novels and several collections of poetry, short fiction, and essays. His second novel, The Fern Tattoo, was shortlisted for the 2008 Miles Franklin Award, and The Balcony, his latest collection of poetry, was shortlisted for the 2009 NSW Premier’s Kenneth Slessor Award. 

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