The Soul and its Instrumental Body: A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Philosophy of Living Nature

The Soul and its Instrumental Body: A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Philosophy of Living Nature

by Bos
     
 

ISBN-10: 9004130160

ISBN-13: 9789004130166

Pub. Date: 03/25/2003

Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers, Inc.

Aristotle's definition of the soul should be interpreted as: 'the soul is the entelechy of a natural body that serves as its instrument'. The theory of a fine-corporeal body makes it much easier to understand Aristotle's position between Plato and the Stoics . This correction puts paid to all theories about a development in Aristotle's thought.

Overview

Aristotle's definition of the soul should be interpreted as: 'the soul is the entelechy of a natural body that serves as its instrument'. The theory of a fine-corporeal body makes it much easier to understand Aristotle's position between Plato and the Stoics . This correction puts paid to all theories about a development in Aristotle's thought.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9789004130166
Publisher:
Brill Academic Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
03/25/2003
Series:
Brill's Studies in Intellectual History Series, #112
Pages:
434
Product dimensions:
6.64(w) x 9.70(h) x 1.29(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. Aristotle’s psychology reconsidered
2. The modern debate on Aristotle’s psychology
3. Pneuma as the organon of the soul in De motu animalium
4. What body is suitable for receiving the soul (De anima I 3, 407b13-26)?
5. Aristotle’s new psychology in De anima II 1-2
6. The soul in its instrumental body as the sailor in his ship (De anima II 1, 413a8-9)
7. Aristotle’s problems with the standard psychological theories
8. The role of vital heat and pneuma in De generatione animalium
9. ‘Fire above’: the relation of the soul to the body that receives soul, in Aristotle’s De longitudine et brevitate vitae 2-3
10. Pneuma and the theory of soul in De mundo
11. The ultimate problem: how did Aristotle relate the intellect, which is not bound up with sôma, to the soul, which is always connected with sôma?
12. Aristotle’s lost works: the consequences of reinterpreting the psychology of De anima
13. The information on Aristotle’s Eudemus
14. The fifth element as the substance of the soul
15. The comparison of the steersman and his ship in Aristotle’s lost works and elsewhere
16. The soul’s ‘bondage’ according to a lost work by Aristotle
17. The integration of the psychology of Aristotle’s Eudemus and his De anima
18. Final considerations and conclusions

Bibliography
Index nominum
Index locorum

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