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The Soul of a Butterfly: Reflections on Life's Journey

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Overview

"During my boxing career, you did not see the real Muhammad Ali. You just saw a little boxing. You saw only a part of me. After I retired from boxing my true work began. I have embarked on a journey of love."

So Muhammad Ali begins this spiritual memoir, his description of the values that have shaped and sustained him and that continue to guide his life. In The Soul of a Butterfly the great champion takes readers on a spiritual journey through ...

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The Soul of a Butterfly: Reflections on Life's Journey

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Overview

"During my boxing career, you did not see the real Muhammad Ali. You just saw a little boxing. You saw only a part of me. After I retired from boxing my true work began. I have embarked on a journey of love."

So Muhammad Ali begins this spiritual memoir, his description of the values that have shaped and sustained him and that continue to guide his life. In The Soul of a Butterfly the great champion takes readers on a spiritual journey through the seasons of life, from childhood to the present, and shares the beliefs that have served him well.
After fighting some of the fiercest bouts in boxing history against Joe Frazier and George Foreman, today Muhammad Ali faces his most powerful foe — outside the boxing ring. Like many people, he battles an illness that limits his physical abilities, but as he says, "I have gained more than I have lost....I have never had a more powerful voice than I have now." Ali reflects on his faith in God and the strength it gave him during his greatest challenge, when he lost the prime years of his boxing career because he would not compromise his beliefs. He describes how his study of true Islam has helped him accept the changes in his life and has brought him to a greater awareness of life's true purpose. As a United Nations "Messenger of Peace," he has traveled widely, and he describes his 2002 mission to Afghanistan to heighten public awareness of that country's desperate situation, as well as his more recent meeting with the Dalai Lama.
Ali's reflections on topics ranging from moral courage to belief in God to respect for those who differ from us will inspire and enlighten all who read them. Written with the assistance of his daughter Hana, The Soul of a Butterfly is a compassionate and heartfelt book that will provide comfort for our troubled times.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Few lives have been more zealously recorded in movies, photography and literature than Ali's. So it's fortunate that this book is not so much a memoir as a collection of the supreme athlete's spiritual contemplations. Structured as a series of minichapters on abstract virtues-love, friendship, peace, wisdom, understanding, respect, etc.-it consists of Ali's religious reflections, buttressed by personal anecdotes, Sufi parables, aphorisms, personal letters and poetry. What might be seen as mawkish or cloying from someone less universally beloved has real poignancy coming from boxing's brashest champion ("The Mouth" was one of his many nicknames), who is slowly being driven behind a wall of silence by Parkinson's. The book has the intensity of a deathbed confessional. Ali is settling his accounts, apologizing to Joe Frazier and Malcolm X for hurting them. But primarily he is giving advice to his many children, for whom he obviously feels an overwhelming love. (His daughter Hana addresses her love for her father directly in the book.) Besides Ali's love, readers will be struck by his remarkable faith. With the Black Muslims, he found not only an expression of his own pride in being black but also a personal relationship with Allah, which served as the wellspring for the remarkable courage he displayed both inside ("The Rumble in the Jungle") and outside (refusing the Vietnam draft) the ring. It's hard not to be moved by Ali's spirit. Photos. Agent, Susan Crawford. (Nov. 16) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Fans of boxing great Muhammad Ali might not know quite what to make of this book. Despite its loosely autobiographical structure, the emphasis is not on Ali the warrior. His triumphs are touched on, but it is a softer side of the man that shows through: an exhausted Ali staying up until dawn doing card tricks for a group of Kinshasa children after his 1974 fight with George Foreman; a repentant Ali including a poem of apology to Joe Frazier. This book is devoted more to homilies, aphorisms, and poems on such matters as love, living a good life, and true happiness-to the extent that it might seem as if Ali is channeling Kahlil Gibran. Readers anxious for a more straightforward work of autobiography like Ali's The Greatest (o.p.) might be disappointed. But those who forgave Ali his cruel toying with Floyd Patterson, joining the controversial Nation of Islam, and verbal abuse of Frazier will forgive him here and be glad that this book affirms the essential decency we always saw in the man. Because it's Ali, there will be demand, so this is recommended for most public libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 2/15/04.]-Jim Burns, Jacksonville P.L., FL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781476747378
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 5/18/2013
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 146,543
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Muhammad Ali is the former three-time world heavyweight boxing champion. He and his wife, Lonnie, have established the Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky, to preserve and share the legacy and ideals of Muhammad Ali. Hana Ali is a writer. She lives in Michigan, near her father and stepmother.

Muhammad Ali is the former three-time world heavyweight boxing champion. He and his wife, Lonnie, have established the Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky, to preserve and share the legacy and ideals of Muhammad Ali. Hana Ali is a writer. She lives in Michigan, near her father and stepmother.

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Read an Excerpt

The Foundation of Life

I can remember, when I was just a kid in Louisville, Kentucky, my mother would wake my brother and me early every Sunday morning. She would come into our room, kiss us on the forehead, and say in a gentle whisper, "Wake up, tinky baby, wake up, Rudy, we're going to thank the Lord!"

My mother would sometimes call me "GG," too, because those were the first syllables I had spoken. After I won the Gold Gloves, I told her that from the very beginning I was trying to say "Golden Gloves." I thought my mother had a tiny little bird nose. I don't know why I thought that, because birds don't have noses, but from the moment I said it we all started calling her Mama Bird. After waking me and Rudy, Bird would cook us a nice breakfast. While we ate, she would iron our best clothes and lay them out on the bed. Then she would call us for a bath. After getting dressed, Rudy and I would go outside to sit on the front porch and shoot marbles before we headed off for Sunday school.

I can remember trying hard not to get dirty. I knew I looked handsome in my freshly ironed shirt and bow tie. When Bird walked out beside my father, Cassius Clay, or Cash, I remember looking up at them with pride, thinking how pretty she looked and how handsome he was with his thick black mustache. Cash would often say to me, "Most men envy me because they can't grow a mustache as long and thick as mine."

What he said has always stuck with me. I think that to him, his mustache was a source of pride. To this day, every so often, I let my own grow.

I had a strong foundation growing up; my parents were loving, affectionate people. Ever since I can remember, my father was always hugging and kissing us. He would say "give me those jaws" (his term for kissing our cheeks). Then he kissed us until our cheeks turned red. Cash always made me feel important. Although, at times my father had a quick temper, and my parents had disagreements, I had a happy home life and I knew that I was loved. My parents made me feel special. When it wasn't my father's affection, it was my mother's stories. Mama Bird was always telling me about the time I was born. She said that I was such a pretty baby, everyone thought I was a girl, and that from the moment they brought me home, Cash was "biting my jaws." My parents weren't perfect, but they each had a loving nature. My father was a painter. He made his living painting murals and signs. Almost every Baptist church around Louisville has his work in them. My father was very talented; I have one of his paintings hanging on my office wall, right above my desk. Cash used to tell people that he wasn't just a painter; he was an artist. Sometimes he would take me and Rudy to work with him. Cash would teach us how to mix the paint and lay out a sign. I could draw a little, but nothing special. It was Rudy that took after Cash. He is an artist, too. Cash used to say that if it weren't for the way things were then, a lot more people would have known what he could do. My father raised us well. He made sure we were surrounded by good people, taught us to always confront the things we feared, and to try to be the best at whatever we did. After delivering his advice, Cash would say, "These are the things my father said to me, and you don't learn them by accident, they have to be taught."

Cash was one of a kind; he was full of life and energy. He loved hugging, kissing, talking, and debating. He was my father and my friend. He was at my side when he could be and we had a lot more good times together than bad.

Sometimes, after school, when we finished our homework, Rudy and I would play outside with some of the other kids in the neighborhood. I used to ask Rudy to throw rocks at me to see if he could hit me. He thought that I was crazy, but no matter how many he threw, he could never hit me. I was too fast. I was running left, and right, ducking, dodging, and jumping out of the way. My brother and I had a lot of fun together, we never really got into fights. My mother used to tell me that when I was about four, whenever she would try to discipline Rudy, I would step in and say, "Don't you spank my baby." Rudy and I have always been close. He's my younger brother and I love him.

I wasn't much trouble as a child, but when I did cut up, Mama Bird just sat me in a corner and put an old bear head rug in the middle of the floor. I was so scared of it, I didn't move an inch. I thought the rug might jump up and bite me. My mother was a gentle lady. She always spoke in a tender voice and I never heard her say a bad thing about anyone. She didn't gossip or meddle in other people's business. She taught us that prejudice was wrong, and to always treat people with love and respect. My mother loved to cook, eat, make clothes, and be with her family. I loved her very much; there's never been anyone better to me in my whole life.

I learned a lot from my parents while I was growing up. I noticed how they remained dignified in the face of injustice. I saw how they responded to the people around them; I witnessed how my mother would forgive, not hate. And how Cash always held his head high and he worked hard. Growing up, we were poor in terms of money, but we were rich to have had so much love and pride in our household. We were raised with strong values and learned the importance of integrity and compassion. More important than the words, I learned by their example.

My mother was a Baptist and my father was a Methodist, but we always went to my mother's church. She taught us everything she believed was true about God. Cash used to say that he let Mama Bird raise us her way, because she was a good Baptist, and that a woman is better than a man, so we should follow our mother.

When I was in junior high school I applied for a job cleaning the blackboards and desks and doing odd jobs at Spalding College in Louisville. Sister James Ella gave me the job. I made a few dollars a week, working under the direction of Sister Ann. Sister James Ella was a sweet lady. She showed me how to clean shelves and sweep the floor. She passed away a few years ago, but I will always remember her. I had a good childhood. There were obstacles, and hardships, but I remained on the straight path. I kept my values in mind, and my faith remained strong. Although my religion would change later in my life, God was always in my heart.

My mother once told me that my confidence in myself made her believe in me. I thought that was funny, because it was her confidence in me that strengthened my belief in myself. I didn't realize it then, but from the very beginning, my parents were helping me build the foundation for my life.

Copyright © 2004 by Muhammad Ali Family Trust

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2007

    The Great Ozzie Davis Returns Ali's Voice to Us!.

    The movie 'Ali' captured much of the excitement and drama that surrounded Muhammad Ali and even some bits of his famous humor, but it didn't really capture why so many people were so passionate about him. Yes, Ali was brave, larger-than-life, outspoken, outrageous, and, of course, the Greatest Boxer of All Timeees. But the real reason we cared about him so deeply was that most of us (at least those of us who -quoting Ali- had eyes in which to see) could tell he was basically a very nice person whose goal was to bring joy and happiness into the lives of everyone he met. Muhammad Ali is a spiritual teacher whose purpose is to inspire others to be the greatest they can be. He has indeed accomplished his goal. Even today, when he is hardly able to audibly speak or walk unaided(his mind, however, remains as clear and sharp as ever) he inspires millions of sick people to rise from their beds, get out into the world, and to live their lives to the fullest they are able. This audio book perhaps tells the story of Ali's lifetime spiritual quest better than any other book out there. The majority of the Ali books (and I have read them all) focus mainly on his many boxing victories and defeats, and while the many victories were thrilling and the rare defeats were heartbreaking, merely recounting them does not capture the true heart and soul of the most recognized man in the history of Planet Earth the way his daughter's loving tribute does. In one of his last performances, the great Ozzie Davis does a magnificent job reading Ali's inspiring and heart-felt words. After a few minutes you forget that it is Ozzie and not Muhammad who is speaking.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2008

    A reviewer

    I have always loved Muhammad Ali. I have never met him but as I read his book the man is just like I always knew he would be, a sincere, loving, caring, godly down to earth person and I love him. His book is so touching and it shows his love for his family and the world. We are blessed to have known such a wonderful man. YOU ARE THE GREATEST! I Love You.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2005

    READ THIS BOOK

    Read this book it realy talk abouty his life. His life was realy fun Ali realy talk to you soul on this Book. ali have some more books that is real good about his life. Ali is a real good person people realy need to here more about what he went throu in his life.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2005

    From the Soul of The Butterfly to the Heart of the Reader...

    Nevermind the boxing exploits of one of if not the greatest, no pun intended, boxers in the history of the sport, 'Butterfly' shows the heart of the most endearing person of our lifetime... as told through the eyes of a loving child. A partial statement...but of course...I absolutely idolize the MAN both inside and moreso outside the squared circle. If I could but just meet him in person and tell him...'he shook up the world!!!'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2004

    Soul review

    I enjoyed reading this quick read. I learned a lot about Muhammad Ali. Just the opening written by his daughter made me cry. I hope you'll enjoy this book.

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    Posted December 19, 2011

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    Posted February 8, 2014

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    Posted August 29, 2014

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    Posted September 14, 2010

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