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Sound of His Own Voice
     

The Sound of His Own Voice

by John Wesley Harding
 

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Now that he's used to living a double life as a musician and a novelist (publishing three books under his given name, Wesley Stace), John Wesley Harding has become more comfortable with leaving his most serious side on the printed page, and while his tenth studio album, The Sound of His Own Voice, shows he still has a point of view and no shyness about

Overview

Now that he's used to living a double life as a musician and a novelist (publishing three books under his given name, Wesley Stace), John Wesley Harding has become more comfortable with leaving his most serious side on the printed page, and while his tenth studio album, The Sound of His Own Voice, shows he still has a point of view and no shyness about expressing it, from a musical standpoint, this is one of his most engaging pieces of pop songcraft since he burst onto the scene with Here Comes the Groom in 1989. Scott McCaughey (who played on Harding's 2009 effort, Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead) co-produced The Sound of His Own Voice with the singer and songwriter, and he brought in an impressive variety of collaborators for these sessions, including Peter Buck, Rosanne Cash, and John Moen, Chris Funk, Jenny Conlee, and Nate Query of the Decemberists, and the results are beautifully crafted and entertainingly eclectic, encompassing the jaunty folk-rock of "Uncle Dad," the nervy rock & roll of "Calling Off the Experiment," the R&B underpinnings of "I Should Have Stopped," and the epic scale finale "The World in Song." Harding's literary efforts have helped hone his already impressive gifts as a lyricist, but while his storytelling is sharp and his wordplay more than clever, he's gained an appreciation for human vulnerabilities that give these songs a warmth even when he points a deserving finger, and his lyrics dovetail well with the expansive (but never overbearing) production and arrangements. There's an amusing irony in the fact that Harding has gotten better at making records now that he's doing it part time, but The Sound of His Own Voice is not only stronger in every respect than Who Was Changed…, it's one of the most consistently satisfying albums of his career, and sounds more like the proper follow-up to the excellent Here Comes the Groom than anything he's made since.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/11/2011
Label:
Yep Roc Records
UPC:
0634457224926
catalogNumber:
2249
Rank:
194322

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

John Wesley Harding   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Harmonica,Electric Guitar,Vocals,Background Vocals,Hand Clapping,Pump Organ,Soloist
Rosanne Cash   Vocal Harmony
Scott McCaughey   Synthesizer,Acoustic Guitar,Percussion,Autoharp,Electric Guitar,Maracas,Electric Piano,Tambourine,Background Vocals,Hand Clapping,Mellotron,cowbell,Tubular Bells,Wurlitzer,Crumar
Peter Buck   Mandolin,12-string Guitar,E-bow,Beat Box,Guitar (Leslie)
Rebecca Gates   Hand Clapping
John Moen   Acoustic Guitar,Drums,Background Vocals,Hand Clapping,Timpani,Vibes
Nate Query   Bass,Cello,Upright Bass
Laura Veirs   Vocals,Background Vocals
Chris Funk   Banjo,Pedal Steel Guitar,Electric Guitar,Hand Clapping,E-bow,Soloist
John Roderick   Background Vocals
Joanna Bolme   Hand Clapping
Jenny Conlee-Drizos   Piano,Accordion,Hammond Organ,Hand Clapping,farfisa organ,Pump Organ,fender rhodes
Tilda Stace   Vocals

Technical Credits

John Wesley Harding   Composer,Producer
Scott McCaughey   Producer,Engineer
Ed Masley   Composer
Adam Selzer   Engineer
Rob Seidenberg   Composer
Matt Gill   Engineer
Jason Quigley   Inside Photo
Jamie Baldridge   Cover Photo

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