The Source of Leadership: Eight Drivers of the High-Impact Leader

The Source of Leadership: Eight Drivers of the High-Impact Leader

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by Michael Gerber
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1572245085

ISBN-13: 9781572245082

Pub. Date: 09/01/2007

Publisher: New Harbinger Publications

Leadership is failing in many forums and failing at an increasing rate as technology accelerates and complicates our existence. Inside, you’ll discover the keys – the source – to embodying and performing the well known but highly elusive traits and functions, respectively, of the high-impact leader. You’ll learn how to develop eight personal

Overview

Leadership is failing in many forums and failing at an increasing rate as technology accelerates and complicates our existence. Inside, you’ll discover the keys – the source – to embodying and performing the well known but highly elusive traits and functions, respectively, of the high-impact leader. You’ll learn how to develop eight personal drivers, energies deep within, each of which drives several of the traits and functions of the high-impact effective leader:

  • Presence,
  • Clarity of thought, emotion, and behavior
  • Openness
  • Intention
  • Personal responsibility
  • Intuition
  • Creativity
  • Connected communication

With the burgeoning trend toward seeking a deeper grounding personally as a means of performing better professionally, The Source of Leadership is the early "defining voice" of this new leadership discipline. (See www.thesourceofleadership.com) 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781572245082
Publisher:
New Harbinger Publications
Publication date:
09/01/2007
Series:
Unassigned Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

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The Source of Leadership: Eight Drivers of the High-Impact Leader 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is a disclaimer from the publisher in the front of this book for a good reason. Traversi states he has been to a therapist, but I doubt it with his lack of self-evaluation and inconsistency. He also does not understand Carl Jung's shadow concept is about integration of the whole person. Traversi fails to understand the shadow is essentially about being self-accepting and not about avoidance. Traversi has a judgemental tone with his accounts that I found disturbing and lacking in compassion. Traversi's eight 'drivers' make sense, but he does not back them up with anything to sustain them accept self-help pop psycho nonsense and an anti-social excercise.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Too often self-help books stimulate the reader while the pages turn, but after the back cover closes the session is over and on we go. David M. Traversi avoids that route in publishing a book, the result of his years as a motivational speaker and writer and coach, that on the surface is a primer for executive search teams to determine who among the hundreds of applicants for CEO jobs deserve to be termed 'leaders', but for the average leader, Traversi has written an extremely user friendly manual that allows the reader to open the potential of personal lives to be everything each of us can be. It is stimulating reading and an enormously helpful guide for self-improvement. Traversi talks about the 'persona' and the 'shadow' aspects of our personalities: the 'persona' is what we present to the world while the 'shadow' contains the 'personality and behavior energies that have been repressed from consciousness, usually since childhood.' Once he has aided the reader in determining self-evaluation he begins his steps to empower and explore the myriad possibilities within each of us that not only direct toward discovering the secrets of Leadership, but in reality lead us down a well constructed path toward fulfilling the potential in each of us. His chapters by name tell the process direction: Presence, Openness, Clarity, Personal Responsibility, Intuition, Creativity, and Connected Communication: it becomes apparent that the method is first, self-evaluation and then transposing those newfound traits into the qualities needed in 'high-impact leaders.' Traversi's layout of his information is clear, unencumbered, and supported by not only excellent definitions but also by examples of each added trait as demonstrated in 'case reports.' The importance of this volume in aiding recruiters to identify true leaders is a given. What impresses this reader is the usefulness of the book in seriously testing and diagnosing and treating the individual to succeed in living in the present and altering attitudes and habits to open windows to a far more successful mode of living, communication, working - and leading! Grady Harp