The South Vs. The South: How Anti-Confederate Southerners Shaped the Course of the Civil War

Overview

Why did the Confederacy lose the Civil War? Most historians point to the larger number of Union troops, or to the North's greater industrial might. Now, in The South Vs. the South, a leading authority on the Civil War era offers a critical supplementary viewpoint. William Freehling argues that 450,000 Union troops from the South—especially border state whites and southern blacks—helped cost the Confederacy the war. In addition, when the southern border states rejected the Confederacy, half the South's industrial ...

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The South Vs. The South: How Anti-Confederate Southerners Shaped the Course of the Civil War

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Overview

Why did the Confederacy lose the Civil War? Most historians point to the larger number of Union troops, or to the North's greater industrial might. Now, in The South Vs. the South, a leading authority on the Civil War era offers a critical supplementary viewpoint. William Freehling argues that 450,000 Union troops from the South—especially border state whites and southern blacks—helped cost the Confederacy the war. In addition, when the southern border states rejected the Confederacy, half the South's industrial capacity swelled the North's advantage. Whether revising our conception of Union military strategy or of slavery, or changing our perceptions of blacks' role in producing Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, or finding new meanings in what is arguably America's greatest piece of sculpture, Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial, or establishing the antecedents to Martin Luther King, Jr., Freehling's piercing insight and rhetorical verve yield a major new Civil War narrative.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An important book that sheds new light on white southern divisions and especially highlights the contribution of escaping slaves to Union victory."—The American Historical Review

"A convincing case."—Seattle Times

"Thoroughly and exquisitely researched. Freehling's analysis is provocative and novel."—Library Journal

"A valuable contribution to Civil War literature."—Publishers Weekly

"Together with his own inimitable style of expression and fertility of mind, William W. Freehling has combined excellent research with a keen reading of recent works to offer an original theory for the Confederate loss in the Civil War....In this fine book, Freehling has made a major contribution to Civil War studies."—Civil War Book Review

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195156294
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 11/14/2002
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 446,809
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 5.30 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

William W. Freehling, Singletary Professor of the Humanities at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, has won the Nevins, Bancroft, and Owsley Prizes for his previous Oxford University Press books.

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Table of Contents

Preface xi
Part 1 The Other House Divided
1 The Union's Task 3
2 Fault Lines in the Pre--Civil War South 17
3 The Secession Crisis 33
Part 2 Southern White Anti-Confederates
4 From Neutrality to Unionism 47
5 The Jackpot 65
Part 3 Southern Black Anti-Confederates
6 The Delay 85
7 The Collaboration 115
8 The Harvest 141
Part 4 Last Full Measure
9 The Last Best Hope 177
10 The Taproot and Its Blight 201
Notes 207
Index 231
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2008

    Great Book

    This book is a must read for anyone who loves history or the Civil War. I would also recommend this book for any high school students studying the Civil War

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2003

    Antidote to an Excess of War Stories

    In this book Professor Freehling offers the serious student of the most turbulent period of our history an alternative view of the Civil War. He treats the major battles of the war in the context of the southern reaction to that largest segment of the anit-Confederate South -- the black southerner-- and the hesitancy of the North to use this weapon against the loyal South. The title does not do complete justice to the book which shows how the 'Anti-Confederate Southerners' shaped the course of the Civil War in the North as well. A slender book, trimmed of unnecessary fat, but written in a narrative style that is typically Freehling.

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