The Spirit of America: Patriotic Monologues and Speeches for Middle and High School Students

Overview

Spirit of America is an inspiring collection of patriotic speeches and writings ideal for middle and high school speech and forensics classes, assemblies, and creative performance events. Some of the greatest personalities, from Plato to Ronald Reagan, speak passionately about the timeless issues of our age: freedom, democracy, and individual rights. They address what their country means to them-the greatness they see within it and their visions of what their country may become. This book contains a range of ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $7.12   
  • Used (4) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Spirit of America is an inspiring collection of patriotic speeches and writings ideal for middle and high school speech and forensics classes, assemblies, and creative performance events. Some of the greatest personalities, from Plato to Ronald Reagan, speak passionately about the timeless issues of our age: freedom, democracy, and individual rights. They address what their country means to them-the greatness they see within it and their visions of what their country may become. This book contains a range of famous material, including Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, Plato's The Republic, Geronimo's Story of His Life, Susan B. Anthony's Speech on Women's Rights to Vote, Maya Angelou's poem "On the Pulse of Morning," as well as little-known gems such as Emma Lazarus's "The New Colossus," Robert Riskin's "Meet John Doe," and George Smith Patton's speech to the 3rd Army, 6th Armored Division. Not only is Spirit of America a great tool for drama students, it also brings history to life through its extraordinary speeches.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Stephen Peithman
"While most monologue collections cover a wider range of subjects, the focus is narrowed down in Spirit of America: Patriotic Monologues and Speeches for Middle and High School Students - although not all of the pieces are American, and not all of them are flag-wavers. Edited by D. Tulla Lightfoot, some examples include Martin Luther King’s "I Have a Dream" speech, excerpts from Plato’s The Republic and Geronimo’s Story of His Life, Susan B. Anthony’s speech on women’s right to vote, Emma Lazarus’s "The New Colossus" ("Give me your tired, your poor.."), General Patton’s speech to the 3rd Army, 6th Armored Division ("No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country") and Maya Angelou’s poem, "On the Pulse of Morning." This is a remarkable collection, in every respect."
Stage Directions, November 2005
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781575253756
  • Publisher: Smith & Kraus, Inc.
  • Publication date: 6/28/2005
  • Pages: 222
  • Sales rank: 1,446,454
  • Product dimensions: 5.38 (w) x 8.48 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

Monologues, Orations, and Editorials
1.  Plato: The Republic, 380-370 B.C.E.
2.  Maxwell Anderson: Joan of Lorraine, Act I, 1420s
3.  Maxwell Anderson: Joan of Lorraine, Act II, 1420s
4.  William Shakespeare: The Life of King Henry the Fifth, Act III, Scene I, 1420s
5.  William Shakespeare: The Life of King Henry the Fifth, Act IV,Scene 3,1420s
6.  Queen Elizabeth I: Speech to the Troops at Tilbury, 1588
7.  John Winthrop: A Model of Christian Charity, 1630
8.  Phillis Wheatley: Letter to Reverend Samson Occom, 1774
9.  Benjamin Franklin: The Rattle-Snake as a Symbol of America, 1775
10.  Patrick Henry: Speech, 1775
11.  John Dickinson: The Declaration on Taking Up Arms, 1775
12.  Samuel Adams: Speech Delivered at the Philadelphia Pennsylvania Statehouse, 1776
13.  John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776
14.  The Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776
15.  Sidney Kingsley: The Patriots, Act I, 1776
16.  Captain William Hull of the Continental Army: Record Concerning the Execution of Nathan Hale, 1776
17.  John Paul Jones: Extracts from the Journal of My Campaigns, 1785
16.  Thomas Paine: The American Crisis, 1776
19.  William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, Address to the House of Lords, 1777
20.  Abigail Adams, Letter to John Quincy Adams, 1780
21.  George Washington: First Inaugural Address, 1789
22.  George Washington: Farewell Address, 1796
23.  Thomas Jefferson: First Inaugural Address, 1801
24.  Deborah Samson: An Address, Delivered with Applause, 1802
25.  Daniel Webster: Plymouth Oration, 1820
26.  Robert E. Sherwood: Abe Lincoln in Illinois, Part 1
27.  Daniel Webster: Speech Commemorating the Bunker Hill Monument, 1825
28.  James Monroe: The Monroe Doctrine, 1823
29.  Colonel Davy Crockett: Colonel Davy Crockett Delivering His Celebrated Speech to Congress on the State of Finances, State Officers, and State Affaires in General, 1830s
30.  Robert E. Sherwood: Abe Lincoln in Illinois, part 2
31.  Andrew Jackson: Farewell Address, 1837
32.  Louis O. Coxe and Robert Chapman: Billy Budd, mid-1800s
33.  Ralph Waldo Emerson: The Young American, 1844
34.  Frederick Douglass: If I Had a Country, 1847
35.  Daniel Webster: An Address Delivered on Bunker Hill, 1848
36.  Sarah Josepha Hale: Our Thanksgiving Union, 1859
37.  Henry Ward Beecher: The American Flag, 1861
38.  Robert E. Sherwood: Abe Lincoln in Illinois part 3
39.  John Patrick: The Story of Mary Surratt - A Drama in Three Acts
40.  Mark Twain: Pilgrim Life, 1866
41.  Mark Twain: Introducing General Hawley, 1879
42.  Mark Twain: Welcome to General Grant, 1880
43.  Isabella Beecher Hooker: The Constitutional Rights of the Women of the United States: An Address Before the International Council of Women, 1888
44.  Annie Oakley: Letter to the President of the United States, 1898
45.  Albert Beveridge: The March of the Flag, 1898
46.  William Jennings Bryan: Behold a Republic, 1900
47.  Geronimo: Geronimo's Story of His Life, 1905
48.  Emmet Lavery: The Magnificent Yankee
49.  Carrie Chapman Catt: Speech Before Congress, 1917
50.  Woodrow Wilson: War Message, 1917
51.  Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr.: Speech Against the League of Nations, 1919
52.  General John Joseph Pershing: Dispatch of September, 1, 1919
53.  Senator Robert LaFollette: The Perils of 'Passive Citizenship,' 1924
54.  Will Rogers: Letters of a Self-Made Diplomat to His President, 1926
55.  Paul Green and Richard Wright: Native Son, 1941
56.  Winston Churchill: Speech to the House of Commons, 1940
57.  Franklin D. Roosevelt: Third Inaugural Address, 1941
58.  Franklin D. Roosevelt: The Four Freedoms, 1941
59.  George Smith Patton: Speech to 3rd Army, 6th Armored Division, 1944
60.  Harry S. Truman: Inaugural Address, 1949
61.  Adlai Stevenson: Nature of Patriotism, 1952
62.  Joseph McCarthy: "See It Now" - Senator McCarthy's Reply, 1954
63.  Dwight D. Eisenhower: Second Inaugural Address, 1957
64.  John F. Kennedy: Inaugural Address, 1961
65.  General Douglas MacArthur: Duty-Honor-Country, part 1, 1962
66.  General Douglas MacArthur: Duty-Honor-Country, part 2, 1962
67.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: I Have a Dream, part 1, 1963
68.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: I Have a Dream, part 2, 1963
69.  Richard M. Nixon: Resignation Speech, 1974
70.  Ronald Reagan: The Shining City Upon a Hill, 1974
71.  Ronald Reagan: Speech at Omaha Beach, 1984
72.  William Jefferson Clinton: Annual Flag Day Proclamation, 1996
73.  George W. Bush: Address to the Nation Following 9/11 Attack, 2001

Poems, Oaths, and Songs
74.  John Dickinson: The Liberty Song, 1768
75.  Phillis Wheatley: To the Right Honorable William, 1770
76.  Walter Scott: The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Canto 6, verses 1 and 2, 1805
77.  Francis Scott Key: The Star-Spangled Banner, 1812
78.  Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.: Old Ironsides, 1830
79.  Samuel Francis Smith: America, 1831
80.  H. A. Freeman: America Forever, 1898
81.  Julia Ward Howe: Battle Hymn of the Republic, 1862
82.  Horatio Alger, Jr.: The Price of Victory, 1875
83.  Clara Barton: The Women Who Went to the Field, 1892
84.  Katherine Lee Bates: America the Beautiful, 1895
85.  James Weldon Johnson: Lift Every Voice and Sing, 1899
86.  Walt Whitman: One Song America, Before I Go, 1900
87.  Emma Lazarus: The New Colossus, 1903
88.  George M. Cohan: You're a Grand Old Flag, 1906
89.  Rollin C. Ward: Thank God I Am an American, 1917
90.  Don Raye: This Is My Country, 1940
91.  Maya Angelou: On the Pulse of Morning, 1993
92.  What is a Marine?
93.  Code of Conduct of the United States Armed Forces
94.  The Oath of Military Enlistment

A Guide to the Monologues
Permission Acknowledgments
Read More Show Less

Introduction

When we were first approached about editing a book of patriotic monologues we immediately went out and read all the plays that we could find, and let me tell you, we found hundreds of them. Some of them were very old and musty library books; the pages were so ancient that they cracked when we touched them with our hands. After so much reading we became disappointed. Unfortunately it seems that we found very little theater written about people's love for their country. And what we did found was written for and about men. There just haven't been enough patriotic speeches written for women - a thing that I hope some of you readers will work on changing in future times.What a shame! We didn't know what to do. Then we remembered that in America's past, there were no such things as television and even radio. In the 1800s a lot of great monologues were given by orators, people who traveled from town to town giving speeches to paying audiences. In the 1600s and 1700s our country was so new that it was even difficult to reach a lecture hall sometimes, so ideas and opinions were written as published letters, essays, or poems. This was how people discussed and formed their ideas. So we became excited again. We read other books, and looked on the internet, becoming more and more involved with AMERICAN HISTORY!

What we discovered, and what we hope you discover as you read and perform these monologues, is that history is not the dull, boring, memorize-the-dates-and-battles subject that we thought it was. History can be interesting and even fun sometimes. History was created by exciting people, like you and me. These people had strong beliefs; some of them did wonderful things, while some of them made terrible mistakes. Some of them were presented with important or scary opportunities to influence the events and people of their times. We hope that the words we chose from these patriots connect to you somehow. As you recite their words, or perform their words, we, the editors of Spirit of America, hope that you discover these patriots, become interested in them, and continue to learn more about them on your own.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)