The Spiritual Universe: How Quantum Physics Proves the Existence of the Soul

The Spiritual Universe: How Quantum Physics Proves the Existence of the Soul

by Fred Alan Wolf
     
 

The American Book Award-winning author of Taking the Quantum Leap examines the startling answers modern science provides for questions about the soul--in a provocative exploration of the realm where religion, philosophy, science and spirituality intersect. Line drawings throughout.  See more details below

Overview

The American Book Award-winning author of Taking the Quantum Leap examines the startling answers modern science provides for questions about the soul--in a provocative exploration of the realm where religion, philosophy, science and spirituality intersect. Line drawings throughout.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Wolf (Quantum Leap, LJ 11/15/81; Parallel Universes, S. & S., 1990) provides an interesting investigation of the soulwhat it is, how it differs from the self, and what role it plays in good and evil. Wolf provides further insights into the "both/and" world of quantum physics as well as the spiritual and scientific basis for the soul. The 14 chapters engage the reader in soul physics, magnetic, emotional, feminine, and world soul and in soul searching (how does the soul remember?; is there an ancient basis for a modern soul?; and the heartfelt relationship of one soul to another). Public libraries would do well to add this to their collections since the discussion invites scientists, believers, and skeptics to a captivating exploration. Both the mainstream religious believer and the New Age participant will find something here to challenge them. The numerous notes and six-page bibliography make this a comprehensive examination inviting further probing.Leroy Hommerding, Citrus Cty. Lib. System, Beverly Hills, Fla.
Kirkus Reviews
An attempt to prove by scientific methods that the soul exists, by a physicist who has explored this terrain before, in The Eagle's Quest (1991) and The Dreaming Universe (1994).

Wolf certainly succeeds in pointing up the limitations of the old Newtonian science. Logical, objective, materialist science gave us industrialization, and one of industrialization's undeniable results is a polluted world in which the majority of inhabitants live in poverty. Thus science in its objectivity, the author asserts, fails to provide any usable moral compass. But Wolf indicts science for an even more profound and damaging failing: its contribution to our sense of "spiritual isolation, to a feeling of depression," and to the conviction that life is pointless. He wants somehow to quantify those manifestations that are universally felt but cannot be seen: the diminishment one feels after the death of a loved one; sudden insights that lead to greater knowledge; dreams that transform consciousness as surely as cold logic. Such conditions are real and have real effects, he argues, even if they are subjective. The old science describes static conditions and cannot deal with the fluid nature of reality except to deny its existence. Quantum physics, however, allows us to begin to grapple with fluid reality, because it recognizes that the observed object changes even as it is observed. Does such a recognition suggest the realm of the soul, ebbing in some unmeasurable, timeless constant? The argument is essentially this: We cannot see the soul, but we can fleetingly observe its effects on consciousness. Therefore, it's real. Wolf's language is, thankfully, quite clear, his presentation of ideas deft, including an entertaining tour of theories of the soul from Plato to Einstein. In the end, however, he sounds less like a scientist than a Buddhist—or, to be precise, he tries to use Buddhism to explain what science has been unable to describe.

Trendy, but earnest and appealing as well.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780684812007
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
08/06/1996
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
6.46(w) x 9.59(h) x 1.19(d)

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