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The Star
     

The Star

by Ute Blaich, Julie Litty (Illustrator)
 

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Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering. Used & new from $7.41 Have one to sell? Don't have one? We'll set one up for you. The Star by Ute Blaich, Julie Litty (Illustrator), Sibylle Kazeroid (Translator), Julie Wintz-Litty (Illustrator) see larger photo List Price: $15.95 Price: $11.17 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. See

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Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering. Used & new from $7.41 Have one to sell? Don't have one? We'll set one up for you. The Star by Ute Blaich, Julie Litty (Illustrator), Sibylle Kazeroid (Translator), Julie Wintz-Litty (Illustrator) see larger photo List Price: $15.95 Price: $11.17 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. See details. You Save: $4.78 (30%) Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours Used & new from $7.41 Reading level: Ages 4-8 Edition: Hardcover See more product details Editorial Reviews From School Library Journal Gr 1-3-On a bitterly cold Christmas Eve, Owl tries to explain the concept of Christmas to his hungry companions Raven, White Grouse, Sheep, and Mouse. They are confused and skeptical, especially when Owl tries to convince them that there are good human beings. He tells them about Christmas, which he calls "the Feast of Peace and Love." Sheep points out that humans eat meat during this celebration, and Owl has to agree. "People," he says, "have their own definition of peace and love." The others still aren't convinced, until a man and a child come out of the forest and leave the animals food so that they, too, can celebrate. Litty's elegant pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations effectively portray the stark, chilly landscape, and the animals all display distinctive personalities. The text is a tad stilted, yet there is humor, and the story does have an ultimately satisfying conclusion. Line justification changes from page to page, which makes the text a little difficult to read. Adults looking for a book to start a discussion about human nature and the true meaning of the season may find it worththe effort.-M. A. Copyright 2001 CahnersBusiness Information, Inc. Book Description It is a bitterly cold Christmas Eve, and in all the snowy landscape there is not a scrap of food to be had. The woodland creatures huddle together, cold and hungry, as Owl tells them the story of Christmas and its promise of peace and love among mankind. The other creatures are at first skeptical. In their experience humans are cruel predators to be feared and avoided. Then, to their surprise and delight, Owl's words prove true. A man and a boy come trudging through the snow, bringing food to the starving animals and the spirit of Christmas to all.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
"The night was bitterly cold." Even the black crow seems to shiver on the page as he perches on the snowy branch and the owl has definitely fluffed his feathers against the wind. Owl is annoyed that there is nothing to eat, "not even a mouse," until Sheep points out that Mouse is indeed right on the ground in front of him. But even Owl couldn't have Mouse for dinner on Christmas Eve. Owl proceeds to explain the events that are celebrated by people each Christmas There is a humorous exchange with Raven about Jesus being the son of man. "What is a person other than a son of man? Son of Wolf? Son of Elephant?" Owl patiently explains the goodness and love practiced by this particular son of man who is also believed to be the Son of God. "Once a year they celebrate this person," says Owl, to which Sheep retorts, "and for that they eat meat". There are ironies in the text that only adults may fully appreciate. The dialogue may be hard to grasp for some, but the realistic and detailed watercolors are friendly and inviting, and even the youngest reader or listener will appreciate the man and boy who bring bags of fruit and vegetables to the woods so the "animals can celebrate Christmas, too." 2001, North South Books, $15.95. Ages 5 to 9. Reviewer: Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-On a bitterly cold Christmas Eve, Owl tries to explain the concept of Christmas to his hungry companions Raven, White Grouse, Sheep, and Mouse. They are confused and skeptical, especially when Owl tries to convince them that there are good human beings. He tells them about Christmas, which he calls "the Feast of Peace and Love." Sheep points out that humans eat meat during this celebration, and Owl has to agree. "People," he says, "have their own definition of peace and love." The others still aren't convinced, until a man and a child come out of the forest and leave the animals food so that they, too, can celebrate. Litty's elegant pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations effectively portray the stark, chilly landscape, and the animals all display distinctive personalities. The text is a tad stilted, yet there is humor, and the story does have an ultimately satisfying conclusion. Line justification changes from page to page, which makes the text a little difficult to read. Adults looking for a book to start a discussion about human nature and the true meaning of the season may find it worth the effort.-M. A. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735815100
Publisher:
North-South Books, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2001
Edition description:
Library Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.51(w) x 11.56(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Blaich is a writer, journalist, and a critic who has worked in radio, television, and as an editor for a weekly newspaper.

Litty was born in France. She studied art and illustration in Lyon.

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