The State, Bureaucracy and the Cuban Schools: Power and Participation

Overview

In the mid-1980s Cuba began a process of rectificacion - a reform process that has bucked the trends of economic and political liberalization that are reshaping the global order. Sustaining an official commitment to socialism in the face of economic crisis and international pressures, Cuba's survival seems puzzling indeed. Sheryl Lutjens uses the Cuban experience as a context for investigating the problematic of democracy and democratic change. Identifying bureaucratic domination as a problem for democracy in all...
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Overview

In the mid-1980s Cuba began a process of rectificacion - a reform process that has bucked the trends of economic and political liberalization that are reshaping the global order. Sustaining an official commitment to socialism in the face of economic crisis and international pressures, Cuba's survival seems puzzling indeed. Sheryl Lutjens uses the Cuban experience as a context for investigating the problematic of democracy and democratic change. Identifying bureaucratic domination as a problem for democracy in all modern states, Lutjens turns to an examination of Cuban schools to explore questions of bureaucracy and participation. Exploring development and reform in the Cuban state, Lutjens looks at the effects of strong centralization in education policy, the central place of education in the economic and political goals of the revolution, and the extensive postrevolutionary experience with local participation in the educational system. She argues that the Cuban experience with schools and educational performance suggests that scholars can break through traditional categories and concepts if they take into account the participation of ordinary people.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Taking Cuban education reforms of the middle 1980s as a case study, Lutjens (political science, Northern Arizona U.) investigates the problematic relationship between bureaucracy and democratic change. She looks at the effects of strong centralization in education policy, the importance of education in the economic and political goals of the revolution, and the extensive experience with local participation in the post- revolutionary school system. She finds evidence that scholars can break through traditional categories and concepts by turning to the ordinary people. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

List of Tables
Acknowledgments
List of Acronyms
1 Bureaucratic Domination, Democratic Possibilities, and the Cuban Case 1
2 The Socialist State and the Politics of Efficiency 29
3 The Ministry of Education and Cuban Politics: Accountability and Poder Popular 69
4 Technical Experts and Ordinary People: Centralization and Decision Making 99
5 Community Participation in Cuban Schools: Power and Accountability 127
6 Rectification, Education, and Participation 157
7 Democratic Participation: Concluding with Cuba 191
About the Book and Author 225
Index 227
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