The State is Rolling Back Vol 2

Overview

The State Is Rolling Back, the second volume of Liberty Fund’s The Collected Works of Arthur Seldon, brings together a comprehensive collection of fifty-four articles reflecting Arthur Seldon’s scholarly development. By the late twentieth century, Arthur Seldon was one of the most powerful exponents of classical liberalism, helping to stimulate its revival, through both his own writings and the publications of the London-based Institute of Economic Affairs, of which he was ...

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Overview

The State Is Rolling Back, the second volume of Liberty Fund’s The Collected Works of Arthur Seldon, brings together a comprehensive collection of fifty-four articles reflecting Arthur Seldon’s scholarly development. By the late twentieth century, Arthur Seldon was one of the most powerful exponents of classical liberalism, helping to stimulate its revival, through both his own writings and the publications of the London-based Institute of Economic Affairs, of which he was Editorial Director for more than 30 years.

First published in 1994, this book collects virtually all of Seldon’s major ideas and his proposals for reform. In its totality, The State Is Rolling Back demonstrates Seldon’s long-standing advocacy and commitment to free-market reforms and includes his earliest, barbed criticisms of the “welfare state.”

The entire series includes:

Volume 1: The Virtues of Capitalism (September 2004)
Volume 2: The State Is Rolling Back (November 2004)
Volume 3: Everyman's Dictionary of Economics (January 2005)
Volume 4: Introducing Market Forces into "Public" Services (February 2005)
Volume 5: Government Failure and Over-Government (May 2005)
Volume 6: The Welfare State: Pensions, Health, and Education (October 2005)
Volume 7: The IEA, the LSE, and the Influence of Ideas (December 2005)

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction
Preface
Foreword
Foreword
Foreword
1 The state v. the market : socialism v. capitalism [1937] 3
2 Liberalism and liberty : the diffusion of property [1938] 10
3 The new world order - H. G. Wells' myth [1940] 17
4 The contribution of economics to policy [1955] 21
5 Citizenship - the Cul-de-sac [1958] 28
6 The perpetual welfare state [1968] 33
7 Conservatism and liberalism [1968] 38
8 Individual liberty and representative democracy [1979] 46
9 La Trahison des Clercs [1980] 49
10 The brewers' dilemma [1950] 63
11 Reform the licensing laws [1957] 69
12 Best friends of shoppers : which? : or competition? [1963] 73
13 Markets in welfare to strengthen the economy [1966] 77
14 Wind up national insurance [1971] 81
15 Inflation is crueller than unemployment [1972] 84
16 Police : compete or retreat [1977] 88
17 The truth about unemployment [1982] 94
18 Underground resistance to over-government [1986] 98
19 A private welfare state? [1957] 103
20 Why state pensions? [1958] 106
21 Contract in or out? [1960] 110
22 Pensions and property [1960] 114
23 Social services in the late twentieth century [1961] 119
24 Social services for the future, not the past [1962] 127
25 Universities out of politics [1962] 131
26 Beveridge came too late [1963] 136
27 Homes : clear the obstacles [1963] 148
28 Wanted - home entrepreneurs [1964] 153
29 Shop with welfare vouchers [1965] 163
30 A free market - or political mortgages [1965] 167
31 Privatise welfare : a new strategy [1965] 173
32 Politics looms too large [1966] 177
33 Tax state benefits [1966] 181
34 Make social services selective [1967] 186
35 Workers reject state welfare [1969] 191
36 Roll back the state [1969] 196
37 The great pensions swindle [1970] 203
38 Top up the poor man's pay [1971] 207
39 Tory advance : reluctant officials [1971] 211
40 Timid tories and state welfare [1972] 215
41 The state is usurping parents [1978] 222
42 Move universities to the market [1980] 227
43 Political bar to economic progress [1988] 233
44 Whose obedient servant? [1969] 245
45 Can bureaucrats be neutral? [1972] 248
46 Phase out the civil servants [1979] 252
47 Government of the busy, by the bossy, for the bully [1980] 256
48 Price-less opinion polling [1980] 260
49 "New right" and new government [1983] 264
50 New left : beware politics [1988] 268
51 Capitalism is more corrigible than socialism [1986] 272
52 Policies : the difficult and the "impossible" [1988] 276
53 Too little government is better than too much [1990] 287
54 Laissez-faire in the twenty-first century [1992] 290
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