The Stations of Still Creek

The Stations of Still Creek

by Barbara J. Scot
     
 

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The Stations of Still Creek is the tale of a woman's personal journey and the healing inspiration she finds in the natural settings surrounding her. In a quest for personal and creative truth, Barbara Scot moves to her country cabin at Still Creek, in a National Forest preserve in the shadow of Mount Hood, to be still and thoughtful, in spite of the turmoil…  See more details below

Overview


The Stations of Still Creek is the tale of a woman's personal journey and the healing inspiration she finds in the natural settings surrounding her. In a quest for personal and creative truth, Barbara Scot moves to her country cabin at Still Creek, in a National Forest preserve in the shadow of Mount Hood, to be still and thoughtful, in spite of the turmoil of a strained marriage.
Scot takes us on a spiritual journey incorporating seven inspiring natural formations - the Stations of Still Creek: The Old Growth Sculpture; The Burned-Out Cedar Snag; The Towering Maples; The Red Roots Station; The Four Alders with Perfect Posture; Maiden-Hair Fern Point; and The Green Cathedral.
Observing the stations over time, Scot experiences a rebirth--a letting go of past disappointments. Her deep communion with nature and attachment to the Stations are at the heart of her journey. Beautifully written and rich with natural detail, The Stations of Still Creek examines issues that many women (and men) are facing today: the compromises in a marriage, the breakdown of one's own body; the death of friends; and the choices everyone must make in a lifetime.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A naturalist and author (Prairie Reunion), Scot, driven at the age of 54 to examine her inner self, spent nearly a year in the cabin she and her husband, Jim, owned at Still Creek, within the stunning beauty of the forest preserve on Oregon's Mount Hood, an hour away from their home in Portland. Choosing the Roman Catholic Stations of the Cross as an analogy, Scot found seven natural formations within walking distance of the cabin, where she went to meditate about her life. Interspersed with her personal ruminations are vivid descriptions of the changing seasons: of the salmon that spawned in the creek during the fall and of the winter snowstorms that decorated her stations with dazzling ice and frost. The major issues Scot confronted during this period were the state of her marriage and the certainty of death. Although she and her husband were united by their love for reach other and for the natural world, as well as by the deep pleasure they both took in mountain climbing, Scot refers to their relationship as "containing an unspoken agreement to avoid anything in conversation that matters" to their lives. Although Jim wanted to stop working to devote more time to mountain climbing, he kept his job in Portland and paid the bills while Scot retired from her teaching job and lived in the cabin. After their year apart, however, they went to Bolivia and hiked to the top of Cerro Charkini, a harrowing climb that, for the author of this richly expressive account, reaffirmed their relationship. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781578050642
Publisher:
Sierra Club Books
Publication date:
02/20/2001
Pages:
204
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

This is a story of mountains and marriage, of small rivers and stillness in the forest. It is also the partial portrayal of what the eminent psychoanalyst Karen Horney, writing in 1942, the year I was born, called self-realization. In the early seventies after a failed marriage and an abortive attempt at suicide, I came by a copy of her collected writings that quite literally saved my life. Her work Self Analysis helped me achieve an equilibrium that afforded two decades of relatively stable existence before the dam broke from a resurgence of creative longing that forced me, like so many others in middle age, to resume an unfinished quest.
The most difficult hurdle in the full release of our unique potential, according to Dr. Horney, is to acknowledge that "to search for truth about self is as valuable as to search for truth in other areas of life." Busy as mother, teacher, and wife, I did not fully honor that important fact for a long time, in spite of inner restlessness. But I taught in America public schools, dealing with the odd mixture of myth and reality in our national heritage that produces such an intense responsibility to be all we can be. Teacher, I thought somewhat wearily when I finally left the profession, remembering imperfectly some biblical injunction from my youth, teach thyself
.
Karen Horney believed that within us constructive forces work to release our creative self, and the less obstructed those forces are, the more we will realize our full potentialities, enhance our relationships with others, and understand our possible contribution to the larger picture. Such growth, she suggested, can occur outside the clinicalsetting as well as within; in fact, finding one's own mountain path gives an individual a feeling of greater strength than taking one that is shown. Life itself is our ultimate therapist, with its hardships and its gifts.
Thus follows this account of the stations and my circuitous route to their stillness, which I offer to fellow travelers. Yours may be a more adventurous, heroic journey than my quiet foray into the forest, but our stories surely share the universals: love, death, a compelling human need to fit our small chip of light into the eternally tumbling mosaic of color.

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Meet the Author

Barbara J. Scot is an avid climber, hiker, and naturalist. She is the author of two critically acclaimed books, The Violet Shyness of Their Eyes (PNBA Award Winner, 1994) and Prairie Reunion (a New York Times Notable Book, 1995).

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