The Stone Fey

The Stone Fey

by Robin McKinley, John Clapp
     
 


Maddy has been roaming the hills of Damar with her sheep since she was a girl. The Hills hold everything she desires: her family; her beloved dog, Aerlich - and soon, her fiancé, Donal, who has been away for a year. But one evening a lamb is lost. And when Maddy returns to the Hills to find it, she discovers something else the Hills possess - something… See more details below

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Overview


Maddy has been roaming the hills of Damar with her sheep since she was a girl. The Hills hold everything she desires: her family; her beloved dog, Aerlich - and soon, her fiancé, Donal, who has been away for a year. But one evening a lamb is lost. And when Maddy returns to the Hills to find it, she discovers something else the Hills possess - something that will change her forever...

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Newberry Medalist Robin McKinley returns to Damar with a passionate and unsettling love story.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
While staying true to her penchant for presenting strong female protagonists, Newbery winner McKinley strikes a softer note with this deeply romantic yet ultimately clear-eyed love story set in the fantasy kingdom of Damar. Maddy has always known who she is and exactly what she wants--to tend her flock of sheep; to marry her childhood friend, Donal; and to earn enough money to build her own farm close beside the "Hills [that] were her flesh and bone." But after she meets and falls in love with a Stone Fey, Maddy finds herself drifting further and further away from the people and things she truly cares for. Only when she accepts the fact that the Fey is unable to return her love (or to feel anything at all) is she free to rediscover her sense of self. Newcomer Clapp's incidental illustrations, dreamy watercolor and graphite paintings reminiscent of the work of Barry Moser, heighten the quiet drama of McKinley's prose. The best of his landscapes evoke the serene stillness of McKinley's writing; one portrait of Maddy, with its masterful play of light and shadow, particularly showcases his craft, as it glows with the power of burgeoning love. McKinley's sophisticated syntax, as well as the text's subtle concern with female sexuality, make the novella most appropriate for teens who can appreciate its empowering feminist message. The superb storytelling, however, will likely hold the rapt attention of readers whatever their politics or gender. Ages 10-up. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Linda Uhlenkott
"I refuse to have anything to do with anything that doesn't have roots and isn't green." This line, nearly the last in The Stone Fey, is the key to the mystery, the haunting character of the stone fey. Although ostensibly about a forbidden sort of love, it is also a narrative examination of the sufferings of Maddy, who wants something different than the farm that her mother inherited from her grandmother, and that she, Maddy, will inherit from her mother. As strong-willed as her mother, Maddy insists on retaining some of the money that she earns from her sheep, saving it in an old boot against the day that Donal, her fiancT, will return home from his year of working as a logger. He and Maddy plan to buy their own farm. Maddy's enchantment by a stone fey strains her ties to Donal, her family, even her sheepdog, before she returns (literally) to her senses. John Clapp's illustrations of the landscape of Maddy's Hills evoke the mystery of the British Isles; they induce in the reader a willing belief in the existence of stone feys and other magical creatures. Although Maddy and Donal obviously consummate their relationship before their marriage, Robin McKinley, a Newbery Medalist, deals with this in a subtle and tasteful manner that makes this book appropriate for middle grade children and up. 1998 (orig.
Charles De Lint
The many watercolors by John Clapp are lovely - a couple are even inspired - while McKinley's prose reads like an adult short story, rather than a children's book. Though perhaps that's simply the mark of a good writer: one who doesn't write down to her audience.
Fantasy & Science Fiction

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152000172
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/01/1998
Edition description:
Illustrated Edition
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.43(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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