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The Stone of David

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Overview

The descendants of Abraham, Jews, Muslims and Christians have been locked in battle for millennia, marring the earth and the face of humanity with one destructive skirmish and war after another. However, the conflicts that make the news are merely eruptions of evidence from a deeper and more sinister war that has raged uninterrupted and mostly underground since the beginning of time. Radical, super-secretive and sometimes seemingly supernatural groups of those bent on global domination have manipulated the ...
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The Stone of David

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Overview

The descendants of Abraham, Jews, Muslims and Christians have been locked in battle for millennia, marring the earth and the face of humanity with one destructive skirmish and war after another. However, the conflicts that make the news are merely eruptions of evidence from a deeper and more sinister war that has raged uninterrupted and mostly underground since the beginning of time. Radical, super-secretive and sometimes seemingly supernatural groups of those bent on global domination have manipulated the world's population to the brink of annihilation on more than one occasion. If not for the counterbalance of an equally secretive and powerful force of peace known simply as "The 12" they may well have succeeded by now.
At the heart of some of the the world's oldest secrets "The Stone of David" holds the key to a body of knowledge with the power to unravel the tidy facade of global stability and provide ultimate power to the possessor. An unusual alliance of old enemies has carved a new facet into this landscape of power struggles and forces Laura Wells, a former CIA agent and her husband Alexander, one of "The 12" out of seclusion and into full conflict with those bent on igniting the tenth Crusade and WWIII.
Through new alliances, uncovered secrets between them, and the use of an array of stunning technology, Laura and Alexander take the fight to the heart of this global meltdown and to the most furiously contested patch of earth that is Jerusalem.
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Editorial Reviews

Author - Ann Markham Walsh
Matthew Doss has created an amazingly original and perfectly executed work in his soon to be published first book, The Stone of David.
Geographically, we move from the mountains of North Carolina and an illusion of safety to Honduras, Rome, and the Middle East in a maelstrom of violence and danger. Emotionally, we ride a wild roller coaster of suspense, intrigue, and romance, with each development made real by precision of language and believability of character.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780989760911
  • Publisher: Matt Doss
  • Publication date: 10/16/2013
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2014

    Both 1 Star reviews on here appear to be personal attacks rather

    Both 1 Star reviews on here appear to be personal attacks rather than genuine reviews. I've read the book twice, have attended a book club during which Mr. Doss was the guest author and have discussed it several times with others. In short, it is one of the most brilliantly written and thought provoking books in this genre I've ever read. Trust me, I don't read just any book twice. As for a sequel, please hurry Mr. Doss, we cannot wait!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2014

    A fast read because of the rapid action and chapter to chapter m

    A fast read because of the rapid action and chapter to chapter mini-cliffhangers. Kept me engaged for the whole journey and gave me more to think about than most books in genre. Well done!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2014

    I was taken completely by surprise by this book. Where it begins

    I was taken completely by surprise by this book. Where it begins is nowhere close to where it ends and what happens in between is an absolute thrill ride. Doss seamlessly weaves a story of  intrigue, suspense and action that kept me turning the pages and in one instance made me late for a meeting. I love that the female characters are on equal footing with their male counterparts and in some cases superior footing. It's refreshing and encouraging to read an author who writes believable female action characters who are not damsels in distress. Hurry up and write more!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2014

    How do I begin to describe this piece of literary work? The bril

    How do I begin to describe this piece of literary work? The brilliance of this story is something to behold, to relish and to immerse yourself into every detail. The theological undertones within the story are fascinating to ponder. The truths within this are great reminders for our lives. The action keeps you on your toes and running to the next chapter. The characters, you discover, are people you know and are endearing. Read this now then go see it in theaters! It MUST become a screenplay! There is more to come from Matt Doss. I look forward with great anticipation to the next!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2013

    Great book! If you like Dan Brown, you will like Matt Doss! Full

    Great book! If you like Dan Brown, you will like Matt Doss! Full of intrigue, and interesting  characters.
    I would love to more know about Laura and Alexander's relationship, I hope the author will continue exploring their relationship!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    Great read

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Stone of David by Matt Doss. The intrigue, the tension of the religious aspects, and the characters kept me turning page after page. I am looking forward to a second book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 13, 2013

    One Heck of a Read!

    Imagine what storytelling happens when you combine the talents of Dan Brown and Tom Clancey? Hard to, huh. Well The Stone of David, expertly written by Matt Doss, accomplishes just that. From the first page until the last, what a read. I absoluted loved the characters and the flesh that he put on their bones, their mission and interaction. And only really protagonist...mean guy! If you are like me, find an afternoon, evening where your decks are cleared and dive in to this incredible first novel by Doss. It is one heck of a read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 6, 2013

    To build suspense The Stone of David almost immediately delivers

    To build suspense The Stone of David almost immediately delivers its heroes and villains but leaves their true allies and adversaries
    in question.  In a plot that moves fluidly and rarely projects enough to permit the reader to arrive ahead of the story's twists and turns,
    the book kept me turning pages.  The feeling was always with me that in just a paragraph or two I'd learn another piece of the mysteries
    driving the tale and thus go a bit deeper down the rabbit hole.  The author's approach to creating imagery and action was a nearly
    seamless one.  The places and the character interactions were woven together masterfully.  The question that stayed with me
    throughout the book was if this engaging and imaginative work is the author's first novel what should I expect from the second?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 22, 2013

    With "The Stone Of David", Matt Doss has tossed his ha

    With "The Stone Of David", Matt Doss has tossed his hat into a decidedly rough-and-tumble ring where many would-be fiction writers have dared to venture but few have been able to claim as their own: the international thriller. The giants of this genre loom over each new novel that tries to break into its hallowed halls. "The Stone Of David" shares many of the hallmarks of the best international thrillers. The intrigue starts almost immediately, indeed within the first few pages as a mysterious figure reappears into the now-tranquil life of Alexander Kilpatrick, a former Episcopalian priest who carries some mysteries of his own. His girlfriend, Laura Wells, is alarmed by Alexander's reaction to this mysterious man, Walter Trowbridge, who knows much more about him than even she does. Walter's reappearance, and subsequent death, set into motion a chain of events that will have the world teetering on the brink of destruction while most of its inhabitants go about their daily business, completely unaware.
    But, like all good fiction, "The Stone Of David" attempts to transcend classification. And, it does this very well in most areas. The novel's opening is ruminative and bucolic, and it is presented in an almost fairy-tale-love-story manner, which, when juxtaposed against Walter's character, gives the reader a firm anchor to hold onto when the action starts. Because the book then progresses into science fiction, alternative histories, Biblical archaeology, and religious philosophy and mysticism, not to mention the requisite intrigues and conspiracies that propel the book to a satisfying yet open-ended conclusion. Doss' voice rings clear throughout the novel. His writing is assured and fluid, for the most part. He knows his characters very well and he lets in just enough information to keep the story churning without bogging down. The book's pacing is brisk and insistent; you want to know what happens with each turn of a page. The imagery he uses makes each scene come alive, especially when he switches venues to Honduras and Israel. You know from the care he takes in describing those places that he knows them and that they have left their imprint in his psyche.
    As a personal preference, I wanted to know more about Laura and Alexander's relationship and backstories. "The Stone Of David" works as an exploration of ideas rather than ideologies -- the idea that love and beauty exist in even the most brutal and forbidding of environments, the idea of life as a struggle between good and evil when both will do whatever it takes to persevere, the idea that some falsehoods serve humanity better than some truths, and more -- and, as the novel's touchstones, Laura and Alexander's relationship is unflappable. And being such, I felt more insight into how their connection started and solidified would elevate the book's themes even more. I also wanted more backstory on the struggles between the forces of good and evil (I won't name names, since doing so would reveal too much about the plot, but suffice it to say, it's a very well-thought-out plot). But, the job of a good book is to leave you wanting more, and "The Stone Of David" does just that. And, I have a feeling that, somewhere within Matt Doss' mind or probably even in his notes or notebooks, is the makings of a sequel. And it will be one that I will look forward to with much anticipation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2014

    Unbelievably bad.  What holds anyone's interest in this drivel i

    Unbelievably bad.  What holds anyone's interest in this drivel is a mystery to me.  The characters are so overblown that this reads like a superhero comic book.  And the worst of it is .... Doss is writing a sequel!  Spare us all and get a job.  

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2013

    The information might be accurate although there is no proof of

    The information might be accurate although there is no proof of that. The writing is elementary, at best, and pathetic. The author tries to tell the story using "big words" but there is no meat to the story. It's a strange mix of poorly written romance novel and attempted Tom Clancy espionage. He misses on both attempts. I would not recommend reading this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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