The Stories of Devil Girl

The Stories of Devil Girl

4.5 6
by Anya Achtenberg
     
 

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Devil-Girl is a storyteller smaller than a stain and larger than life, a mythic figure roaming the globe. Born into Brooklyn housing projects and the nightmares of her immigrant family, she becomes a runaway in the human marketplace of the streets of New York. Accompanied by her sense of outrage and sense of humor, ghosts of the ancestors and her prophetic vision, she

Overview

Devil-Girl is a storyteller smaller than a stain and larger than life, a mythic figure roaming the globe. Born into Brooklyn housing projects and the nightmares of her immigrant family, she becomes a runaway in the human marketplace of the streets of New York. Accompanied by her sense of outrage and sense of humor, ghosts of the ancestors and her prophetic vision, she moves from silence through rage into deep alliance with the marginalized.

"Poignant and fierce, this book is moving, beautifully written, and urgently relevant."

"Devil-Girl's stories are all of our stories, all of the 'discarded and demonized', all of us who have had to fight to survive, to fight to tell our truths. Achtenberg's wise survivor, Devil-Girl, is witness and seer, and her words are sustenance. There is much pain in this book, much wisdom, and a kind of beauty that sears itself into memory, a fierce beauty that is as necessary as air. Read this book."
-Lisa D. Chave, Author of Destruction Bay; In An Angry Season

"Achtenberg is a cutting-edge voice in the literature of the postglobalization age, an era in which we are uprooted geographically and spiritually, and redefining what it means to be home. What a superbly written book! Read it and be changed."
-Demetria Martinez, Author of Mother Tongue

"Stunning and original! Powerful 'make it new' language that creates-through the runaway energy and precise detail of the storytelling voice-a disturbing world in all its particularities, only to transcend it by grappling with what's at stake in the larger world."
-Stratis Haviaras, Founder and former editor of Harvard Review

"An amazing piece of bravura writing! Devil-Girl takes us from destitution to seedy glamour as a homeless vulnerable young woman tries to survive the savagery of the streets. Poignant and fierce, this book is moving, beautifully written, and urgently relevant."
-Kathleen Spivack, Author, Director: Advanced Writing Workshop

Book #1 in the Reflections of America Series
Learn about the author at www.AnyaAchtenberg.com
Modern History Press www.ModernHistoryPress.com
an imprint of Loving Healing Press

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011834356
Publisher:
Modern History Press
Publication date:
09/28/2010
Series:
Reflections of America , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
128
File size:
864 KB

Meet the Author

Anya Achtenberg is an award‐winning fiction writer and poet. Her recently completed novel, More Than The Wind, was excerpted in Harvard Review. Her second book of poetry, The Stone of Language, was published in 2004 by West End Press. Her stories have received awards from Coppola’s Zoetrope: All‐Story, New Letters, the Asheville Fiction Writers Workshop, the Raymond Carver Story Contest and others. She received a 2008 Minnesota State Arts Board Grant for work on History Artist, a novel‐in‐progress, centering on Devi Mau, a Cambodian woman born of an African‐American father at the moment the bombing of Cambodia began. She is working on a book to turn her multi-genre course, Writing for Social Change: Re-Dream a Just World, into a moveable workshop. She has taught creative writing at universities and colleges, for writers’ organizations, with drop-out youth, working adults, and in the public schools. She teaches independent workshops throughout the country and online, on essential elements of story in fiction and memoir; deepening characterization; autobiography and autobiographical fiction; and writing for social change. She offers manuscript consultations in fiction, poetry, and memoir. Visit her website Writing Story / Finding Poetry / Freeing Voice: Swimming through the ocean of language at www.AnyaAchtenberg.com

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The Stories Of Devil-Girl 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
queenpanda1982 More than 1 year ago
The stories of the Devil-girl (reflection of America Series) By Anya Achenberg The stories of Devil Girl is a book that either you love to read or not. It is a unique read unlike any other i have read before. Devil girl undergoes many trials. She suffers, as she questions her life and finds self reliance. She is jewish, but she learns no one will pray for her. As she leaves the only home she ever known she finds that not everyone can be trusted. She gets an education and becomes a teacher. This book is recommended to every woman and man, to see just how bad this world can be. The devil girl character shows that you can always turn your life around and become better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The stories of the Devil-girl (reflection of America Series) By Anya Achenberg The stories of Devil Girl is a book that either you love to read or not. It is a unique read unlike any other i have read before. Devil girl undergoes many trials. She suffers, as she questions her life and finds self reliance. She is jewish, but she learns no one will pray for her. As she leaves the only home she ever known she finds that not everyone can be trusted. She gets an education and becomes a teacher. This book is recommended to every woman and man, to see just how bad this world can be. The devil girl character shows that you can always turn your life around and become better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
lindaroseLR More than 1 year ago
"The Stories of Devil~Girl (Reflections of America Series)" By Anya Achenberg us one of those books that you're either going to love or hate. I have read over six-hundred books from August to now and this is the ONLY book that I have hated. It is uniquly boring- it bores you to tears, but you want to keep going to see if the book gets better (it doesn't, just so you know.) I read it twice just so that i could try to see if it was better as you try it again. Anya Achtenberg is a great writer- but i didn't like the story line. Then again, maby i am just being biased because I am more accustomed to Teen Fiction.
Tyler_TichelaarTT More than 1 year ago
Reading Anya Achtenberg's novella "The Stories of Devil-Girl" is a unique experience. Describing "The Stories of Devil-Girl" is difficult. Readers really need to experience the language for themselves. To give a taste of the style, here is a passage from the novel's opening when Devil-Girl describes the circumstances of her birth in New York: I was born here as the one I had violated during another lifetime, I'm sure of it. I was born here to walk the avenue between life and death. To fill out the forms of denial. To rave in the road and stop traffic with my stillness, as some do with their anger. To prowl the bootless alleyways, to drink the spoiled fluids of men. To flail beneath the Devil. To sprout breasts in the lunar lots of Bushwick, where the maws of an old Frigidaire caught my friend Penelope and she froze to a fetus, knees to lips, gray fists clenched. Devil-Girl's first memory is of someone trying to strangle her-someone she later believes must be the mother who clearly does not want her. Her father is not much more friendly. When she leaves home and begins giving men what they want so she can survive, she compares herself to the monster in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" who was "unnatural, bereft of a determinable childhood." When Devil-Girl learns about Lilith, the woman in Jewish tradition depicted as Adam's first wife, driven from Eden as evil, she takes on a similar identity. Devil-Girl encounters perverts and sadists who relish the chance to use and abuse her. But despite her negative experiences, Devil-Girl has a hopeful spirit; she senses there is some good in her, and she becomes a kinder version of Lilith; while the mythical Lilith sought children to punish and kill, Devil-Girl will ultimately find others like her whom she can protect and nurture. Devil-Girl undergoes many trials. She suffers, she questions life, and she finds irony in the way her mother calls upon God and he answers by fulfilling her curses. Devil-Girl knows no one will pray for her, so she decides to learn how to pray herself, but ultimately, she learns self-reliance. She is Jewish-she knows those who have escaped the holocaust, seen the numbers tattooed on their arms. But a young man who wants to fight for Israel tells her, she has done nothing for their people-he calls her "Lilith" and "Whore of Babylon." Devil-Girl, however, comes to realize her people are not limited to Jews but to anyone who has suffered like her. In a few places, I felt the episodic writing did not always make the transitions in Devil-Girl's life clear, but at the same time, the poetic language would probably have suffered from too much detail. If I have a complaint, it's that the book is not longer; wishing a book to be longer is a good thing; I felt I would have liked to get to know Devil-Girl better. Achtenberg has stated that her book is partially autobiographical. Like Devil-Girl, Achtenberg is Jewish, from New York, and a teacher. But whatever else of the story is autobiographical is transcended by the creation of Devil-Girl as a fictional everywoman. Her character speaks to us, it makes us see the world anew, a world often ugly, but nevertheless, one where hope can lead to change. For more information, about Anya Achtenberg and her poetic, socially relevant writing, visit www.anyaachtenberg.com. - Tyler R. Tichelaar, Ph.D., author of the award-winning Narrow Lives