The Story of a Blue Bird

The Story of a Blue Bird

by Bogacki, Tomasz Bogacki, Tomek Bogacki, Tomasz Bogacki
     
 

Curiosity overcomes fear

A little blue bird is afraid to learn to fly, but is still very curious about the world beyond his nest. "Mama, mama, what is out there?" he asks. "Nothing," his mother replies. "Now go to sleep." But the little bird can't stop thinking about what his mother said. What is this nothing? Finally, curiosity draws the little bird from

…  See more details below

Overview

Curiosity overcomes fear

A little blue bird is afraid to learn to fly, but is still very curious about the world beyond his nest. "Mama, mama, what is out there?" he asks. "Nothing," his mother replies. "Now go to sleep." But the little bird can't stop thinking about what his mother said. What is this nothing? Finally, curiosity draws the little bird from his nest into the wonders of the great outside world - and he learns to fly. When he returns, his family asks him, "What happened?" "Nothing!" replies the little blue bird, happily. With his characteristcally expressive and richly textured illustrations, Tomek Bogacki - whose fables for the very young have been likened to those of Leo Lionni - shows how a little bird, in his search for nothing, finds everything.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A small bird is urged by its mother to take wing; the baby is afraid to fly, although it is curious about what is beyond the confines of its nest. 'Nothing,' chirps his mother. One night the blue bird leaves the nest, on foot, in search of 'nothing.'" —Kirkus Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In Bogacki's (Cat and Mouse) visually voluptuous but narratively disjointed tale, a downy baby blue bird is curious about the world beyond his nest, yet fearful of flying. His mother unwittingly hits on an inspiration for his flight: one night, in an attempt to coax her inquiring offspring to sleep, she tells him that there's "nothing" beyond the trees. His interest piqued, he leaves the nest in search of "nothing." When he comes upon a flock of birds and tells them what he's looking for, they take to the air, inspiring the baby bird to forget his fear of flying and join them: "And they flew high, and they flew low. They flew here, and they flew there." Unfortunately, Bogacki never resolves for readers what "nothing" meanshe hints that it may be the unseen air in which the birds soar, but no explicit connection is made; ultimately, this key word becomes something of a red herring. For some readers, it may be enough that the book is so sensually alluring, inviting readers to loll in its full-bleed spreads, replete with plush textures, serene blues and melon greens and chubby, wide-eyed birds who in flight resemble toy airplanes; for others, it may be difficult to overlook the lack of resolution in the text. Ages 3-5. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Carolyn Dennette Michaels
The blurb reads; "In this simple fable, Tomek Bogacki shows how a little bird, in his search for nothing, finds everything." The protagonist's wanting and looking for nothing, meeting companions of other colors, having courage to fly himself; and still finding "nothing" leads us to expect resolution to the story. When the blue bird returns to the nest, his sole response to the queries of his mother and siblings is "Nothing." Then his siblings say, "Tell us about it." Come with me, said the blue bird. "And they flew high and they flew low... All together." END! Of the story. For fifteen dollars one surely can find many a picture book with a more memorable or unified text.
School Library Journal
PreS-KA little blue bird is afraid to fly so he just sits in the nest and watches. When he asks his mother what is out there, she replies, "Nothing." He can't stop thinking about nothing and goes off in search of it. He meets other birds and learns to fly; when he returns home, he happily tells his family that nothing happened. The story is inane and the slight humor of looking for nothing will be lost on young children. The illustrations are more interesting than the text. Done in thick colors with what looks like oil crayons, they display a strong design and a creative color sense. The birds, reduced to simple, bold shapes, are made rich by the textured application of color, but interesting artwork is not enough to make this a necessary purchase.Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY
Kirkus Reviews
Bogacki (I Hate You! I Like You!, 1997, etc.) presents the tale of a blue bird who tries to be cleverly heroic, but winds up a coy cipher. A small bird is urged by its mother to take wing; the baby is afraid to fly, although it is curious about what is beyond the confines of its nest. "Nothing," chirps his mother. One night the blue bird leaves the nest, on foot, in search of "nothing." He meets a green bird, who asks, "What are you looking for?" "Nothing," says the blue bird. "Oh! Come with me," squeaks the green bird. Then a flock of colorful birds flies by; upon hearing of the blue bird's quest, they say, "Oh! Come with us." The blue bird forgets his fears and flies after the green bird into their midst. It may be best not to question the pursuit of "nothing" too closely; unlike Bogacki's previous books, which are deliberately didactic, this one is neat, tidy, and charminglybut utterlyelusive. The landscapes reveal the world as the bird sees it, before and after flight, and the characters are pudgily identifiable to preschoolers. (Picture book. 3-5)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374371975
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
04/10/1998
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.31(w) x 11.19(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
AD170L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >