The Story of Little Black Sambo. ILLUSTRATED

The Story of Little Black Sambo. ILLUSTRATED

3.2 7
by Helen Bannerman
     
 

The Story of Little Black Sambo, a children's book by Helen Bannerman, a Scot who lived for 30 years in Madras in southern India, was first published in London in 1899. (An American edition of the book was illustrated by Florence White Williams.) In the tale, an Indian boy named Sambo prevails over a group of hungry tigers. The little

Overview

The Story of Little Black Sambo, a children's book by Helen Bannerman, a Scot who lived for 30 years in Madras in southern India, was first published in London in 1899. (An American edition of the book was illustrated by Florence White Williams.) In the tale, an Indian boy named Sambo prevails over a group of hungry tigers. The little boy has to give his colourful new clothes, shoes, and umbrella to four tigers so they will not eat him. Sambo recovers the clothes when the jealous, conceited tigers chase each other around a tree until they are reduced to a pool of delicious melted butter. The story was a children's favourite for half a century, but then became controversial due to the use of the word sambo, a racial slur in some countries.

� Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781607784715
Publisher:
MobileReference
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Mobi Classics
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
564,904
File size:
1 MB

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The Story of Little Black Sambo. ILLUSTRATED 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was a little racy and even offending. Im glad they made a new verdion: the story of little babaji
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Indians from India and Black people purchase books too. I am certain none of these customers have a penchant for sitting up in a tree or for eating water melon. My thought is, a book in which white people love other races would be a better use of time. There are some white people that do and colonial India is long gone. Please think before you suggest a book with its ugly history. Dissertations about its sociological impact would be better reading suggestions. Sorry to go on about this but this is not good at all.