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The Story of the Sea Glass
     

The Story of the Sea Glass

by Anne Dodd, Mary Beth Owens (Photographer)
 

When Nicole finds a beautiful piece of red sea glass on the beach, her grandmother Nana tells her a story from her own childhood of a broken red vase, which may have been the origin of this sea glass. Includes information about sea glass and instructionsfor making a sea glass sun-catcher.

Overview

When Nicole finds a beautiful piece of red sea glass on the beach, her grandmother Nana tells her a story from her own childhood of a broken red vase, which may have been the origin of this sea glass. Includes information about sea glass and instructionsfor making a sea glass sun-catcher.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This somewhat labored story of Nicole and her grandmother is nonetheless chock-full of visual pleasures. Owens's (The Caribou Alphabet) panoramic scenes of Nicole and Nana searching for sea glass will appeal to ocean lovers and may well lure a few newcomers to Maine's breathtaking coast. Unfortunately, the lengthy text is excessively mannered and the plot-within-a-plot needlessly complicated. After a prolonged lead-in filled with Nana's memories, the book's central flashback story is triggered by a piece of smooth red sea glass the woman finds on the beach. She tells Nicole a story about how she accidentally broke an heirloom red glass vase and threw the broken shards into the sea to hide them. Despite an occasional pleasing image, Nana's speeches often overemphasize the book's themes ("This red glass is frosted now, and I can't see through it. It can't give us the rose-colored world I saw through the magical red vase. Yet the sun makes it glow in a wonderful new way"). Owens's watercolors, drenched in summer sunlight, portray the warm relationship between Nicole and her grandmother--and go a long way to ameliorate the strained tone of the text. All ages. (Dec.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Martha Shaw
Nicole and Nana explore the Maine seacoast and find a very special piece of sea glass. It has to be part of the old red vase the child who is now Nana accidentally broke and secretly discarded so long ago. What a clever way to show the ocean's role in producing sea glass, by years of turning and polishing glass. Further explanations in the back delineate the kinds and colors of glass and bottles. Soda bottles (clear), wine bottles (green), and beer bottles (brown) are the most common, and old medicine bottles or cold cream jars (blue) produce the rarest glass. This story about a grandmother and granddaughter's trip to the grandmother's childhood beach home and their discovery of a rare piece of red sea glass prompted me to check my own sea glass, a lavender piece from an old bottle. Readers are offered tips on making a sea glass suncatcher as well. Both residents of Maine, author and illustrator pay loving tribute to the state. Owens' watercolor paintings depict the rocky tree-filled coast beautifully, and capture the light-filled summer days as if one were there.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-This story introduces readers to sea glass and its uses, and to the wild beauty of an island off the coast of Maine. Nana takes her granddaughter Nicole on a summer trip to visit the island where she lived as a child. They explore the beach and find a rare piece of red sea glass. It reminds Nana of a shameful incident in her youth when she accidentally broke her mother's treasured red vase and then tried to hide the evidence by throwing the pieces in the ocean. She wonders whether this piece could be from that vase. Although there is an attempt to make this an intergenerational story, it is Nana's tale that serves as a preliminary to the appended discussion of sea glass and the instructions for making sun-catchers. Nicole has very little to say throughout, except to ask an occasional question or offer a brief comment. It is in the watercolor illustrations that readers see the pair together enjoying their exploration of the rugged, still remote, and beautiful island.-Virginia Golodetz, Children's Literature New England, Burlington, VT Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780892724161
Publisher:
Down East Books
Publication date:
02/28/2006
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.89(w) x 11.38(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
4 - 18 Years

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