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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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"This Master Hyde, if he were studied,' thought he, 'must have secrets of his own; black secrets, by the look of him; secrets compared to which poor Jekyll's worst would be like sunshine.'" —The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

When Edward Hyde traples an innocent girl, two bystanders catch the fellow and force him to pay reparations to the girl's family. A respected lawyer, Utterson, hears this story and begins to unravel the seemingly manic behavior of his best friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and his ...

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Overview

"This Master Hyde, if he were studied,' thought he, 'must have secrets of his own; black secrets, by the look of him; secrets compared to which poor Jekyll's worst would be like sunshine.'" —The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

When Edward Hyde traples an innocent girl, two bystanders catch the fellow and force him to pay reparations to the girl's family. A respected lawyer, Utterson, hears this story and begins to unravel the seemingly manic behavior of his best friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and his connection with Hyde. Utterson probes into both Jekyll and his unlikely protégé, increasingly unnerved at each new revelation. In a forerunner of psychological dramas to come, Robert Louis stevenson uses Hyde to show that we are both repulsed and attracted to the darker side of life, particularly when we can experience it in anonymity.

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A retelling of the tale in which a kind and well-respected doctor is transformed into a murderous madman by taking a secret drug of his own creation. Illustrated notes throughout the text explain the historical background of the story.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Mattotti and his longtime collaborator Kramsky return to the comix world with an interpretation of Robert Louis Stevenson's tale of gothic horror. While the story is set in Victorian England, Mattotti's artwork evokes the masterful expressionism of Berlin of the 1930s and such influences as Max Beckman, George Grosz and Giorgio de Chirico. Dr. Jekyll's obsession with the duality of the human personality-the good and evil that reside within-leads him to concoct the potion that brings out his purely evil side. Depicting this transformation, Mattotti's art becomes even more expressive, reminiscent of the later paintings of Francis Bacon. Jekyll's assertion that with his potion "Life would be relieved of all that is horrible" proves wrong. Indeed, he has distilled life's horrors in the person of the brutal Mr. Hyde, who haunts the nightclubs, parties, darkened streets and brothels of London, a perfect vehicle for Mattotti's masterful command of color, composition and mood. An accomplished colorist, Mattotti saturates the book's pages with a rich palette, and each panel is beautiful and expressive. Kramsky's adept condensation of Stevenson's book appropriates snatches of the original text verbatim, maintaining the power of Stevenson's prose while using a minimum amount of text. This is an impressive and vivid interpretation of Stevenson's timeless tale of the human spirit. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
For more than one hundred years this shocking mystery has enthralled readers. Within six months of publication 40,000 copies had been sold in England. The story propelled Stevenson to national and international fame. Inspired by his dreams or rather nightmares, readers journey through the good and evil sides of one man. The story of Dr. Jekyll and his evil self is enhanced with information about the period and a profusion of illustrations. While some may find it distracting, most will relish the insights into the culture, dress and general lifestyle of the period. It makes many aspects of the story more understandable and may encourage kids to tackle more of Stevenson's books. For older students of literature, this and others in "The Whole Story" series will open the door to further research. 1999, Viking, Ages 9 up, $25.99. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up

This simplified retelling of the classic novella is clearly meant for students. There are quotes from the original throughout, but the majority of the text consists of paraphrased summaries of Stevenson's story. Vocabulary words and potentially confusing plot points are footnoted and explained. Sometimes this addition is well executed, but there are several instances in which words that are fairly self-explanatory are defined anyway, giving the book an overly educational feel. The story itself fills just 33 pages of a 48-page book. The rest of the space is filled with biographical information on Stevenson, a science/medicine/crime time line from 1765 to 1850, and a history of performances based on the novel. Gelev's artwork is skilled and realistic, and he does wonderful things with glowing lights from candles and lanterns. Unfortunately the art does not get a chance to shine because the layout isolates each (too-small) image from the others on the page. The only place where readers can really appreciate Gelev's talents is on the front cover, which shows Jekyll mixing the potion, drinking it, and turning into Hyde. Which, if you think about it, will spoil the biggest surprise in the story for anyone unfamiliar with it. This is a serviceable book for larger collections where classics in graphic novel form are needed.-Andrea Lipinski, New York Public Library

Publishers Weekly
Martin Jarvis delivers a gripping reading of Stevenson's classic. When Gabriel Utteron discovers that the sinister Mr. Hyde has moved into the home of his friend Dr. Jekyll and stands to benefit from his will, he becomes concerned and enlists the help of their mutual friend, Dr. Hastie Lanyon. Things go from bad to worse: Jekyll withdraws further from his social circle; Hyde's criminal sprees culminate in murder; and Utteron and Lanyon fight to save their friend and unravel the mystery of Hyde's origins and disappearance. Jarvis's pacing is excellent, his characterization spot on, and his renditions of Jekyll and Hyde perfect; he creates two distinct characters that illustrate the story's exploration into the duality of human nature. (Feb.)
Midwest Book Review
"Martin Danahay's new edition of the Robert Louis Stevenson horror fantasy classic (first published in 1886) sets this seminal, influential work firmly in the context out of which it emerged. The many appendices include a range of contemporary reactions to the novel; a selection of Victorian views on criminality and degeneracy; descriptions of Soho and London's West End in the 1880s; and a portfolio of newspaper accounts of and reaction to the 'Jack the Ripper' murders. This scholarly edition of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is highly recommended for personal and academic library collections and literary studies reading lists."
Choice
Delightfully detailed explanatory notes...This is a major edition of a major work...Essential.
English Literature in Translation
The Centenary Edition marches majestically and triumphantly on... A Splendid edition.

— Harold Orel

John Kucich University of Michigan
"Martin Danahay's edition of Jekyll and Hyde is a treasure-trove of biographical, cultural, and historical materials. It makes a number of important contexts for interpretation available through its accessible but intriguing assemblage of ancillary documents. It cannot fail to be the inspiration for deeper investigations of a masterpiece that is itself at the crossroads of Victorian anxieties about sex, class, psychology, evolution, and the rise of popular culture."
Ann C. Colley
"The appendices to this edition offer the reader a splendid sense of the book’s cultural background. Especially interesting are the selections from nineteenth-century psychology. The discussions concerning the nature of dreaming and the concept of the 'double-brain' add an intriguing dimension to one’s understanding of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde."
Patrick Brantlinger Indiana University
"Danahay provides an authoritative text, an excellent introductory commentary, an up to date bibliography, and a well-chosen set of contextualizing appendices. For an in-depth understanding of Stevenson's masterpiece of horror this is the text of choice."
Gordon Hirsch University of Minnesota
"Danahay's edition of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde places that text in a variety of important and enriching contexts, using selections from Stevenson's letters and other relevant works, as well as contemporary reviews and responses (including a Punch parody and an early adaptation of Jekyll and Hyde for the stage). The appendices also connect Stevenson's novel with Victorian thought about psychology, criminality, degeneracy, and urban life. Providing a splendid, brief immersion in late Victorian culture, this edition will be a boon to the classroom or to an individual's private enjoyment of this classic tale."
Patricia O'Neill Hamilton College
"Martin Danahay's edition justifies our on-going admiration for this masterpiece of English literature. The appendices offer students and scholars alike interesting and important insights into the cultural context of the novel."
Bloomsbury Review
"This classic tale . . . addresses the duality in man’s nature and is here illustrated with twelve atmospheric woodcuts by Barry Moser that underscore the darkness of Stevenson’s tale and continue Moser’s legacy of bringing new life to the classics."—Bloomsbury Review
New Yorker
"Pull[s] out all the stops."—New Yorker
Booklist
"Moser’s small, stirring wood engravings will help draw horror fans to the classic novel that has popularized the concept of the double. . . . If you haven’t reread it recently, you may be astonished by its suspensefulness and its disquieting power."—Booklist
Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction
"The dozen wood engravings by Moser will knock you out. . . . You must own it!"—Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction
English Literature in Translation - Harold Orel
The Centenary Edition marches majestically and triumphantly on... A Splendid edition.
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up—Each book opens with a few paragraphs about the author and closes with a couple pages of related educational material. Dr. Jekyll has profiles of mad scientists, Gulliver's Travels offers an introduction to "Monsters and Midgets" in folklore, and Swiss Family Robinson includes a discussion of caves and their formation and uses. There is a clearly formulaic approach to the books, but the artwork is solid across the board and the layouts are attractive. Adherence to the original texts varies from title to title. For example, Swiss Family Robinson takes some liberties with dialogue and narration, whereas Gulliver's Travels is almost verbatim in its adaptation, changing only a few 25-cent words to 10-cent words, or similar paraphrasing. The most obvious shortcoming is the use of computer-generated speech bubbles and typed text, which looks really out of place in the middle of the lovely and detailed, hand-drawn illustrations. Overall, the quality of the art and respect for the original works give these adaptations an edge over what schools and libraries normally have to choose from in this category.—Jason M. Poole, Webster Public Library, NY
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780755338856
  • Publisher: Headline Book Publishing, Limited
  • Publication date: 10/1/2007
  • Series: Headline Review Classics Series
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 982,507
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson (13 November 1850 - 3 December 1894) was a Scottish novelist.
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Read an Excerpt

Story of the Door

MR. UTTERSON the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theater, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly: "I let my brother go to the devil in his own way." In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour.

No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted.

It chanced on one of these rambles that their way led them down a by-street in a busy quarter of London. The street was small and what is called quiet, but it drove a thriving trade on the weekdays. The inhabitants were all doing well, it seemed, and all emulously hoping to do better still, and laying out the surplus of their grains in coquetry; so that the shop fronts stood along that thoroughfare with an air of invitation, like rows of smiling saleswomen. Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.

Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east, the line was broken by the entry of a court; and just at that point, a certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street. It was two storeys high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lower storey and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on the upper; and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence. The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was blistered and distained. Tramps slouched into the recess and struck matches on the panels; children kept shop upon the steps; the schoolboy had tried his knife on the mouldings; and for close on a generation, no one had appeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages.

Mr. Enfield and the lawyer were on the other side of the by-street; but when they came abreast of the entry, the former lifted up his cane and pointed.

"Did you ever remark that door?" he asked; and when his companion had replied in the affirmative, "It is connected in my mind," added he, "with a very odd story."

"Indeed?" said Mr. Utterson, with a slight change of voice, "and what was that?"

"Well, it was this way," returned Mr. Enfield: "I was coming home from some place at the end of the world, about three o'clock of a black winter morning, and my way lay through a part of town where there was literally nothing to be seen but lamps. Street after street, and all the folks asleep--street after street, all lighted up as if for a procession and all as empty as a church--till at last I got into that state of mind when a man listens and listens and begins to long for the sight of a policeman. All at once, I saw two figures: one a little man who was stumping along eastward at a good walk, and the other a girl of maybe eight or ten who was running as hard as she was able down a cross street. Well, sir, the two ran into one another naturally enough at the corner; and then came the horrible part of the thing; for the man trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming on the ground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see. It wasn't like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut. I gave a view halloa, took to my heels, collared my gentleman, and brought him back to where there was already quite a group about the screaming child. He was perfectly cool and made no resistance, but gave me one look, so ugly that it brought out the sweat on me like running. The people who had turned out were the girl's own family; and pretty soon, the doctor, for whom she had been sent, put in his appearance. Well, the child was not much the worse, more frightened, according to the Sawbones; and there you might have supposed would be an end to it. But there was one curious circumstance. I had taken a loathing to my gentleman at first sight. So had the child's family, which was only natural. But the doctor's case was what struck me. He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age and colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent, and about as emotional as a bagpipe. Well, sir, he was like the rest of us; every time he looked at my prisoner, I saw that Sawbones turn sick and white with desire to kill him. I knew what was in his mind, just as he knew what was in mine; and killing being out of the question, we did the next best. We told the man we could and would make such a scandal out of this, as should make his name stink from one end of London to the other. If he had any friends or any credit, we undertook that he should lose them. And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot, we were keeping the women off him as best we could, for they were as wild as harpies. I never saw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black, sneering coolness--frightened too, I could see that--but carrying it off, sir, really like Satan. 'If you choose to make capital out of this accident,' said he, 'I am naturally helpless. No gentleman but wishes to avoid a scene,' says he. 'Name your figure.' Well, we screwed him up to a hundred pounds for the child's family; he would have clearly liked to stick out; but there was something about the lot of us that meant mischief, and at last he struck. The next thing was to get the money; and where do you think he carried us but to that place with the door?--whipped out a key, went in, and presently came back with the matter of ten pounds in gold and a cheque for the balance on Coutts's, drawn payable to bearer and signed with a name that I can't mention, though it's one of the points of my story, but it was a name at least very well known and often printed. The figure was stiff; but the signature was good for more than that, if it was only genuine. I took the liberty of pointing out to my gentleman that the whole business looked apocryphal, and that a man does not, in real life, walk into a cellar door at four in the morning and come out with another man's cheque for close upon a hundred pounds. But he was quite easy and sneering. 'Set your mind at rest,' says he, 'I will stay with you till the banks open and cash the cheque myself.' So we all set off, the doctor, and the child's father, and our friend and myself, and passed the rest of the night in my chambers; and next day, when we had breakfasted, went in a body to the bank. I gave in the cheque myself, and said I had every reason to believe it was a forgery. Not a bit of it. The cheque was genuine."

"Tut-tut," said Mr. Utterson.

"I see you feel as I do," said Mr. Enfield. "Yes, it's a bad story. For my man was a fellow that nobody could have to do with, a really damnable man; and the person that drew the cheque is the very pink of the proprieties, celebrated too, and (what makes it worse) one of your fellows who do what they call good. Black mail, I suppose; an honest man paying through the nose for some of the capers of his youth. Black Mail House is what I call the place with the door, in consequence. Though even that, you know, is far from explaining all," he added, and with the words fell into a vein of musing.

From this he was recalled by Mr. Utterson asking rather suddenly: "And you don't know if the drawer of the cheque lives there?"

"A likely place, isn't it?" returned Mr. Enfield. "But I happen to have noticed his address; he lives in some square or other."

"And you never asked about the--place with the door?" said Mr. Utterson.

"No, sir: I had a delicacy," was the reply. "I feel very strongly about putting questions; it partakes too much of the style of the day of judgment. You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask."

"A very good rule, too," said the lawyer.

"But I have studied the place for myself," continued Mr. Enfield. "It seems scarcely a house. There is no other door, and nobody goes in or out of that one but, once in a great while, the gentleman of my adventure. There are three windows looking on the court on the first floor; none below; the windows are always shut but they're clean. And then there is a chimney which is generally smoking; so somebody must live there. And yet it's not so sure; for the buildings are so packed together about the court, that it's hard to say where one ends and another begins."

The pair walked on again for a while in silence; and then "Enfield," said Mr. Utterson, "that's a good rule of yours."

"Yes, I think it is," returned Enfield.

"But for all that," continued the lawyer, "there's one point I want to ask: I want to ask the name of that man who walked over the child."

"Well," said Mr. Enfield, "I can't see what harm it would do. It was a man of the name of Hyde."

"Hm," said Mr. Utterson. "What sort of a man is he to see?"

"He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something downright detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn't specify the point. He's an extraordinary-looking man, and yet I really can name nothing out of the way. No, sir; I can make no hand of it; I can't describe him. And it's not want of memory; for I declare I can see him this moment."

Mr. Utterson again walked some way in silence and obviously under a weight of consideration. "You are sure he used a key?" he inquired at last.

"My dear sir . . ." began Enfield, surprised out of himself.

"Yes, I know," said Utterson; "I know it must seem strange. The fact is, if I do not ask you the name of the other party, it is because I know it already. You see, Richard, your tale has gone home. If you have been inexact in any point, you had better correct it."

"I think you might have warned me," returned the other with a touch of sullenness. "But I have been pedantically exact, as you call it. The fellow had a key; and what's more, he has it still. I saw him use it, not a week ago."

Mr. Utterson sighed deeply but said never a word; and the young man presently resumed. "Here is another lesson to say nothing," said he. "I am ashamed of my long tongue. Let us make a bargain never to refer to this again."

"With all my heart," said the lawyer. "I shake hands on that, Richard."

Searching for Mr.Hyde

THAT EVENING Mr. Utterson came home to his bachelor house in sombre spirits and sat down to dinner without relish. It was his custom of a Sunday, when this meal was over, to sit close by the fire, a volume of some dry divinity on his reading desk, until the clock of the neighbouring church rang out the hour of twelve, when he would go soberly and gratefully to bed. On this night, however, as soon as the cloth was taken away, he took up a candle and went into his business room. There he opened his safe, took from the most private part of it a document endorsed on the envelope as Dr. Jekyll's Will, and sat down with a clouded brow to study its contents. The will was holograph, for Mr. Utterson, though he took charge of it now that it was made, had refused to lend the least assistance in the making of it; it provided not only that, in case of the decease of Henry Jekyll, M.D., D.C.L., L.L.D., F.R.S., etc., all his possessions were to pass into the hands of his "friend and benefactor Edward Hyde," but that in case of Dr. Jekyll's "disappearance or unexplained absence for any period exceeding three calendar months," the said Edward Hyde should step into the said Henry Jekyll's shoes without further delay and free from any burthen or obligation, beyond the payment of a few small sums to the members of the doctor's household. This document had long been the lawyer's eyesore. It offended him both as a lawyer and as a lover of the sane and customary sides of life, to whom the fanciful was the immodest. And hitherto it was his ignorance of Mr. Hyde that had swelled his indignation; now, by a sudden turn, it was his knowledge. It was already bad enough when the name was but a name of which he could learn no more. It was worse when it began to be clothed upon with destestable attributes; and out of the shifting, insubstantial mists that had so long baffled his eye, there leaped up the sudden, definite presentment of a fiend.

From the Paperback edition.

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Table of Contents

Foreword vii
Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 1
Notes 83
Biographical note 85
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First Chapter

STORY OF THE DOOR


MR. UTTERSON the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theater, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly: "I let my brother go to the devil in his own way." In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour.

No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growthof time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted.

It chanced on one of these rambles that their way led them down a by-street in a busy quarter of London. The street was small and what is called quiet, but it drove a thriving trade on the weekdays. The inhabitants were all doing well, it seemed, and all emulously hoping to do better still, and laying out the surplus of their grains in coquetry; so that the shop fronts stood along that thoroughfare with an air of invitation, like rows of smiling saleswomen. Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.

Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east, the line was broken by the entry of a court; and just at that point, a certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street. It was two storeys high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lower storey and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on the upper; and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence. The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was blistered and distained. Tramps slouched into the recess and struck matches on the panels; children kept shop upon the steps; the schoolboy had tried his knife on the mouldings; and for close on a generation, no one had appeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages.

Mr. Enfield and the lawyer were on the other side of the by-street; but when they came abreast of the entry, the former lifted up his cane and pointed.

"Did you ever remark that door?" he asked; and when his companion had replied in the affirmative, "It is connected in my mind," added he, "with a very odd story."

"Indeed?" said Mr. Utterson, with a slight change of voice, "and what was that?"

"Well, it was this way," returned Mr. Enfield: "I was coming home from some place at the end of the world, about three o'clock of a black winter morning, and my way lay through a part of town where there was literally nothing to be seen but lamps. Street after street, and all the folks asleep--street after street, all lighted up as if for a procession and all as empty as a church--till at last I got into that state of mind when a man listens and listens and begins to long for the sight of a policeman. All at once, I saw two figures: one a little man who was stumping along eastward at a good walk, and the other a girl of maybe eight or ten who was running as hard as she was able down a cross street. Well, sir, the two ran into one another naturally enough at the corner; and then came the horrible part of the thing; for the man trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming on the ground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see. It wasn't like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut. I gave a view halloa, took to my heels, collared my gentleman, and brought him back to where there was already quite a group about the screaming child. He was perfectly cool and made no resistance, but gave me one look, so ugly that it brought out the sweat on me like running. The people who had turned out were the girl's own family; and pretty soon, the doctor, for whom she had been sent, put in his appearance. Well, the child was not much the worse, more frightened, according to the Sawbones; and there you might have supposed would be an end to it. But there was one curious circumstance. I had taken a loathing to my gentleman at first sight. So had the child's family, which was only natural. But the doctor's case was what struck me. He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age and colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent, and about as emotional as a bagpipe. Well, sir, he was like the rest of us; every time he looked at my prisoner, I saw that Sawbones turn sick and white with desire to kill him. I knew what was in his mind, just as he knew what was in mine; and killing being out of the question, we did the next best. We told the man we could and would make such a scandal out of this, as should make his name stink from one end of London to the other. If he had any friends or any credit, we undertook that he should lose them. And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot, we were keeping the women off him as best we could, for they were as wild as harpies. I never saw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black, sneering coolness--frightened too, I could see that--but carrying it off, sir, really like Satan. 'If you choose to make capital out of this accident,' said he, 'I am naturally helpless. No gentleman but wishes to avoid a scene,' says he. 'Name your figure.' Well, we screwed him up to a hundred pounds for the child's family; he would have clearly liked to stick out; but there was something about the lot of us that meant mischief, and at last he struck. The next thing was to get the money; and where do you think he carried us but to that place with the door?--whipped out a key, went in, and presently came back with the matter of ten pounds in gold and a cheque for the balance on Coutts's, drawn payable to bearer and signed with a name that I can't mention, though it's one of the points of my story, but it was a name at least very well known and often printed. The figure was stiff; but the signature was good for more than that, if it was only genuine. I took the liberty of pointing out to my gentleman that the whole business looked apocryphal, and that a man does not, in real life, walk into a cellar door at four in the morning and come out with another man's cheque for close upon a hundred pounds. But he was quite easy and sneering. 'Set your mind at rest,' says he, 'I will stay with you till the banks open and cash the cheque myself.' So we all set off, the doctor, and the child's father, and our friend and myself, and passed the rest of the night in my chambers; and next day, when we had breakfasted, went in a body to the bank. I gave in the cheque myself, and said I had every reason to believe it was a forgery. Not a bit of it. The cheque was genuine."

"Tut-tut," said Mr. Utterson.

"I see you feel as I do," said Mr. Enfield. "Yes, it's a bad story. For my man was a fellow that nobody could have to do with, a really damnable man; and the person that drew the cheque is the very pink of the proprieties, celebrated too, and (what makes it worse) one of your fellows who do what they call good. Black mail, I suppose; an honest man paying through the nose for some of the capers of his youth. Black Mail House is what I call the place with the door, in consequence. Though even that, you know, is far from explaining all," he added, and with the words fell into a vein of musing.

From this he was recalled by Mr. Utterson asking rather suddenly: "And you don't know if the drawer of the cheque lives there?"

"A likely place, isn't it?" returned Mr. Enfield. "But I happen to have noticed his address; he lives in some square or other."

"And you never asked about the--place with the door?" said Mr. Utterson.

"No, sir: I had a delicacy," was the reply. "I feel very strongly about putting questions; it partakes too much of the style of the day of judgment. You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask."

"A very good rule, too," said the lawyer.

"But I have studied the place for myself," continued Mr. Enfield. "It seems scarcely a house. There is no other door, and nobody goes in or out of that one but, once in a great while, the gentleman of my adventure. There are three windows looking on the court on the first floor; none below; the windows are always shut but they're clean. And then there is a chimney which is generally smoking; so somebody must live there. And yet it's not so sure; for the buildings are so packed together about the court, that it's hard to say where one ends and another begins."

The pair walked on again for a while in silence; and then "Enfield," said Mr. Utterson, "that's a good rule of yours."

"Yes, I think it is," returned Enfield.

"But for all that," continued the lawyer, "there's one point I want to ask: I want to ask the name of that man who walked over the child."

"Well," said Mr. Enfield, "I can't see what harm it would do. It was a man of the name of Hyde."

"Hm," said Mr. Utterson. "What sort of a man is he to see?"

"He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something downright detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn't specify the point. He's an extraordinary-looking man, and yet I really can name nothing out of the way. No, sir; I can make no hand of it; I can't describe him. And it's not want of memory; for I declare I can see him this moment."

Mr. Utterson again walked some way in silence and obviously under a weight of consideration. "You are sure he used a key?" he inquired at last.

"My dear sir . . ." began Enfield, surprised out of himself.

"Yes, I know," said Utterson; "I know it must seem strange. The fact is, if I do not ask you the name of the other party, it is because I know it already. You see, Richard, your tale has gone home. If you have been inexact in any point, you had better correct it."

"I think you might have warned me," returned the other with a touch of sullenness. "But I have been pedantically exact, as you call it. The fellow had a key; and what's more, he has it still. I saw him use it, not a week ago."

Mr. Utterson sighed deeply but said never a word; and the young man presently resumed. "Here is another lesson to say nothing," said he. "I am ashamed of my long tongue. Let us make a bargain never to refer to this again."

"With all my heart," said the lawyer. "I shake hands on that, Richard."



SEARCH FOR MR. HYDE



THAT EVENING Mr. Utterson came home to his bachelor house in sombre spirits and sat down to dinner without relish. It was his custom of a Sunday, when this meal was over, to sit close by the fire, a volume of some dry divinity on his reading desk, until the clock of the neighbouring church rang out the hour of twelve, when he would go soberly and gratefully to bed. On this night, however, as soon as the cloth was taken away, he took up a candle and went into his business room. There he opened his safe, took from the most private part of it a document endorsed on the envelope as Dr. Jekyll's Will, and sat down with a clouded brow to study its contents. The will was holograph, for Mr. Utterson, though he took charge of it now that it was made, had refused to lend the least assistance in the making of it; it provided not only that, in case of the decease of Henry Jekyll, M.D., D.C.L., L.L.D., F.R.S., etc., all his possessions were to pass into the hands of his "friend and benefactor Edward Hyde," but that in case of Dr. Jekyll's "disappearance or unexplained absence for any period exceeding three calendar months," the said Edward Hyde should step into the said Henry Jekyll's shoes without further delay and free from any burthen or obligation, beyond the payment of a few small sums to the members of the doctor's household. This document had long been the lawyer's eyesore. It offended him both as a lawyer and as a lover of the sane and customary sides of life, to whom the fanciful was the immodest. And hitherto it was his ignorance of Mr. Hyde that had swelled his indignation; now, by a sudden turn, it was his knowledge. It was already bad enough when the name was but a name of which he could learn no more. It was worse when it began to be clothed upon with destestable attributes; and out of the shifting, insubstantial mists that had so long baffled his eye, there leaped up the sudden, definite presentment of a fiend.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 65 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 65 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    An intriguing tale on the duality of man

    Like Frankenstein, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a tale of a good man who lets his ambitions lead him astray. But unlike Frankenstein, where one should not judge by looks alone, Mr. Hyde is exactly as he appears. To borrow a cliche, evil incarnate.

    While most of Frankenstein is told from a first-person's perspective, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is narrated by several people who have either met Hyde or knows Jekyll. If I wasn't already aware of how the story played out, I imagine this would have been a great setup for the dramatic revelation at the end. As it is, there are times when I couldn't help but forget about the ending in my search for any tell-tale hints early on to clue in the reader. There are a few but I'm not sure I could have made the correct deduction on my own.

    The battle between the personalities of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is supposed to reflect the duality of man, a battle of good versus evil. If so, the ending is a rather pessimistic outlook isn't it ? Mr. Hyde as the personification of evil may not have escaped just punishment but at least in his struggles with Dr. Jekyll, he gained the upper hand. However if the winner of their battle was Dr. Jekyll, the tale might not have been as memorable. That is my take at least.

    An enjoyable read. Definitely should be read at least once.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2012

    Poor quality OCR scan

    The letters are quite confused, making this impractical to read. Try the Gutenberg edition instead.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2012

    Crazy

    Rather have the monry one than this. Doesnt even have story related words.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2009

    Not a great book.

    The Strange Case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde, is very unorignal. While reading, you will find yourself thinking about the point of the story. Well, there is no meaning behind this book. It's hard to enjoy, and you will get nothing out of it. You will not like it, even if you are reading for "fun" DONT WASTE YOUR MONEY!

    1 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2002

    BEST BOOK EVER !!!!!!!!!!! Highly recommended.

    This book is one of the best books ever written by Robertson. It is about a doctor named Dr. Henry Jekyll. He discovers a potion that can divide his good and evil side. It is narrated by Mr. Utterson. It is set in London, England in the late 1800s or 19th century. The setting is by the mention of wine all through out the book. The author creates suspension by shifting point-of-views. The main theme is dual nature. Man is not good and evil, but a combination of both. The symbolism is great. The book has lots of hidden meanings and can go one way or another. The book is not really believable, but you might believe it depending on who you are. I loved the theme of the book. I also loved how pithy it was. Eventhough the book says that Mr. Hyde is pure evil, there is actually no proof in the novel that makes him worse than your average murderer. Books like Dracula are long and have no excitement, but Robertson uses suspense and makes it exciting. I especially loved the contradiction between good and evil. The book was very close to being realistic. The author used a lot of vocabulary from the 19th century and a wide variety. I had to read this book for my Outside Reading Project and it was very good. Trust me you will love it. Don't use cliff notes, you miss the meaning and ecitement of the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2000

    A timeless mystery.

    ¿Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde¿ is a very quick, but interesting read. The genre is a mix between a mystery and a horror. The book, over all, has a dark feel to it, which adds a hint of gloominess. <p> Robert Louis Stevenson delivers the content of this book very well. Throughout the novel, there is an uncomfortable feeling that dwells in the reader¿s mind. The only thing that isn¿t done well is that the outcome of the story was fairly obvious. A factor that might contribute to this is that the tale is very well known in our society. It is still a great read for those who know the story and for those who don¿t.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2000

    great book for a classic

    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was a really good book. It caught your attention from the beginning of the story.The only thing about the book I didn't like was that it was kind of hard to keep up with. But it had a terrifc suprise ending.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2000

    Very Good Book

    This is probably the best book I've ever read. Me being just 14 you may say, ' Oh what does this kid know?' Well I've read enough books to know that this is indeed a great book. The book has just one plot but, tops everything off with an ironic and twisted ending. You probably have allready asummed the ending, but if you had no idea of what this book was about you would be in complete ahhhhhhh over it. Very exciting. Set down on a Monday to begin reading it and finished the following night. It's considered a 'Can't put downer'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 1999

    Strange Case

    What I think of this book is pretty cool but strange. When first I start to read this book everyhting was weird even the characterization. Then I get used to it and it gets more intersting.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 1999

    One of Best Books

    This book is one of the three best horror books ever made along with Mary Shelly's 'Frankenstein' and Bram Stoker's 'Dracula.' I think everyone should read it to see if they like it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2014

    Hydra

    Walks in.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2014

    Continue please

    So horneh

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2014

    CONTINUE!!!!!

    PLEASE CONTINUE!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2014

    The Life of Hyde

    *Riley slowly licked Morgan's c<_>lit, making Morgan shudder. Riley deepened her licks and pulled down Morgan's shorts. Riley lifted Morgan's right leg onto a nearby box, spreading her legs to get a good position. Riley opened up Morgan's p<_<ussy and sucked on its insides. Morgan gasped and moaned.* <br> "ooo! Yea...that feels good..." moaned Morgan. <br> *Riley widened Morgan's legs and slipped a finger inside her, moving in and out. Riley added a second finger and licked up any juices that came out of Morgan. Morgan began to squeeze her n<_>ipples, hard under her touch. Riley moved in and out faster and faster making Morgan twitch with delight. Morgan came all over Riley's fingers and Riley licked them up. <p> Sorry guys but I have to end the chapter here. I'm really busy at the moment and will right either a beyter chapter or the secobd part of this chapter. You'll see. Bye now!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2014

    I lurve it!

    Please read the cl<_>op l whipped up at 'cuni'. &jearts

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    A. Lost

    Really Platinum? I could've just stayed at the Revo to find here, if you know the shortcuts. -_- well off to finish one part of my challenge...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Extus sapphire

    Okay

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2014

    By cd

    I really like this book. It is scary in some parts but is great over all. Anyone under the age of 10 shouldn't read this book. But besides that it is pretty good book about a man finds a wy to split the good and evil in him to to diffrent beings while still being one. Hard to describe but after you read it you will get what I am saying. You should read this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2013

    Ytjgnhmfcfbhkhgsghjk

    Vfhhkfdbhjdffjhdffjzgkjgddjgsfgjsggfvfvvfbfbfgffvfcbvvcbffvfhfhfhfhfhhfhfhffhgggggggggggggggggggggngghgggggggggggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh bbbbghjcngnnvcggghhjhhhhhhjjyyuuuyyyyyyytyyyyhhyyyyyyhyyyhhhhhhhhhhhhhghghhhhghgggggggghhgghggggggggggggggggfvvnvnvnvvnvnvnvnvnnvnvbnvbnvnnvnvjnvjjvvjvjjcjhbvbcbjcjcbcjcjcccccjcjchchbbvbchvjcjhcjjvcjvjcjjcfstdyfyfyhcccbcbcbcbccccbvbbvvnvnvnvnbvnvvbchbchchchchghhhfhchvhchvbvhvhcvhvjvvjvjcjgjgggjggvjgjggjgjgjgjjgggjggggjfhfhfhfgfjgjgjgjghfpgogovogogigogofigigochvnvbcnvnvnvnvnnnvvvjjjjhkhjgkjgjjjggggggkggggjnnnjkkkkvjnvnvnvvvvnvnjvnvnvnvnvnnvnvnvjbnbnvnvnnvvnvnvnvnbnvnvvvnnnnvjvjtsdgdhggdggdhdtdttffyghgjguggjgjgjjvjgjgjhjggjjvjgjgjgjgjgu g gfffffffgggggggggggggggggggggghghhhhhhhhhhhigjgnvnnvmvbvmvxbxnjchcvvvggfffffffgghhghhhggghhghghgggggggggggggggggggggggghhhhgkggkkkhbhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhgggggggggggggggggggggggggggggvgggvvvggvgggggggggggg hhhffffhfhhgfgfgfgdgdgdjfgdgdfgddggd

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    '

    '

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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