The Student Aid Game: Meeting Need and Rewarding Talent in American Higher Education

Overview

"This is a wonderful book. The authors' many years of thinking about admissions and financial aid policies and their econometric research on the topic provide the foundations for a nontechnical book that addresses many of the fundamental issues facing society, federal and state government, individual institutions, and students and their families."—Ronald Ehrenberg, Cornell University

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $19.92   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

"This is a wonderful book. The authors' many years of thinking about admissions and financial aid policies and their econometric research on the topic provide the foundations for a nontechnical book that addresses many of the fundamental issues facing society, federal and state government, individual institutions, and students and their families."—Ronald Ehrenberg, Cornell University

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Atlantic Monthly - Donald Kennedy
Confusion and apprehension often drive families into the arms of private counselors, who offer, for a price, to help them master the [student aid] system. They would be well advised to save their money and consult McPherson and Schapiro instead.
From the Publisher
"Confusion and apprehension often drive families into the arms of private counselors, who offer, for a price, to help them master the [student aid] system. They would be well advised to save their money and consult McPherson and Schapiro instead."—Donald Kennedy, Atlantic Monthly

"Because they are primarily interested in how federal policy might more effectively open the doors to college for low-income youth, McPherson and Schapiro, like good economists, analyze the effects of financial-aid programs on the incentives of colleges and parents, and anticipate the impact of recent changes in the tax code on colleges' tuition and aid policies."—
Harvard Magazine

Atlantic Monthly
Confusion and apprehension often drive families into the arms of private counselors, who offer, for a price, to help them master the [student aid] system. They would be well advised to save their money and consult McPherson and Schapiro instead.
— Donald Kennedy
Harvard Magazine
Because they are primarily interested in how federal policy might more effectively open the doors to college for low-income youth, McPherson and Schapiro, like good economists, analyze the effects of financial-aid programs on the incentives of colleges and parents, and anticipate the impact of recent changes in the tax code on colleges' tuition and aid policies.
New Orleans Times-Picayune
If you really want to understand how undergraduate education in this country is financed get The Student Aid Game, by Michael S. McPherson, president of Macalester College, and Morton Owen Schapiro, dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at the University of Southern California. These two scholars have written the definitive guide to this complex and emotional subject. It's a must-read for anyone who is concerned about higher education and its financial availability to low- and middle-income students.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691005362
  • Publisher: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
  • Publication date: 12/14/1998
  • Pages: 176
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Figures and Tables
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Pt. 1 Introduction 1
1 Meeting Need and Rewarding Talent: Student Aid in the U.S. System of Higher Education Finance 5
2 Changing the Rules: The New Strategic Role of Student Aid 15
Pt. 2 Student Aid and Educational Opportunity: Are We Keeping College Affordable? 23
3 Prices and Aid: The Growing Burden on Families 25
4 Access: Student Response to Higher Prices - and Higher Returns 37
5 Choice: How Ability to Pay Affects College Options 42
6 The Future of College Affordability 49
Pt. 3 Student Aid and Institutional Strategy 53
7 Student Aid in Institutional Finance 55
8 How Government Aid Shapes Colleges' Behavior 81
9 Student Aid as a Competitive Weapon 91
Pt. 4 The Special Case of Merit Aid 105
10 Merit Aid: Its Place in History and Its Role in Society 107
11 The Institutional Perspective 116
12 The Student Perspective 122
13 Conclusion: Merit Aid - Good or Bad? 130
Pt. V The Future of Student Aid 133
14 Where Do We Go from Here? 135
Notes 145
Bibliography 153
Index 157
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)