The Student's Companion to Social Policy / Edition 2

The Student's Companion to Social Policy / Edition 2

by Pete Alcock
     
 

ISBN-10: 1405102918

ISBN-13: 9781405102919

Pub. Date: 04/15/2003

Publisher: Wiley

This popular student guide to social policy has now been updated to take account of recent developments in the field.

A website is now available to complement this text at www.blackwellpublishing.com/socialpolicy

  • Provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of social policy.
  • Designed to support students of social policy throughout their studies.

Overview

This popular student guide to social policy has now been updated to take account of recent developments in the field.

A website is now available to complement this text at www.blackwellpublishing.com/socialpolicy

  • Provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of social policy.
  • Designed to support students of social policy throughout their studies.
  • Written by a distinguished team of contributors.
  • Now updated to take account of recent developments in the field.
  • Expanded to cover additional topics.
  • Can be used alongside 'The Blackwell Dictionary of Social Policy' by the same editors.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405102919
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/15/2003
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.52(d)

Table of Contents

Contributors.

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

Introduction.

Part I: What Is Social Policy?.

The Subject of Social Policy: Pete Alcock (University of Birmingham).

The Approaches and Methods of Social Policy: Angus Erskine (University of Stirling).

The Role of Comparative Study: Margaret May (London Metropolitan University).

History and Social Policy: David Gladstone (University of Bristol).

Part II: Values and Perspectives:.

1. Key Concepts:.

Social Needs, Social Problems and Social Welfare : Nick Manning (University of Nottingham).

Equality, Rights and Social Justice : Peter Taylor-Gooby (University of Kent).

Efficiency, Equity and Choice: Carol Propper (University of Bristol).

Altruism, Reciprocity and Obligation: Hilary Land (University of Bristol).

Divisions, Difference and Exclusion: Pete Alcock and Angus Erskine (University of Birmingham; University of Stirling).

2. Key Perspectives:.

The Neo-liberal Perspective: David G. Green (The Institute for the Study of Civil Society).

The Conservative Tradition of Social Welfare: Robert Pinker (London School of Economics).

The Social Democratic Perspective: Michael Sullivan (University of South Wales, Swansea).

The Socialist Perspective: Norman Ginsburg (London Metropolitan University).

The Third Way: Martin Powell (University of Bath).

Feminist Perspectives: Jane Lewis (University of Oxford).

‘Race’ and Social Welfare: Waqar Ahmad and Gary Craig (University of Leeds; University of Hull).

The Green Perspective: Michael Cahill (University of Brighton).

Postmodernism and New Directions: Tony Fitzpatrick (University of Nottingham).

3. The Social Policy Context:.

Social Policy and Economic Policy: Ian Gough (University of Bath).

Social Policy: Culture and Nationhood: Fiona Williams (University of Leeds).

Social Policy and Family Policy: Jane Millar (University of Bath).

Social Policy and Globalization: Rob Sykes (Sheffield Hallam University).

Social Policy and the Political Process: Michael Hill (University of Newcastle).

Part III: The Production, Organization and Consumption of Welfare:.

4. The Production of Welfare:.

State Welfare: Norman Johnson (University of Portsmouth).

Private Welfare: Edward Brunsdon (London Metropolitan University).

The Voluntary Sector: Nicholas Deakin (London School of Economics).

Informal Welfare: Clare Ungerson (University of Southampton).

5. The Organization of Welfare:.

Managing and Delivering Welfare: John Clarke (Open University).

The Governance of Local Welfare: Allan Cochrane (Open University).

Social Policy within the United Kingdom: Richard Parry (University of Edinburgh).

Social Policy and the European Union: Linda Hantrais (Loughborough University).

Supranational Agencies and Social Policy: Bob Deacon (University of Sheffield).

6. The Consumption of Welfare:.

Paying for Welfare: Howard Glennerster (London School of Economics).

Principles of Welfare: Ruth Lister (Loughborough University).

The Distribution of Welfare: John Hills (London School of Economics).

Accountability for Welfare: Janet Newman (Open University).

Part IV: Issues in Social Policy:.

7. Social Policy and Particular Groups:.

Children: Malcolm Hill (University of Glasgow).

Young People: Bob Coles (University of York).

Older People: Alan Walker and Tony Maltby ((University of Birmingham; University of Sheffield).

Disabled People: Mike Oliver (University of Greenwich).

Lone Parents: Jonathan Bradshaw (University of York).

Migrants: Gail Lewis (Open University).

8. Service-based Issues:.

Income Protection and Social Security: Stephen McKay and Karen Rowlingson (University of Bristol; University of Bath).

Employment: Alan Deacon (University of Leeds).

Health Care: Judith Allsop (De Monfort University).

Education: Miriam David (Keele University).

Housing: Alan Murie ((University of Birmingham).

Personal Social Services and Community Care: John Baldock (University of Kent at Canterbury).

Criminal Justice: Dee Cook (University of Wolverhampton).

Part V: Resources:.

9. Studying Social Policy:.

Doing Projects in Social Policy: Hartley Dean (University of Nottingham).

Fieldwork Placements and the Social Policy Curriculum: Duncan Scott (University of Manchester).

10. Learning Resources:.

A Guide to the Literature: Robert M. Page (University of Birmingham).

Data Sources in the UK: National, Central and Local Government: Fran Wasoff.

Other Sources of UK Data: Fran Bennett (University of Oxford).

European and International Data Sources: Deborah Mabbett (Brunel University).

The Internet and Web-based Sources: Melanie Ashford and Pat Young (Learning and Teaching Support Network; University of the West of England).

Part VI: Careers in Social Policy:.

Careers and Postgraduate Study in Social Policy: Margaret May and Catherine Bochel (London Metropolitan University; University of Lincoln).

Appendix: the Social Policy Association (SPA).

Name Index.

Subject Index.

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