The Student's Companion to Social Policy / Edition 2

The Student's Companion to Social Policy / Edition 2

by Pete Alcock
     
 

ISBN-10: 1405102918

ISBN-13: 9781405102919

Pub. Date: 04/15/2003

Publisher: Wiley

This popular student guide to social policy has now been updated to take account of recent developments in the field.

A website is now available to complement this text at www.blackwellpublishing.com/socialpolicy

  • Provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of social policy.
  • Designed to support students of social policy throughout their studies.

…  See more details below

Overview

This popular student guide to social policy has now been updated to take account of recent developments in the field.

A website is now available to complement this text at www.blackwellpublishing.com/socialpolicy

  • Provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of social policy.
  • Designed to support students of social policy throughout their studies.
  • Written by a distinguished team of contributors.
  • Now updated to take account of recent developments in the field.
  • Expanded to cover additional topics.
  • Can be used alongside 'The Blackwell Dictionary of Social Policy' by the same editors.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405102919
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/15/2003
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.52(d)

Table of Contents

Contributors.

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

Introduction.

Part I: What Is Social Policy?.

The Subject of Social Policy: Pete Alcock (University of Birmingham).

The Approaches and Methods of Social Policy: Angus Erskine (University of Stirling).

The Role of Comparative Study: Margaret May (London Metropolitan University).

History and Social Policy: David Gladstone (University of Bristol).

Part II: Values and Perspectives:.

1. Key Concepts:.

Social Needs, Social Problems and Social Welfare : Nick Manning (University of Nottingham).

Equality, Rights and Social Justice : Peter Taylor-Gooby (University of Kent).

Efficiency, Equity and Choice: Carol Propper (University of Bristol).

Altruism, Reciprocity and Obligation: Hilary Land (University of Bristol).

Divisions, Difference and Exclusion: Pete Alcock and Angus Erskine (University of Birmingham; University of Stirling).

2. Key Perspectives:.

The Neo-liberal Perspective: David G. Green (The Institute for the Study of Civil Society).

The Conservative Tradition of Social Welfare: Robert Pinker (London School of Economics).

The Social Democratic Perspective: Michael Sullivan (University of South Wales, Swansea).

The Socialist Perspective: Norman Ginsburg (London Metropolitan University).

The Third Way: Martin Powell (University of Bath).

Feminist Perspectives: Jane Lewis (University of Oxford).

‘Race’ and Social Welfare: Waqar Ahmad and Gary Craig (University of Leeds; University of Hull).

The Green Perspective: Michael Cahill (University of Brighton).

Postmodernism and New Directions: Tony Fitzpatrick (University of Nottingham).

3. The Social Policy Context:.

Social Policy and Economic Policy: Ian Gough (University of Bath).

Social Policy: Culture and Nationhood: Fiona Williams (University of Leeds).

Social Policy and Family Policy: Jane Millar (University of Bath).

Social Policy and Globalization: Rob Sykes (Sheffield Hallam University).

Social Policy and the Political Process: Michael Hill (University of Newcastle).

Part III: The Production, Organization and Consumption of Welfare:.

4. The Production of Welfare:.

State Welfare: Norman Johnson (University of Portsmouth).

Private Welfare: Edward Brunsdon (London Metropolitan University).

The Voluntary Sector: Nicholas Deakin (London School of Economics).

Informal Welfare: Clare Ungerson (University of Southampton).

5. The Organization of Welfare:.

Managing and Delivering Welfare: John Clarke (Open University).

The Governance of Local Welfare: Allan Cochrane (Open University).

Social Policy within the United Kingdom: Richard Parry (University of Edinburgh).

Social Policy and the European Union: Linda Hantrais (Loughborough University).

Supranational Agencies and Social Policy: Bob Deacon (University of Sheffield).

6. The Consumption of Welfare:.

Paying for Welfare: Howard Glennerster (London School of Economics).

Principles of Welfare: Ruth Lister (Loughborough University).

The Distribution of Welfare: John Hills (London School of Economics).

Accountability for Welfare: Janet Newman (Open University).

Part IV: Issues in Social Policy:.

7. Social Policy and Particular Groups:.

Children: Malcolm Hill (University of Glasgow).

Young People: Bob Coles (University of York).

Older People: Alan Walker and Tony Maltby ((University of Birmingham; University of Sheffield).

Disabled People: Mike Oliver (University of Greenwich).

Lone Parents: Jonathan Bradshaw (University of York).

Migrants: Gail Lewis (Open University).

8. Service-based Issues:.

Income Protection and Social Security: Stephen McKay and Karen Rowlingson (University of Bristol; University of Bath).

Employment: Alan Deacon (University of Leeds).

Health Care: Judith Allsop (De Monfort University).

Education: Miriam David (Keele University).

Housing: Alan Murie ((University of Birmingham).

Personal Social Services and Community Care: John Baldock (University of Kent at Canterbury).

Criminal Justice: Dee Cook (University of Wolverhampton).

Part V: Resources:.

9. Studying Social Policy:.

Doing Projects in Social Policy: Hartley Dean (University of Nottingham).

Fieldwork Placements and the Social Policy Curriculum: Duncan Scott (University of Manchester).

10. Learning Resources:.

A Guide to the Literature: Robert M. Page (University of Birmingham).

Data Sources in the UK: National, Central and Local Government: Fran Wasoff.

Other Sources of UK Data: Fran Bennett (University of Oxford).

European and International Data Sources: Deborah Mabbett (Brunel University).

The Internet and Web-based Sources: Melanie Ashford and Pat Young (Learning and Teaching Support Network; University of the West of England).

Part VI: Careers in Social Policy:.

Careers and Postgraduate Study in Social Policy: Margaret May and Catherine Bochel (London Metropolitan University; University of Lincoln).

Appendix: the Social Policy Association (SPA).

Name Index.

Subject Index.

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