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The Stunning Science of Everything
     

The Stunning Science of Everything

by Nick Arnold, Tony De Saulles (Illustrator)
 

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The Stunning Science of Everything is a gruesome guided tour of the world of science, from the tiniest atom to the far-reaching corners of the universe.

The Stunning Science of Everything is just what it says--a stunning gruesome guide to everything! Get set for a whirlwind tour of science.

Want to know...
--What the Assassin Bug's best disguise looks like?

Overview

The Stunning Science of Everything is a gruesome guided tour of the world of science, from the tiniest atom to the far-reaching corners of the universe.

The Stunning Science of Everything is just what it says--a stunning gruesome guide to everything! Get set for a whirlwind tour of science.

Want to know...
--What the Assassin Bug's best disguise looks like?
--If meteors in space can smell bad?
--What poos in your bed 20 times a day?
--If we're actually breathing dinosaur burps?
...then open The Stunning Science of Everything to learn all the gory details.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Angie Hammond
Combining what might be boring scientific fact with busy colorful graphics appears at first glance to be a match made in heaven. Arnold enlists the aid of a crazy cast of characters to tackle the wonders of the universe and-almost-everything in it, starting with the big bang and running through the projected end of the solar system. Breaking up the study of life into small parts (atoms) and large parts (the explosive earth), text is interspersed with comic book-style graphics, jokes, recipes, and general silliness to lead the reader through the world of science. Although the idea for a graphic science book is sound, this one combines facts, information, and text at a much more advanced level than the childlike pictures and captions would lead the reader to expect. Youth enticed by the pictures will likely be put off by the depth of information and language usage, while readers looking for a good sound read through a science text might feel demeaned by the cartoonish graphics and silly attempts to entertain. The lack of index will make it difficult for students trying to put together a school report. Purchase as an extra title for an already strong science collection.
Children's Literature - Michael Chabin
If the average adult understood the science in this book, the country would be vastly better off. It is a funny, frenetic, and engaging tour of the Big Bang theory, atoms, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. It has the broad sweep of a good middle school curriculum, and the prose is witty enough and illustrations funny enough to make the material memorable. There is, for example, a two-page history of how the size and mass of the Earth were determined that highlights both the techniques involved and the peculiarities of the scientists who made the discoveries. One caution though: the book reflects the current fashion for bathroom humor seen elsewhere in books from Captain Underpants and The Magic School Bus. If the fascination with human waste and other ickyness makes science more palatable to kids, then it may be worth putting up with. One would not think it necessary with material as fascinating as this. In this case the jokes are easier on American adults because they have been left in the British vernacular—the word "sick" is used for "vomit" and so on. We all know what the words mean, but somehow they do not seem as crude when spoken with a British accent.
School Library Journal
Gr 4–8
This humorous look at science combines colorful cartoons and writing that ranges from lighthearted to silly and conveys a lot of interesting information. Starting with the Big Bang, the book moves quickly from small (atoms, microbes, and bugs) to big (humans, dinosaurs, and the universe). Each page is filled with cartoon drawings in a variety of visual presentations. A wanted poster introduces a deadly bacterium; film panels describe possible Earth-destroying disasters; and "awful animals" are presented through "secret diary" entries (in which a naked mole rat complains about having to "feed my baby brothers and sisters with my own poo"). Several humorous, but also informational, features recur throughout the book: "Brainy Boffins" are mini-profiles of famous scientists; "stunning science fact files" and "Bet you never knew!" boxes offer impressive tidbits of information; and the "shrinking scientists" are three cartoon characters who investigate DNA molecules, toilet water, and other interesting phenomena. Some readers may find it hard to extract useful knowledge from the barrage of humor, but for others the presentation might be just right. Reinforcing the concept of the electromagnetic force with the fact that "your bum is floating" above your chair, for instance, may be an unconventional approach, but it's also attention-getting, memorable, and accurate. The heavy doses of visual and verbal comedy are built around basic science and a plentiful array of fascinating facts, making this a strong choice for booktalkers and reluctant readers.
—Steven EngelfriedCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439877770
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2006
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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