The Subjection of Women

The Subjection of Women

by John Stuart Mill
     
 

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John Stuart Mill's The Subjection of Women, co-written with his wife (Harriet Taylor Mill) and published in 1869, affronted the religious sensibilities and accepted norms of European society of his day, earning him widespread approbation. The book inspired the early suffragettes and women's rights campaigners, and is considered today a classic of philosophy.

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Overview

John Stuart Mill's The Subjection of Women, co-written with his wife (Harriet Taylor Mill) and published in 1869, affronted the religious sensibilities and accepted norms of European society of his day, earning him widespread approbation. The book inspired the early suffragettes and women's rights campaigners, and is considered today a classic of philosophy.

This edition includes the complete text of the book and the author's footnotes, with easy forward and backward navigation.

Mobile Lyceum: An affordable and portable philosophy library for everyone.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012150332
Publisher:
Mobile Lyceum
Publication date:
01/27/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
157 KB

Meet the Author

John Stuart Mill is considered one of the greatest of 19th-century philosophers; certainly he is amongst the most durable and influential. Utilitarianism, On Liberty, and The Subjection Of Women are all considered classics and remain widely read.

"In Mill's time a woman was generally subject to the whims of her husband and/or father due to social norms which said women were both physically and mentally less able than men, and therefore needed to be 'taken care of.' Contributing to this view were social theories, i.e. survival of the fittest and biological determinism, based on a now considered incorrect understanding of the biological theory of evolution and also religious views supporting a hierarchical view of men and women within the family. The archetype of the ideal woman as mother, wife and homemaker was a powerful idea in 19th century society.

At the time of writing, Mill recognized that he was going against the common views of society and was aware that he would be forced to back up his claims persistently. Mill argued that inequality of women was a relic from the past, when might was right; but it had no place in the modern world. Mill saw this as a hindrance to human development, since effectively half the human race were unable to contribute to society outside of the home." [excerpted from Wikipedia]

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